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Diabetes Watch Blog: From Medicineworld.org

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Do You Read All Of Our Cancer Blogs?

Do You Read All Of Blogs?
This page you have reached is an archive page of diabetes watch blog. If you wish to read current posting of this blog, please go to diabetes watch blog main page. If you wish to read the archived blog postings, simply scroll down to the lower part of the page.

Do you read all of the blogs published by medicineworld.org? Many of our bloggers are busy keeping you updated on the various health related topics. We publish the following blogs at this time.

Cancer blog: I manage the cancer blog with lots of help and support form other bloggers. Through this cancer blog my friends and I try to bring stories of hope for patients with cancer. The cancer blog often republishes important blog posts from other cancer related blogs at Medicineworld.org. If you are searching for a blog that covers wide variety of cancer topics, this may be the one for you.

Breast cancer blog: Breast cancer blog is run by Emily and other bloggers and they bring you the latest stories, news and events that are related to breast cancer. Increasing awareness about breast cancer among women and in the general population is the main goal of this breast cancer blog.

Lung cancer blog: Lung cancer blog is managed by Scott with the help of other bloggers. Through this blog Scott and his friends constantly remind the readers about the dangers of smoking. It's a never-ending struggle against this miserable disease with which a social stigma of smoking is associated.

Colon cancer blog: Colon cancer blog is run by Sue and other bloggers. Sue brings a personal touch to the colon cancer blog since her mother died of colon cancer few years ago. She writes about stories, research news and advances in treatment related to colon cancer.

Prostate cancer blog: Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among American men. American Cancer Society estimates that over 230,000 new cases of prostate cancer occur in the United state every year. This important blog about prostate cancer is run by Mark and other bloggers. This blog brings news, stories, and other personal observations related to prostate cancer.

Medicineworld.org publishes a diabetes watch blog and this blog is run by JoAnn other bloggers. This diabetes watch blog brings you the latest in the field of diabetes. This includes personal stories, advances in diagnosis and treatment, and other observations about diabetes. Improving awareness about diabetes is an important mission of this group.

Janet      

Jan 16, 2006

Exercise Reduces Risk Of Pregnancy Induced Diabetes

Exercise Reduces Risk Of Pregnancy Induced Diabetes
Doing regular exercise before and during pregnancy may prevent you from having a pregnancy-induced diabetes, which is also known gestational diabetes.

These findings are from a recently published study, which appeared in the medical journal Epidemiology. Gestational diabetes affects more than 7 percent of pregnancies and is associated with harmful effects on the fetus and mother-to-be, according to the authors of the study in the

Babies born to mothers with gestational diabetes may be abnormally large, may suffer from jaundice, low blood sugar and low calcium, and may experience traumatic births, they explain, while women with gestational diabetes are more likely to become diabetic after pregnancy.

This study was conducted by Dr. Carole B. Rudra and colleagues from the University of Washington. These researchers examined the relation between gestational diabetes and "perceived exertion" in lean and overweight women. They did this, in part, by asking the women how they would rate their level of exertion during usual exercise in the year before becoming pregnant.

The investigators found that the higher the level of perceived exertion, the lower was the risk of pregnancy-related diabetes. Women reporting very strenuous usual exertion were 81 percent less likely to develop gestational diabetes compared with women reporting negligible or minimal exertion. Women reporting moderate usual exertion had a 59 percent risk reduction compared with women reporting negligible or weak exertion.

JoAnn      Permalink


Jan 11, 2006

Life-style Modifications Quick To Give Benefits

Life-style Modifications Quick To Give Benefits
It only takes three weeks, to start getting benefits from changing your lifestyle. Researchers have shown that those overweight individuals with diabetes, who are willing to modify life-style need not wait too long to derive benefits from his or her life-style modifications.

Researchers say that contrary to widespread belief, Type 2 diabetes and metabolic syndrome can be reversed and corrected solely through lifestyle modifications. Lifestyle modifications may not have reversed damage such as plaque development in the arteries, but, if Type 2 diabetes continues to be controlled, further damage would likely be minimized and it's plausible that continuing to follow the program long-term may result in reversal of cholesterol deposit in the arteries.

It is important and interesting to realize that these changes occurred in the absence of any significant weight loss. This finding challenges the traditional wisdom that an individual has normalized their weight before achieving health benefits.

These study results are published in the recent issue of the Journal of Applied Physiology. This interesting study enrolled 31 men who ate a high-fiber, low-fat diet with no limit to the number of calories they could consume. The participants of the study were required to perform 45-60 minutes of aerobic exercise per day on a treadmill.

Fifteen of the participant had metabolic syndrome (excessive abdominal fat, insulin resistance, and blood fat disorders such as high levels of triglycerides), thirteen of the participants had Type 2 diabetes.

JoAnn      Permalink


Jan 9, 2006

Diabetic Drugs May Cause Blurry Vision

Diabetic Drugs May Cause Blurry Vision
The Food and Drug Administration and manufacturer of two popular drugs Avandia and Avandamet have recently announced the use of these drugs could lead to serious side effects. This warning jointly issued by the federal agency and the manufacturer GlaxoSmithKline state that use of these drugs could lead to blurry vision due to swelling in the retina of the eye and swelling of the legs and feet,

The company however issued a statement stating that these serious side effects can occur but are very rare. The company says it has received such very rare reports of new or worsening diabetic macular edema in diabetic patients who have taken Avandia or Avandamet. Macula is the most important part of the retina and is responsible for the strong vision was you are focusing.

The company in a letter to the doctors says that the majority of those patients also reported peripheral edema, or swelling of the legs, ankles and feet. In some cases, stopping treatment or reducing the dose eliminated or improved the condition, the letter added.

Both Avandia and Avandamet contain the drug rosiglitazone. This is a very popular drug among diabetics. An estimated 6 million people worldwide have taken either drug.

JoAnn      Permalink


Jan 6, 2006

Cinnamon For Treatment Of Diabetes?

Cinnamon For Treatment Of Diabetes?
Researchers from Malaysia say that they have found new proof that cinnamon can relieve diabetes by lowering sugar levels. As per the researchers, a three-year study carried out by the Universiti Teknologi Malaysia showed that the spice has positive effects on Type II diabetes.

Cinnamon is an important ingredient of Indian style cooking. Research chief Mohammad Roji says that herbalists all over the world used cinnamon to treat diarrhea and arthritis because of its ability to improve circulation, heal wounds and prevent ulcers and allergies.

"In the last decade, laboratory studies have also revealed that cinnamon extract mimicked insulin action in the cells," he said, according to the daily.

Cinnamon is a small evergreen tree which usually grows to a height of 10-15 meters. Cinnamon belongs to the family Lauraceae, native to Sri Lanka and Southern India. The bark of this tree is the main part used as spice.

Cinnamon is principally employed in cookery as a flavouring material, being largely used in the preparation of some kinds of desserts, chocolate and spicy candies and liqueurs. In the Middle East, it is often used in savory dishes of chicken and lamb.

In America, cinnamon and sugar are often used to flavor cereals and fruits, especially apples. It can also be used in pickling. In medicine it acts like other volatile oils and once had a reputation as a "cure" for colds. It has also been used to treat diarrhea and other problems of the digestive system.

JoAnn      Permalink


Jan 4, 2006

Newly Diagnosed With Diabetes?

Newly Diagnosed With Diabetes?
So you now know that you've got diabetes. Well after the preliminary alarm you're fixed with dealing with the routine changes that come with your diagnosis. When you go into the circumstances knowing that this isn't the last part but only the commencement of a new chapter in your life it gives you a better outlook on life.

Obviously your new way of life will require a few changes. First and foremost your physician should have put you on a new diet. Depending on type of diabetes you have, you might even have to take insulin shots, ouch!! Calm down, things are going to recover only if health is being managed correctly.

Your new diet will consist of foods with lower calories that would improve the level of blood glucose even before any weight loss. Certainly, there's a downside, but your quality of life should go up inestimably.

Exercise can aid you to manage your weight and reduce your blood sugar level. Walking and swimming are good exercises for diabetics.

Every organ of your body is affected if diabetes reaches an uncontrollable level. However there is an organ which can be used to control diabetes and it is 'The mind'. The glucose level in the blood reduces automatically when stress, depression and hostility are controlled by the mind.

All in all you should be in steady contact with your doctor and nutritionist while you are still in the initial stage of the disease. They'll give you a grand start and be there for you as you shift into your new life.

JoAnn      Permalink


Jan 3, 2006

Increased activity reduces Risk of Diabetes

Increased activity reduces Risk of Diabetes
When I was bearing my first child I was found to have pregnancy-induced diabetes. This kind of diabetes automatically generally gets cured after delivery. But the doctors cautioned me that I have to keep myself on regular check ups as the chances of becoming diabetic again is high after the fifth year of delivery. But now I am still absolutely normal. I got inspiration from reading the results of a recent study, which states that people who are physically active live longer and spend more years free of diabetes than people who are inactive. I thought I would share the story with you.

Dr. Wilma J. Nusselder from Erasmus Medical Center in Rotterdam, the Netherlands and colleagues report that the effect of physical activity on life expectancy in people with no diabetes reflects both the lower incidence of diabetes and the lower mortality of non-diabetic individuals because of increased physical activity. They found that at age 50, life expectancy free of diabetes is 2.3 years longer for moderately active individuals and at least 4 years longer for highly active individuals.

The study also illustrates that life expectancy with diabetes is approximately 0.5 years less for moderately active people and 0.1 years less for highly active people compared with their inactive counterparts.

"Our study suggests that if sedentary people could be stimulated to be at least moderately active, they could extend their lives and increase their life-time spent without diabetes," say the researchers.

Emily      Permalink


Jan 3, 2006

Coronary Plaque Detection By Molecular Imaging

Coronary Plaque Detection By Molecular Imaging
Now it may be possible to detect those atherosclerotic coronary artery plaques that are about to be ruptured by a molecular technique as per a published study in the Journal of Nuclear medicine.

Considering the fact that about 14 million people in the United States are having coronary artery disease, this is very exciting news. More than two-thirds of acute coronary events result from rupture of coronary plaques. These plaques that are about to rupture are likely to large lipid (fat) collections, which are often associated with hemorrhages and harbor significant inflammation.

Researchers used radiolabeled protein annexin A5 for the noninvasive imaging of atherosclerotic plaques in experimental rabbit models and found the radiotracer uptake had a significant correlation with inflammatory cell prevalence and the magnitude of cell death in plaques.

The study's findings "allow us to propose that stabilization of these plaques is a possibility," he said. This supports "the paradigm of prevention rather than therapy of a coronary event," said Artiom Petrov, Ph.D one of theco-authors of the study.

Daniel      Permalink


Jan 1, 2006

Alcohol Cuts The Risk Of Diabetes

Alcohol Cuts The Risk Of Diabetes
Women who are over 50 years may get protection from developing diabetes if they take up to 3 alcoholic drinks per week. Researchers have found that these women who drank alcoholic beverages were much less likely to develop type-2 diabetes compared to women who never drank alcohol.

For those women who consume more alcohol, the benefit appears to diminish. This research comes from scientists at the Utrecht University Medical Centre in Holland, who studied more than 16,000 women aged between 49 and 70 who were free of diabetes.

After six years, they found that 760 women had developed type 2 diabetes When they examined alcohol use, they found that women who had five to 30g of alcohol per week were much less likely to develop diabetes. Ten grams is a standard drink.

Dr Michiel Bots, who led the study, said: 'Our findings support the evidence of a decreased risk of type 2 diabetes with moderate alcohol consumption and expand this evidence to older women.'

JoAnn      Permalink





Dec 29, 2005

How high-fat diet causes diabetes?

How high-fat diet causes diabetes?
Scientists from Howard Hughes Medical Institute scientists have discovered a molecular that links between a high-fat, developments of type 2 diabetes. These initial studies were done in mice, which showed, a high-fat diet disrupts insulin production, resulting in the typical symptoms and signs of type 2 diabetes.

Findings of these researchers are published in a recent issue of the journal Cell. They report that knocking out a single gene encoding the enzyme known as GnT-4a glycosyltransferase (GnT-4a ) disrupts insulin production. Researchers also reports that a high-fat diet suppresses the activity of this enzyme and leads to type 2 diabetes due to failure of the pancreatic beta cells.

This new finding, offering explanation regarding the link between high-fat diet and development of type-2 diabetes may aid in the development of new drugs that specifically target this enzyme. Researchers believe that in earliest phases, the disease causes failure of insulin-secreting beta cells in the pancreas, which leads to elevated blood glucose levels. As the disease progresses, the insulin-secreting beta cells overcompensate for the elevated blood glucose, and eventually pump out too much insulin. This leads to insulin resistance and full-blown type 2 diabetes.

This enzyme GnT-4a was known to maintain glucose transporters on the surface of beta cells in the pancreas. The new studies showed that in the absence of sufficient GnT-4a enzyme, Glut-2 lacks an attached glycan that is mandatory for it to be expressed at the cell membrane. Without that glycan, Glut-2 leaves the cell surface and becomes internalized, where it can no longer transport glucose into the cell. In turn, this failure impairs insulin secretion, causing type-2 diabetes in the mice.

JoAnn      Permalink


Dec 28, 2005

Poor Outcome For Pneumonia In Diabetics

Poor Outcome For Pneumonia In Diabetics
Compared to non-diabetics, patients who have diabetes do poorly if they develop pneumonia as per a new article published in the medical journal Chest. And to add to this is the fact that pneumonia is more common in diabetics than non-diabetics the authors write.

Dr. Miquel Falguera and colleagues from Hospital Universitari Arnau de Vilanova, Lleida, investigated whether the clinical features of pneumonia, or the causative microorganisms and outcomes, are modified by the presence of diabetes. These researchers have found that diabetics had more severe forms of pneumonia, and more often required hospitalization compared to non-diabetic patients.

The risk of dying from pneumonia was higher in diabetics compared their counter part non-diabetics. It's not because the microorganisms causing the pneumonia are more virulent or powerful but because the diabetic patients tend to have more associated illnesses compared to non-diabetics.

"Our results suggest that this adverse outcome is more attributable to the underlying circumstances of patients than to uncommon microbiological findings," the authors conclude.

JoAnn      Permalink


Dec 27, 2005

Weight Loss Strategies For Pre-Diabetics

Weight Loss Strategies For Pre-Diabetics
Adults with pre-diabetes can lose up to 3 percent of their body weight using diet, exercise and behavioral strategies, according to a systematic review of studies that analyzed weight-loss strategies for pre-diabetics.

Weight loss is recognized as one of the better ways to keep pre-diabetes from turning into full-blown diabetes, experts say.

In their examination of nine studies that included a total of 5,168 participants, Susan L. Norris, M.D., M.P.H., of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and colleagues found that pre-diabetics using weight-loss interventions could drop between 2 and 3 kilograms, or four to six pounds, in one to two years. The review is published in the American Journal of Preventive Medicine.

"Although the weight loss demonstrated in this review is small, even modest loss in general populations may have health benefits," Norris says.

People with pre-diabetes have impaired glucose tolerance that doesn't quite rise to the level of a diabetes diagnosis, although the pre-diabetes condition can be "an important risk factor for the development of type 2 diabetes," Norris says. Pre-diabetes affects almost 12 million overweight people ages 45 to 74 in the United States.

Norris and colleagues examined nine studies on weight-loss interventions among overweight and obese people with pre-diabetes. All of the studies were randomized control trials, the "gold standard" of medical research.

Of the five studies that examined how these interventions affected the development of diabetes, three showed a significant decrease in the incidence of the disease, the researchers found.

Overall, the interventions decreased blood sugar levels, blood pressure and cholesterol levels slightly among pre-diabetics, although not significantly more than in those who did not participate in the interventions.

Pre-diabetics who had frequent contacts with the health care workers providing the diet or exercise advice and who kept up with the intervention were most likely to lose weight, Norris and colleagues conclude.

The study was supported by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

JoAnn      Permalink


Dec 26, 2005

Air Pollution Causes Atherosclerosis In Laboratory Mice

Air Pollution Causes Atherosclerosis In Laboratory Mice
Experimental results with laboratory mice illustrate a direct cause-and-effect relationship between contact with fine particle air pollution and development of atherosclerosis, usually known as hardening of the arteries.

Mice that were provided with a high-fat diet and exposed to air with fine particles had 1.5 times more plaque production than mice provided with the same diet and exposed to fresh filtered air. The study results are published in a recent issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association. The study may explain why people living in highly polluted areas have a higher risk of heart disease.

These results have significant implications for the long-term impact of fine particle air pollution on urban populations.

Fine particle pollution consists of microscopic particles of dust and soot less than 2.5 microns in diameter which penetrates deep into the respiratory tract, diminishing lung function and deteriorating conditions like asthma and bronchitis

"The average particle exposure over the course of the study was 15 micrograms per cubic meter, which is characteristic of the particle concentrations that urban area residents would be exposed to, and well below the federal air quality standard of 65 micrograms per cubic meter in a 24-hour period," said Sanjay Rajagopalan, M.D., a vascular medicine specialist and cardiologist with the Mount Sinai School of Medicine and senior author of the study.

Daniel      Permalink


Dec 25, 2005

Merry Christmas From Medicineworld.org

Merry Christmas From Medicineworld.org
Medicineworld wishes all our readers merry Christmas.

Oh, jingle bells, jingle bells
Jingle all the way
Oh, what fun it is to ride
In a one horse open sleigh
Jingle bells, jingle bells
Jingle all the way
Oh, what fun it is to ride
In a one horse open sleigh

A day or two ago
I thought I'd take a ride
And soon Miss Fanny Bright
Was seated by my side
The horse was lean and lank
Misfortune seemed his lot
We got into a drifted bank
And then we got upsot

Oh, jingle bells, jingle bells
Jingle all the way
Oh, what fun it is to ride
In a one horse open sleigh
Jingle bells, jingle bells
Jingle all the way
Oh, what fun it is to ride
In a one horse open sleigh yeah

Janet      Permalink


Dec 25, 2005

Do You Read All Of Our Medical Blogs?

Do You Read All Of Our Medical Blogs?
Do you read all of the medical blogs published by medicineworld.org? Many of our bloggers are busy keeping you updated on various medical topics. Medicieworld.org is publishing a wide variety of blogs on different topics.

Breast cancer blog: Breast cancer blog is run by Janet and colleagues. Latest post from this breast cancer blog reads as follows: Location of Breast Cancer Does Matter - Does it really matter which part of the breast you develop cancer? Researchers say yes.
Researchers from Switzerland recently reported that women with early breast cancer in the lower inner quadrant (the lower part of the breast, closer to the center of the body) are twice as likely to die of their cancer as women with cancer diagnosed in other parts of the breast. Researchers speculate this could be due to undetected spread of the cancer to the lymph nodes of the internal mammary chain (lymph nodes near the center of the chest). These lymph nodes are difficult to be evaluated for the presence of cancer.......

Lung cancer blog: Lung cancer blog is run by Scott and colleagues. Latest post from this lung cancer blog reads as follows: Cancer Death Rate Continues to Drop in U.S. - It is comforting to know that the cancer death rates continue to drop and cancer diagnosis rate continue to be stable in the United States. This is true for most of the common types of cancer including breast cancer, lung cancer, colorectal cancer and the prostate cancer. This information is released by the National Cancer Institute.......

Colon cancer blog: Colon cancer blog is run by Sue and colleagues. Latest post from this cancer blog post reads as follows: Cancer Death Rate Continues to Drop in U.S. - It is comforting to know that the cancer death rates continue to drop and cancer diagnosis rate continue to be stable in the United States. This is true for most of the common types of cancer including breast cancer, lung cancer, colorectal cancer and the prostate cancer. This information is released by the National Cancer Institute...............

Prostate cancer blog: Prostate cancer blog is run by Mark and colleagues. Latest post from this prostate cancer blog reads as follows: Cancer Death Rate Continues to Drop in U.S. - It is comforting to know that the cancer death rates continue to drop and cancer diagnosis rate continue to be stable in the United States. This is true for most of the common types of cancer including breast cancer, lung cancer, colorectal cancer and the prostate cancer. This information is released by the National Cancer Institute...............

We have a diabetes watch blog as well and this is run by JoAnn and colleagues. The latest post from this diabetes watch blog reads as follows: Health Canada Issues Warning For Avandia and Avandamet - Health Canada is issuing warnings for two commonly used drugs to treat Type-2 diabetes. The warning states that use of these drugs may lead to new cases or worsening of a vision problem called macular edema.......

Heart watch blog: Heart watch blog is run by Daniel and colleagues. The latest post from this heart watch blog reads as follows: Fish Oil Combats Heart Problem Related To Pollution - You probably can't do much to improve the air pollution around you, but now you can protect yourself from some of the harmful effects of air pollution on the heart. A new research finding suggests that daily supplementation with omega-3 fatty acid (fish oil) prevents a potentially-deadly decline in heart rate variability (HRV) associated with exposure to indoor air pollution, researchers from the US and Canada report......

Cancer blog: I manage the cancer blog with lots of help and support form other bloggers. The latest post from this cancer blog reads as follows: Pancreatic Cancer: Looking Forward To Skin Rash! - Probably you all know that a new drug combination Tarceva and Gemzar has been FDA approved recently for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. Did you know that, if you are developing a bad skin rash while on this treatment it is a good sign! I am not kidding, the study that led to the approval of this combination was presented in the American Society of Clinical Oncology meeting in 2005. This study has shown that the combination of Tarceva and Gemzar works best in patients who had a bad skin rash!......

Scott      Permalink


Dec 23, 2005

Health Canada Issues Warning For Avandia and Avandamet

Health Canada Issues Warning For Avandia and Avandamet
Health Canada is issuing warnings for two commonly used drugs to treat Type-2 diabetes. The warning states that use of these drugs may lead to new cases or worsening of a vision problem called macular edema.

Macular edema is swelling of the retina because of fluid at the back of the eye. It is more likely to occur in people with high blood pressure, poor control of their blood sugar levels or diabetic retinopathy, which is a disease of retina disease caused by diabetes.

Symptoms of macular edema include:
  • Blurred or distorted vision.
  • Decreased colour sensitivity.
  • Poorer adaptation to the dark.

People taking the drugs also had fluid retention, swelling of the extremities and weight gain.

Patients taking the tablets should not stop doing so without checking with a doctor, since an increase in blood-sugar levels could cause medical problems, the company's public advisory said.

Those diagnosed with macular edema or diabetic retinopathy should see a doctor. Regular eye checkups should be part of a comprehensive diabetes management plan, said the public advisory, which was endorsed by the regulator.

"In some cases, the visual impairment was reported to have improved or resolved following discontinuation of Avandia or Avandamet," GlaxoSmithKline said in a letter to health professionals posted on Health Canada's drug and health products website.

The letter warns doctors that both drugs "should be used with caution in patients with a pre-existing diagnosis of macular edema or diabetic retinopathy."


JoAnn      Permalink




Older blogs 1   2   3   4  

Type-2 Diabetes
Type-2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes, accounting for 90% of cases diabetes. This disease affects nearly 17 million Americans and is the seventh leading cause of death in the United States. Even though 17 million Americans have type-2 diabetes only half of these people are aware that they have diabetes. The death rate in patients with diabetes may be up to 11 times higher than in persons without the disease. The occurrence of diabetes in persons 45 to 64 years of age is 7 percent, but the proportion increases significantly in persons 65 years of age or older. Type-2 diabetes accounts for more than 90% of all diabetes worldwide.

Diabetes Watch Blog: From Medicineworld.org

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