MedicineWorld.Org
Your gateway to the world of medicine
Home
News
Cancer News
About Us
Cancer
Health Professionals
Patients and public
Contact Us
Disclaimer

Cancer Blog: From Medicineworld.org

Return to Cancer blog Main Lung Cancer Blog Colon Cancer Blog  


Cancer blog Archives   RSS content feed What is RSS feed?


Do You Read All Of Our Cancer Blogs?

Do You Read All Of Blogs?
This page you have reached is an archive page of cancer blog. If you wish to read current posting of this blog, please go to cancer blog main page. If you wish to read the archived blog postings, simply scroll down to the lower part of the page.

Do you read all of the blogs published by medicineworld.org? Many of our bloggers are busy keeping you updated on the various health related topics. We publish the following blogs at this time.

Cancer blog: I manage the cancer blog with lots of help and support form other bloggers. Through this cancer blog my friends and I try to bring stories of hope for patients with cancer. The cancer blog often republishes important blog posts from other cancer related blogs at Medicineworld.org. If you are searching for a blog that covers wide variety of cancer topics, this may be the one for you.

Breast cancer blog: Breast cancer blog is run by Emily and other bloggers and they bring you the latest stories, news and events that are related to breast cancer. Increasing awareness about breast cancer among women and in the general population is the main goal of this breast cancer blog.

Lung cancer blog: Lung cancer blog is managed by Scott with the help of other bloggers. Through this blog Scott and his friends constantly remind the readers about the dangers of smoking. It's a never-ending struggle against this miserable disease with which a social stigma of smoking is associated.

Colon cancer blog: Colon cancer blog is run by Sue and other bloggers. Sue brings a personal touch to the colon cancer blog since her mother died of colon cancer few years ago. She writes about stories, research news and advances in treatment related to colon cancer.

Prostate cancer blog: Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among American men. American Cancer Society estimates that over 230,000 new cases of prostate cancer occur in the United state every year. This important blog about prostate cancer is run by Mark and other bloggers. This blog brings news, stories, and other personal observations related to prostate cancer.

Medicineworld.org publishes a diabetes watch blog and this blog is run by JoAnn other bloggers. This diabetes watch blog brings you the latest in the field of diabetes. This includes personal stories, advances in diagnosis and treatment, and other observations about diabetes. Improving awareness about diabetes is an important mission of this group.

Janet      

Feb 15, 2006

Vitamins May Not Protect You From Prostate Cancer

Vitamins May Not Protect You From Prostate Cancer
Contrary to popular belief, taking the vitamins E and C or the nutrient beta-carotene doesn't protect against prostate cancer as per the latest government reports. In a government research report, published Tuesday in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute, the authors say that consumption of vitamins and beta-carotene may not provide protection from prostate cancer in men.

Several previous studies have yielded conflicting results on this topic, and even this new study of almost 30,000 men is not considered to be the last word on this issue. While the study showed no protective for vitamin E, the study leaves open the possibility that it might help smokers.

The primary goal of the study was to test the value of screening tests for prostate cancer. In that study they were also surveyed about their diet and what supplements they took, relying on memory, not nearly as precise as other research now under way that controls supplement doses.

The study showed that smokers were 71 percent less likely to be diagnosed with advanced disease if they had taken high doses of vitamin E for several years. But, to add to the confusion, the risk of earlier-stage cancer increased among vitamin E-using smokers.

It is known that, smoking by itself increases the risk of prostate cancer, and even if further research concludes that vitamin E somehow tempers that risk, kicking the habit would be far more protective, as per comments by Harvard University scientists in an accompanying editorial.

Mark      Permalink


Feb 15, 2006

Breast Scanner May Replace Mammography

Breast Scanner May Replace Mammography Photo: Martin Tornai, Ph.D., associate professor of radiology and biomedical engineering at Duke University Medical Center with the 3-D breast scanner (photo credit Duke University Medical Center).
Researchers at Duke University have created a new type of breast scanner that will dramatically improve their ability to visualize small tumors while also reducing radiation exposure to one-tenth that of normal mammograms. This may also provide relief from the often-painful experience of breast compression that is involved in the traditional mammograms.

These new scanner uses computed tomography (CT), which is the same technique used in obtaining a CT scan of the chest, but with a unique variation: it provides a three-dimensional image of the breast. The new scanner is capable of rotating around the breast to obtain a complete image of the breast, from the nipple to the chest wall. On the other hand, traditional mammograms provide only a two-dimensional image and they compress the breast, thereby distorting the image and causing discomfort for many women.

The Duke researchers have successfully demonstrated their new CT scanner can detect lesions as small as 5 mm in artificial breast models and in cadavers. Current threshold of detection of soft tissue tumors in mammograms are estimated to be around 1 cm, which is about the size of a marble. However mammogram can detect far smaller micro-calcifications, which could be indicators of disease.

The Duke scientists expect that this scanner would be ready for use within two years and is in the process of developing a start-up company to commercialize the device.

Traditional mammography fails to detect some tumors because it is two-dimensional and thus projects a flattened image of the breast. The compression and two-dimensional image cause overlapped tissues to obscure some tumors. With 3-D imaging, the breast is fully depicted and the contrast between normal and cancerous tissues would be more apparent.


Sherin      Permalink


Feb 13, 2006

Diabetic Hearts Make Unhealthy Switch

Diabetic Hearts Make Unhealthy Switch
The high-fat "diet" that diabetic heart muscle consumes helps make cardiovascular disease the most common killer of diabetic patients, according to a study done at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The study will appear in the February 7 issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology and is now available online.

Sixty-five percent of people with diabetes die from heart attack or stroke. When the researchers investigated fuel consumption in heart muscle, they found that heart muscle of type 1 diabetic patients relies heavily on fat and very little on sugar for its energy needs.

In contrast, heart muscle in non-diabetics doesn't have this strong preference for fat and can use either sugar (glucose) or fat for energy, depending on blood composition, hormone levels or how hard the heart is working.

"The diabetic heart's overdependence on fat could partly explain why diabetic patients suffer more pronounced manifestations of coronary artery disease," says senior author Robert J. Gropler, M.D., professor of radiology, medicine and biomedical engineering and director of the Cardiovascular Imaging Laboratory at the Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology at the School of Medicine. "The heart needs to use much more oxygen to metabolize fats than glucose, making the diabetic heart more sensitive to drops in oxygen levels that occur with coronary artery blockage."

Compared to non-diabetics, diabetic patients often have larger infarctions and suffer more heart failure and sudden death when the heart experiences an ischemic (low-oxygen) event.

JoAnn      Permalink


Feb 13, 2006

Inflammatory Reaction And Hormone Resistance

Inflammatory Reaction And Hormone Resistance
In a study led by Michael Rosenfeld and David Rose at the University of California, San Diego, the researchers have found that cell cultures that so-called macrophages--components of the innate immune system that drive inflammatory reactions--physically interact with prostate cancer cells. That interaction, in turn, reverses the activity of hormone receptors in cancer cells that respond to androgens, such as testosterone, leading to shifts in the expression of other genes. The study's co-first authors were Ping Zhu and Sung Hee Baek, also of UCSD.

"While hormone resistance can likely be acquired in multiple ways, it appears we may have uncovered a general contributor to hormone resistance in prostate cancer," Rosenfeld said.

"Hormone resistance is a particular problem in prostate cancer, where it occurs in a very high percentage of cases," Rose added. "We think we've now made a connection between inflammation and resistance to particular cancer drugs."

Androgens, acting via androgen receptors, are essential for normal growth and function of the prostate gland and have been implicated in the progression of prostate cancer. Selective androgen receptor modulators (SARMs) --drugs intended to inhibit the activity of androgen receptors--are therefore standard treatment for prostate cancer. However, prostate cancers often become resistant to such treatment. A similar, though less common, phenomenon can also occur in breast cancers treated with drugs that target the hormone receptor for estrogen.

Mark      Permalink


Feb 13, 2006

Minimally Invasive Surgery For Lung Cancer

Video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS), which is a form of minimally invasive surgical procedure for lung cancer has been shown to be as effective as open surgery with a low risk of complications and high survival rates when performed by experienced thoracic surgeons.

They shorter recovery time and hospitalization together with reduced pain and improved quality of life associate with this technique have been documented over the past decade, still it is currently used in only about five percent of the 40,000 lobectomies performed each year in the United States.

In a study published in the February 2006 issue of The Annals of Thoracic Surgery, researchers show that thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) can achieve the same results as open lung surgery. This article a follow-up of an study published in the same journal in 1998 that reported on results of video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) in 298 patients. Thoracic surgeon Robert McKenna Jr., M.D., surgical director of the Center for Chest Diseases and medical director of Thoracic Surgery and Trauma at Cedars-Sinai, is the principal investigator and senior author.

Instead of making an eight- to 10-inch incision, as is done in a typical thoracotomy, VATS requires only four small incisions through which instruments and a thoracoscope are placed. A camera lens at the tip of the scope feeds high-resolution images to a video monitor, providing the surgeon with a detailed, magnified view of the surgical site. A segment, lobe or entire lung can be removed, depending on the patient's condition and the extent of the cancer.


Scott      Permalink


Feb 13, 2006

Artificial Sweetner Increases Cancer Risk In Rats

Artificial Sweetner Increases Cancer Risk In Rats
Rats given varying doses of aspartame, which is the the second most widely used artificial sweetener in the world, experienced a statistically significant increase in the incidence of malignant tumors, lymphomas and leukemias in a study recently published by the peer-reviewed journal Environmental Health Perspectives (EHP).

"Our study has shown that aspartame is a multipotential carcinogenic compound whose carcinogenic effects are also evident at a daily dose of 20 milligrams per kilogram of body weight (mg/kg), notably less than the current acceptable daily intake for humans," the authors write. Currently, the acceptable daily intake for humans is set at 50 mg/kg in the United States and 40 mg/kg in Europe.

The authors of the study, the first to demonstrate multipotential carcinogenic effects of aspartame administered to rats in feed, called for an "urgent reevaluation" of the current guidelines for the use and consumption of this compound.

Aspartame is found in more than 6,000 products, including carbonated and powdered soft drinks, hot chocolate, chewing gum, candy, desserts, yogurt and tabletop sweeteners, as well as some pharmaceutical products like vitamins and sugar-free cough drops.

More than 200 million people worldwide consume the sweetener. It has been used for more than 30 years, having first been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 1974.

Janet      Permalink


Feb 13, 2006

Groovy Protein And Cancer

Groovy Protein And Cancer Image credit and copyright: Howard Hughes Medical Institute
Scientists have determined the detailed structure of an essential piece of the telomerase enzyme, an important contributor to the vast majority of human cancers. Understanding the physical shape of the protein has led to a better understanding of how it acts to immortalize cells - and should help scientists design broadly effective cancer drugs.

Until now, the lack of detailed structural information about the enzyme has hindered progress in developing agents to inhibit it, say the researchers, who published their findings in an advance online publication in Nature Structural and Molecular Biology on February 5, 2006. Howard Hughes Medical Institute President Thomas R. Cech, whose laboratory is at the University of Colorado at Boulder, led the study, conducted with colleagues Steven A. Jacobs and Elaine R. Podell.

Cancer researchers have long sought a way to subdue telomerase, an enzyme whose excessive activity contributes to the unchecked growth of as many as 90 percent of human tumors. The enzyme is vital for some rapidly dividing cells - such as those in a developing embryo - where it extends telomeres, the regions of highly repetitive DNA found at the ends of chromosomes. In most healthy adult cells, telomerase is shut off, and telomeres slowly shrink during cell division - a normal process that helps limit cells' lifespan. Cancer cells, however, usually find a way to turn telomerase back on, achieving a dangerous immortality.

Source: Howard Hughes Medical Institute

Janet      Permalink


Feb 13, 2006

More Likely To Be Diagnosed With Breast Cancer In Summer

More Likely To Be Diagnosed With Breast Cancer In Summer
[imgl]/images/blog/summer-woman-654580.jpg[/imgl]Scientists have observed that woman generally tend to have diagnosis of breast cancer in spring and summer months compared rest of the year. They believe that this is due to the fact that women are more aware of their body in these months due to skimpier clothes in the warmer weather. This would make them more aware of their body and in turn they examined themselves more often.

Researchers in Manchester combed through the records of 9,500 women who had been diagnosed with breast cancer in the North-West since 2001. They evaluated the date of diagnosis of these women.

These researchers were surprised to find that rates of breast cancer detection soared by about 25 per cent between April and July. It is to be noted that these women's cancers were not detected through the National Screening Programme which involves screening mammogram for those women who are aged more than 50 but were younger women who had gone to their general practitioner because of their own concerns about breast cancer.

This interesting study was lead by Professor Gareth Evans who is an oncologist and consultant in medical genetics at both Christie Hospital-and St Mary's Hospital in Manchester.

Source: Daily Mail; London (UK)

Sherin      Permalink


Feb 10, 2006

Hormonal Therapy Of Prostate Cancer Could Be Lead To Diabetes, Heart Disease

Hormonal Therapy Of Prostate Cancer Could Be Lead To Diabetes, Heart Disease
Hormone therapy is the first best option for patients with recurrent prostate cancer. Hormone therapies is usually used to block testosterone production in an effort to halt or slow the growth of the tumor. New research suggests that hormone therapy may have its own toll. Hormone therapy may put these men at increased risk for developing insulin resistance and elevated blood sugar levels. This in turn can affect heart health.

Doctors say that hormone therapy may lead to high rate of heart disease in men with prostate cancer as per findings of this research published in the journal Cancer.

Dr. Shehzad Basaria from Johns Hopkins University say that heart disease is one of the most common causes of death in men with prostate cancer. In a study of 53 men with prostate cancer, the researchers found that those treated with hormonal therapy for at least one year were more resistant to the action of insulin, and had higher glucose levels than men who had only received local surgery and or radiation and had normal testosterone levels, and age-matched healthy men with normal testosterone levels.

According to the study, 44 percent of men in the hormone therapy group had blood sugar levels greater than 126, which is among the criteria for the diagnosis of diabetes. In contrast, only about 12 percent of men in the other groups had blood sugar levels this high.

Mark      Permalink


Feb 10, 2006

Cancer Death Rate Finally Falls

Cancer Death Rate Finally Falls
For the first time in 70 years the cancer death rate has actually declined in the United States. This may be an indication that we are winning the war on cancer and this point in time may very well represent a dramatic turning point in the history of cancer.

As per results are from a recently completed review of U.S. death certificates by the National Center for Health Statistics, the number of cancer deaths decline to 556,902 in 2003, down from 557,271 the year before. This is the first time in the last 70 years the cancer death rate is showing a declining trend.

The medical community is welcoming this declining trend in the cancer death rate, and attributed it to the development of newer strategies and treatments for cancer.

The war on cancer has not always gone well in the public's eyes. Despite decades of scientific research, marked progress in the screening techniques and treatment modalities cancer therapy remained harsh and total deaths continued to rise till now.

For more than a decade, health statisticians have charted annual drops of about 1 percent in the cancer death rate, the calculated number of deaths per 100,000 people. But the actual number of cancer deaths still rose each year because the growth in total population outpaced the falling death rates.

Experts are attributing the success to declines in smoking, and the earlier detection and more effective treatment of tumors. Death rates have fallen for lung, breast, prostate and colorectal cancer, according to American Cancer Society officials, who analyzed the federal death data.

Janet      Permalink


Feb 9, 2006

Linda Nolan Has Breast Cancer

Linda Nolan Has Breast Cancer
Former pop singer and West End stage star Linda Nolan has been diagnosed with breast cancer. Nolan, who is 46 years old, who was diagnosed with breast cancer last week told reporters that it was shocking and is still trying to adjust the reality. Yet she is trying to be as positive as possible

Nolan said: "I know this is something that affects so many women and like them, all I can do is stay as positive as possible."

Spokeswomen for the singer confirmed that Nolan is due to start her treatment. Dublin-born. She said: "I can confirm that, yes, Linda has got breast cancer and she will be going into treatment."

Nolan made her stage debut at the age of four and the family act eventually achieved international success, touring Europe with Frank Sinatra, and with their own BBC TV Specials.

In her solo career, she has toured with Gene Pitney, and was voted Female Vocalist of the Year in 1990 for her cabaret show.

Nolan has been married to Brian Hudson, her manager, since 1981 and the couple live in London.


Janet      Permalink


Feb 9, 2006

Vitamin D May Inhibit Prostate Cancer

Vitamin D May Inhibit Prostate Cancer Yi-Fen Lee, Ph.D.
Vitamin D may have the ability to inhibit the spread of prostate cancer cells by limiting the activity of two specific enzymes as reports University of Rochester Medical Center researches.

This may mean that vitamin D could provide beneficial treatment to prostate cancer patients with high levels of testosterone enzyme.

This research was conducted by Yi-Fen Lee, Ph.D., who is an assistant professor of Urology at the Medical Center and her colleagues and is published in the journal Carcinogenesis.

Past research has suggested that vitamin D suppresses the progression of cancer. This new research has demonstrated that vitamin D significantly limits the ability of prostate cancer cells to invade healthy cells by reducing the activity of two enzymes, proteases called matrix metalloproteinase and cathepsin. Vitamin D also increases the level of counterpart enzymes that inhibit matrix metalloproteinase and cathepsin, the Rochester scientists found.

The researchers did not find any effect of vitamin D on plasminogen activators, which also are important in the spread of prostate cancer. Researchers in this study used 1,25-hydroxylvitamin D3, the most potent and active form of vitamin D in the human body. But Lee and other researchers advised against taking large amounts of vitamin D because it may be associate of the side effects.

Source: University of Rochester

Mark      Permalink


Feb 8, 2006

Coffee May Not Reduce Cancer Risk

Coffee May Not Reduce Cancer Risk
Remember this blog posting from Nov 14, 2005, in which I wrote that coffee drinking may protect you from colorectal cancer.

Now researchers say that more evidence of no link between coffee and colorectal cancer.
According to Swedish study drinking as much as six cups of coffee per day has no effect on the risk of colon or rectal cancer.

Researchers say that case-control studies, mainly based in Europe, have linked more coffee to less colorectal cancer, with a meta-analysis of 12 such studies reporting high coffee consumption could reduce the risk by 28 per cent. This result has not been backed up by prospective cohort studies.

This new study, which is published on-line in the American Journal of Epidemiology, used data from two population-based cohort studies: the Swedish Mammography Cohort (61,433 women) and the Cohort of Swedish Men (45,036 men).

From 1987-1990 and followed through 2004, 1,279 cases of colorectal cancer were diagnosed. The volunteers drank an average of three cups of coffee per day, half a cup less than the US average.

Although the researchers recorded that the people who drank the most coffee were also more likely to be smokers and to use multivitamin supplements much less, there was no link between coffee drinking and the cancer.

No comment could be given on different types of coffee however, but claims that decaffeinated coffee is very uncommon in Sweden led the scientists to limit their claims to filtered coffee.

Sue      Permalink


Feb 7, 2006

How Broccoli May Protect You From Cancer

How Broccoli May Protect You From Cancer
Make broccoli a part of your everyday diet. This may protect you from cancer. A chemical found in vegetables such as broccoli, cauliflower and cabbage might boost DNA repair in cells that may have undergone damage. Previous research has shown a link between these foods and a reduced cancer risk. Now a new research is showing how these vegetables might decrease your risk of cancer.

These research findings are published in the latest issue of the British Journal of Cancer.

The protective effects of broccoli and other vegetables are attributable to the presence of a compound called I3C. During the normal process of growth and development DNA damages may occur. It is vital to repair these genetic defects and preventing it to pass to the daughter cells at the time of cell division.

The compound that is present in broccoli and other vegetables (13C) helps in the repair of damaged DNA. BRCA1 BRCA2, are genes that make proteins that help to repair DNA damage. These proteins helps to repair the genetic defects and prevent damaged genetic information being passed on to the next generation of cells. Those who have faulty genes like BRCA1 at BRCA2 may have a high of developing breast cancer and other types of the cancer.

Cancer cells usually have very low levels of BRCA proteins, so the scientists assume that higher levels might prevent cancer from developing. Researchers say that ability of I3C to boost the amount of BRCA proteins could explain their protective effects.

Janet      Permalink


Feb 7, 2006

Eating Less Fat May Not Protect You From Cancer And Heart Disease

Eating Less Fat May Not Protect You From Cancer And Heart Disease

Eating less fat is not final solution cancer and heart disease as per findings from a recently published research. This new study has found that eating less fat later in life may not lower the risk of cancer and heart disease among older women. This is a disappointment for those who expected to have a greater benefit from a healthy diet.

These results come from a large study, sponsored by the government. A total of 48,835 women participated in this study. Researchers say that this is not the final decision regarding benefits of low fat diet.

Researchers argue that these women may have started this low-fat diet too late in their life to derive any benefit. Average age of patients participated in the study was 62 years. The researchers also point out that these women did not reduce the intake of fat as much as the diet demanded. Most of these women remained overweight during the course of the study, a major risk factor for cancer and heart problems.


This study, which has lasted eight years, showed no difference in the rate of breast cancer, colon cancer and heart disease among those who ate lower-fat diets and those who didn't.

Heart and cancer specialists said that thy were not very much surprised by the study results since scientific thinking on the role fats play in disease prevention has evolved since this study was designed. That is especially true when it comes to good and bad fats and heart disease.

Sue      Permalink


Feb 6, 2006

Lung Cancer Is More Funding

Lung Cancer Is More Funding
Lung cancer is the biggest cancer killer in the United Kigdom. Despite this grim fact, sufferers of Lung cancer are still not getting the care and attention they deserve, as per campaigners. Lung cancer activists are asking the government to do more lung cancer patients.

A recent study done by the Roy Castle Lung Cancer Foundation and Macmillan Cancer Relief showed that more than 38,000 people die from lung cancer each year in the UK. This makes lung cancer the biggest cancer killer. Despite these facts lung cancer receives just 4% of the national cancer research budget.

Lung cancer activists say the stigma linked to lung cancer, "smokers' caused this disease to themselves" means patients do not get the best support and information they need.

Everyone should remember that according to figures, one in 10 lung cancer cases are diagnosed in people who have never smoked.


Peter Cardy, chief executive of Macmillan Cancer Relief, added: "Lung cancer has been the poor relation for far too long and it's time to ensure patients get the care that they deserve.

Scott      Permalink


Feb 6, 2006

Diabetes Drugs May Increase Risk Of Cancer Death

Diabetes Drugs May Increase Risk Of Cancer Death
Drugs that are commonly used in type-2 diabetes may increase the risk of cancer as per findings from new research. Many patients with type 2 diabetes who take sulfonylureas or insulin appear to be at increased risk of dying from cancer compared with those who take metformin, as per Canadian researchers.

However, researchers say that their study is in the early stage, and it is still uncertain whether the increased risks of cancer-related mortality that were observed are related to a protective effect of metformin or deleterious effects of sulfonylurea and insulin.

Johnson and colleagues said that numerous studies have suggested an association between type-2 diabetes and cancer.

The so-called sulfonylureas increases production of insulin, while the drug metformin makes the body's existing stores of insulin more effective.

The study included 10,300 new users of metformin or sulfonylureas. Their average age was 63.

After adjustment for several factors, users of a sulfonylurea or insulin had a higher risk of cancer-related mortality than metformin users.

JoAnn      Permalink




Older blogs 1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   16  

Cancer
Cancer is a very common disease, approximately one out of every two American men and one out of every three American women will have some type of cancer at some point during the course of their life. Cancer is more common in the elderly and 77 percent of cancers occur in people above age 55 or older. Cancer is also common in children. Cancer incidence is said to have two peaks once during early childhood and then during late years in life. No age period is completely exempted from development of cancers. Some cancers occur predominantly in the elderly, other types occur in children, Cancer occurs in all ethnic races, however the cancer rates and rates of specific cancer types may vary from group to group. Late stages of cancer may be incurable in most cases, but with the advancement of medicine, more and more cancers are becoming curable.

Cancer Blog: From Medicineworld.org

Main Page| Cancer blog| Cancer blogs list| Lung cancer blog| Colon cancer blog| Prostate cancer blog| Breast cancer blog| Diabetes watch blog| Heart watch blog| Allergy blog| Bladder cancer blog| Cervical cancer blog| Colon cancer news blog| Diabetes news blog| Esophageal cancer blog| Gastric cancer blog| Health news blog| Heart news blog| Infectious disease blog| Kidney watch blog| Lung disease blog| Lung cancer news blog| Mesothelioma blog| Neurology blog| Breast cancer news blog| OBGYN blog| Ophthalmology blog| Ovarian cancer blog| Cancer news blog| Pancreas cancer blog| Pediatrics blog| Prostate cancer news blog| Psychology blog| Research blog| Rheumatology blog| Society news blog| Uterine cancer blog| Weight watch blog|

Copyright statement
The contents of this web page are protected. Legal action may follow for reproduction of materials without permission.