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Do You Read All Of Our Cancer Blogs?

Do You Read All Of Blogs?
This page you have reached is an archive page of cancer blog. If you wish to read current posting of this blog, please go to cancer blog main page. If you wish to read the archived blog postings, simply scroll down to the lower part of the page.

Do you read all of the blogs published by medicineworld.org? Many of our bloggers are busy keeping you updated on the various health related topics. We publish the following blogs at this time.

Cancer blog: I manage the cancer blog with lots of help and support form other bloggers. Through this cancer blog my friends and I try to bring stories of hope for patients with cancer. The cancer blog often republishes important blog posts from other cancer related blogs at Medicineworld.org. If you are searching for a blog that covers wide variety of cancer topics, this may be the one for you.

Breast cancer blog: Breast cancer blog is run by Emily and other bloggers and they bring you the latest stories, news and events that are related to breast cancer. Increasing awareness about breast cancer among women and in the general population is the main goal of this breast cancer blog.

Lung cancer blog: Lung cancer blog is managed by Scott with the help of other bloggers. Through this blog Scott and his friends constantly remind the readers about the dangers of smoking. It's a never-ending struggle against this miserable disease with which a social stigma of smoking is associated.

Colon cancer blog: Colon cancer blog is run by Sue and other bloggers. Sue brings a personal touch to the colon cancer blog since her mother died of colon cancer few years ago. She writes about stories, research news and advances in treatment related to colon cancer.

Prostate cancer blog: Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among American men. American Cancer Society estimates that over 230,000 new cases of prostate cancer occur in the United state every year. This important blog about prostate cancer is run by Mark and other bloggers. This blog brings news, stories, and other personal observations related to prostate cancer.

Medicineworld.org publishes a diabetes watch blog and this blog is run by JoAnn other bloggers. This diabetes watch blog brings you the latest in the field of diabetes. This includes personal stories, advances in diagnosis and treatment, and other observations about diabetes. Improving awareness about diabetes is an important mission of this group.

Janet      

Jan 19, 2006

Fabricated Cancer Study: Is There Anything Worse?

Fabricated Cancer Study: Is There Anything Worse?
A large study concluding that anti-inflammatory drugs reduce the risk of oral cancer was based on fabricated data, according to The Lancet, the prominent British medical journal that published the report last year.

The principal author was Jon Sudbo, a cancer researcher at the Norwegian Radium Hospital in Oslo. He had four co-authors at M. D. Anderson Cancer Center in Houston and another at Weill Medical College of Cornell University in New York.

In the Lancet paper, Dr. Sudbo said he received financing from the National Cancer Institute in Bethesda, Md. The news agency Agence France-Presse said the amount was $10.5 million.

A spokeswoman for the institute said yesterday that she could not confirm it had provided the financing. She noted that $10 million was a minute slice of the agency's budget.

Officials at the Norwegian Radium Hospital told The Lancet they had information that the data was manipulated, the journal's editor, Richard Horton, wrote in its current issue.

Dr. Sudbo is away on sick leave, according to Agence France-Presse. His American co-authors declined to comment, but their institutions both said in statements that they were not involved in the Norwegian hospital's investigation.

Sherin      Permalink


Jan 18, 2006

Compound Related To Vitamin A Fights Lung Cancer

Compound Related To Vitamin A Fights Lung Cancer
A compound, which is a relative of vitamin A may be the next weapon in the fight against lung cancer. New research shows promise of lung cancer tumor progression or slowing of the growth using this compound in mice.

This research was led by Dr. Ming You, director of the Chemoprevention Program at the Siteman Cancer Center at Washington University. Dr.You and his colleagues found that this compound, called bexarotene, is effective in prevention of lung cancer cells in mouse. They also found that this compound doesn't cause the severe skin irritations that have limited the use of other vitamin A derivatives in cancer therapies.

The ideal substance to prevent cancer would block tumor growth without causing unpleasant or dangerous side effects. In other studies, bexarotene showed some promise in cancer treatment. It extended survival in patients with non-small cell lung cancer, the most common type of lung cancer and one that has a five-year survival rate of less than 5 percent when diagnosed at the advanced stage.

In the current study, to be published in an upcoming issue of Oncogene, You, who is also professor of surgery, and Dr. Yian Wang, associate professor of surgery and their colleagues showed that lung-cancer-susceptible mice receiving non-toxic doses of bexarotene ended up with fewer and smaller benign and malignant tumors than mice that were not treated with bexarotene.

The researchers saw a reduction of almost 50 percent in terms of total amount of tumor in mice who were given bexarotene for 12 weeks after the animals had already developed benign tumors following injection of a lung carcinogen. Bexarotene also inhibited the progression of benign to malignant tumors by about 50 percent. The mice were engineered to have the genetic alterations seen in human lung cancers, so they readily develop lung cancer when given known lung carcinogens.

Scott      Permalink


Jan 18, 2006

Protein Provides Clues To Leukemia Progression

Protein Provides Clues To Leukemia Progression
New research findings are providing critical and very much needed insight into the cancer promoting role of one so called "oncoprotein" is providing critical new insight into the mechanisms of leukemia progression and may help in the evaluation of new drugs to treat acute myeloid leukemia (AML), researchers said.

In the past researchers have tried to investigate this oncoprotein, called CBFB-SMMHC, in mice but it was not successful due to inability of mouse fetus to survive the expression of this gene. For this study, researchers at the U.S. National Institutes of Health and elsewhere created mice that is capable of surviving the gene expression of CBFB-SMMHC.

They found that the oncoprotein induces abnormal preleukemic blood cell progenitors -- stem cell-like cells that can become blood cells.

On average, mice developed AML within about five months of having the CBFB-SMMHC gene turned on, the researchers said.

It was already known that CBFB-SMMHC is present in about 12 percent of AML cases and that this oncoprotein interferes with the process of normal blood cell development.

These findings published in the January issue of the journal Cancer Cell.

Janet      Permalink


Jan 18, 2006

The Diabetes Colon Cancer Connection

The Diabetes Colon Cancer Connection Beautiful night view of Singapore
Diabetes may be linked to increased risk of developing colon cancer. It has been shown in the Western population that the presence of diabetes is associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer, and now there is more evidence from the east. A new study done in Chinese population residing in Singapore has just shown the same result.

Ethnic group of Chinese population living in Singapore was selected for this study because, the body type and lifestyle of residents are different from people living in Western countries. Chinese population in this area tends to be lean and less heavy compared to the western population. Dr. Adeline Seow, from the National University of Singapore, and colleagues led this study which showed a link between diabetes and colorectal cancer.

This study involves more than 60,000 people, and the results are published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. These participating subjects provided detailed dietary, medical, and lifestyle information and then were followed for several years to assess the occurrence of colorectal cancer and related risk factors.

In this study population of 60,000 people a total of 636 cases of colorectal cancer occurred during follow-up. When the researchers analyzed these results in detail, they found that a subset of men and women with a history of diabetes were 50 and 40 percent, respectively, more likely to develop colorectal cancer than their peers without diabetes.

Sherin      Permalink


Jan 16, 2006

Turmeric Could Halt Prostate Cancer

Turmeric Could Halt Prostate Cancer
Turmeric is a yellow spice used widely in Indian style cooking. Recently some US researchers have shown that curcumin, an active compound found in turmeric, helped stop the spread of breast cancer tumour cells in mice. A more recent research now shows that turmeric holds real potential for the treatment and prevention of prostate cancer, particularly when used in combination with certain vegetables.

These reserchers tested turmeric, along with phenethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC), a naturally occurring substance particularly abundant in a group of vegetables that includes watercress, cabbage, winter cress, broccoli, Brussels sprouts, kale, cauliflower, kohlrabi and turnips. They found that this combination was found to be very effective in prevention of prostate cancer. Researchers claim that a combination of PEITC and curcumin could be effective in treating established prostate cancers.

These results are published in the Jan. 15 issue of the journal Cancer Research by Kong and his colleagues at Rutgers' Ernest Mario School of Pharmacy.


The authors noted that in contrast to the high incidence of prostate cancer in the United States, the incidence of this disease is very low in India. This has been attributed to the dietary consumption of large amounts of plant-based foods rich in phytochemicals - nonnutritive plant chemicals that have protective or disease-preventive properties.

Consequently, scientists have been investigating intervention options based on compounds found in edible and medicinal plants. They have had some success, and a majority of patients with prostate cancer are now combining the conventional therapies with these compounds as alternative, supplementary or complementary medications.

For Kong's study, researchers used mice bred so that their immune systems would not reject foreign biological material and injected the mice with cells from human prostate cancer cell lines to grow tumors against which the compounds could be tested.

Mark      Permalink


Jan 16, 2006

Processed Meat Increases Colon Cancer Risk

Processed Meat Increases Colon Cancer Risk
Your risk of development of colon cancer may be directly related to the quantity of processed meat you are eating. Those who eat a lot of processed meats may have a higher risk of developing polyps, which are pre-cancerous growths in the colon.

Researchers, Dr. Douglas J. Robertson of the VA Medical Center in White River Junction, Vermont and colleagues found that among 1,520 adults with a history of colon polyps, those who ate a diet heavy in processed meats had a higher risk of polyp recurrence than those with the lowest intake. On the other hand, patients who favored chicken had a lesser risk of new polyps than those who ate the least.

Colon polyps are growths that, while usually benign, can become cancerous. Patients in the current study had all had polyps removed and were then followed for 4 years to detect any recurrences.

Overall, the one-quarter of patients with the highest intake of processed meat were 75 percent more likely to develop an advanced polyp compared with the one-quarter of patients who ate the least processed meat, the researchers found.

Patients who ate the most fruit, vegetables and whole grains were, however, less likely to develop polyps in the upper part of the colon. Red meat, meanwhile, was not linked to polyp risk.

Despite that latter finding, the overall results are in line with advice to eat red and processed meats sparingly, Robertson and his colleagues write.

Sue      Permalink


Jan 16, 2006

Cadmium Lung Cancer Connection

Cadmium Lung Cancer Connection
Exposure to cadmium may occur in professions related to welding. The adverse health effects of cadmium are well established. It was suspected that workers who have been exposed to cadmium might have increased risk of developing lung cancer. Previously animal studies have shown a link between exposure to cadmium and development of cancer.

For the first time, now researchers have proved the first direct link between the build-up of industrial emissions of cadmium in the environment and lung cancer.

A Belgian study, published today on the Lancet website, is the first to link the accumulation of cadmium in the environment with higher rates of cancer.
The researchers followed nearly 1,000 people living in Northeast Belgium since 1985. Half lived in areas close to three zinc smelters where exposure was high while the others lived in low exposure areas. By June 2004 19 had died of lung cancer; 15 of them lived in the high exposure areas.

The Belgian study traced cadmium levels in the soils of the participant's gardens and measured their urine to calculate the build-up of cadmium in their bodies. The metal accumulates in the body over time, particularly in the kidneys.

The study, authored by Jan Staessen at the University of Leuven in Belgium, concluded: "We have shown a significant association between risk of lung cancer and environmental exposure to cadmium. To our knowledge, this is the first time such an association has been reported in an environmentally exposed population."

Scott      Permalink


Jan 16, 2006

Older Women May Have Poor Outcome With Breast Cancer

Older Women May Have Poor Outcome With Breast Cancer
Breast cancer may have different behavior in older and younger women. A new study has shown that older women are much more likely to die from breast cancer compared to younger women. This study from University of Uppsala in Sweden showed that, those aged 70 to 84 years had up to a 13 percent lower chance of surviving breast cancer than those aged 50 to 69 years.

These findings are the results of 5 year follow up on a larger group of 9,000 women. Differences in diagnosis and treatment, rather than the presence of other illnesses, are sited as the main reason for this disparity in survival rates by the researchers.

They found that breast cancer diagnosis was often made later in older women and, once diagnosed, they were less likely to be fully investigated for their cancer and had less aggressive treatment than younger women, the study said.


Older women had larger tumors at the time of diagnosis and were less likely to have their cancer detected by mammography screening and to have the stage of disease identified. The older women also had fewer lymph nodes examined and had radiotherapy and chemotherapy less often than younger breast cancer patients, the study said.


The study also found that older patients were less likely to be offered breast-conserving surgery, but more likely to receive hormone treatment, such as tamoxifen, even if their tumors did not show signs of hormone sensitivity.

Sherin      Permalink


Jan 16, 2006

Common Painkiller Cut Ovarian Cance Risk

Common Painkiller Cut Ovarian Cance Risk
Do you always hear bad things about taking painkiller medications? Doctors may say that painkillers are bad for your stomach, kidney and liver. Now a group of researchers say that they are good to prevent ovarian cancer.

In the study, women who used a group of drugs called NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs) such as ibuprofen or naproxen were 28 percent less likely to develop ovarian cancer than were nonusers of NSAIDs. The risk reduction was strongest with aspirin, which showed a marked risk reduction of 37 percent.

This study, which was published in the medical journal Epidemiology, involved 586 women with ovarian cancer and 627 controls who were surveyed about painkiller use during the preceding 5 years. Women who regularly used painkillers for at least 3 months were classified as users, while all other women were considered nonusers.

Risk reduction with drugs like Tylenol that contain acetaminophen (also known as paracetamol) was slightly less at 22 percent.

As to how NSAIDs might cut the risk of ovarian cancer, that it probably "involves antiinflammatory effects." For acetaminophen, the mechanism is less clear, but the fact that another study also showed a benefit with acetaminophen use "suggests it is a real finding", Schildkraut said the lead author o f the study from Duke University,

Sherin      Permalink


Jan 16, 2006

Overweight May Be Associated With Poor Breast Cancer Outcome

Overweight May Be Associated With Poor Breast Cancer Outcome
Breast cancer patients who are overweight may have somewhat poorer survival odds than leaner women with the disease. The findings, from a study of breast cancer patients in China, mirror those of some studies in Western countries, where excess weight has been linked to a greater risk of dying from the disease.

The study included 1,455 Chinese women who were followed for roughly five years after being diagnosed with breast cancer.

While most women were still alive after five years, those who were overweight at the time of diagnosis or soon afterward had a poorer survival rate.

Eighty percent of overweight women were still alive versus 86.5 percent among the leanest women and 84 percent among those who were slightly heavier but still in the normal weight range.

The link between body weight and survival remained when the researchers considered important factors in death risk, such as age, tumor size at diagnosis and the type of treatment patients received.

It's not fully clear why excess weight might lower a woman's chances of surviving breast cancer, but Shu's team points to a number of possibilities. Some studies have found that obese women tend to be diagnosed at later stages in the disease -- though, in this study, overweight women had poorer survival even when their cancer was caught early.

Another theory is that excess body fat, by boosting levels of estrogen, testosterone and other hormones, helps speed the growth and spread of breast tumors. Some studies have also linked excess weight to a higher risk of developing breast cancer in the first place, and the hormonal effects of extra body fat are suspected of playing a role.

Shu said, in general, moderate exercise and a diet rich in fruits, vegetables and whole grains are key.

Janet      Permalink


Jan 12, 2006

Unraveling The Mysteries Of Cancer Spread

Unraveling The Mysteries Of Cancer Spread
There is a thin line where the tumor meets the normal tissue and this is the most vital part, where important interactions occur between the normal tissue and cancer cells. Cancer cells that meet the normal tissue gets signals instructing them to Tumor cells that border normal tissue receive signals that give them clear instruct them to leave the tumor and travel through the body, resulting in the formation of deadly metastatic tumors in other locations.

In a recent study, which was published in the journal Developmental Cell, researchers from the Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis is trying to unravel the mysteries of the cancer spread. They focus on the importance of a tumor's environment. These researches also provide more information about the process of metastasis.

Ross L. Cagan, who is an associate professor of molecular biology and pharmacology, and his colleagues created tumors in fruit fly eyes and wings and then observed the behavior of individual tumor cells in those settings.

They found that the tumor cells in direct contact with normal cells had a different behavior than cells further inside the tumor. These tumor cells located at the junction of the tumor and normal cells were exclusively the ones that tended to leave the cancer tissue and travel.

These cancer cells that left the tumors in the fruit flies eventually succumbed to natural programmed cell death or apoptosis. Researchers explain that this was not unusual. These researchers are hoping that this new finding may lead to novel techniques for preventing development of metastatic behavior in these tumor boundary cells.

Sherin      Permalink


Jan 12, 2006

Gamma Knife Surgery Improves Survival

Gamma Knife Surgery Improves Survival
Gamma knife, or radio-surgery is a method of treating brain tumors with focused radiation beams. Until now it was considered a palliative treatment meaning that is was only thought to improve symptoms. Now there is evidence to suggest that many patients can survive for years after undergoing effective gamma knife radio-surgery for cancers that have spread to the brain.

Radio-surgery is shown to be capable of extending survival by 13 months or longer, depending on the tumor type. These conclusions come from a recent research conducted by Dr. Douglas Kondziolka and colleagues from the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pennsylvania. The study included 44 patients who survived more than four years after undergoing radiosurgery to determine clinical and treatment patterns that affect the outcome. These patients who have undergone gamma knife surgery had an average life span of 68 months with some patients living as long as 156 months so far.

Researchers have found those patients who survived more than four years after radio-surgery had higher pre-treatment scores on physical functioning and had fewer metastases, and less cancer in other parts of the body than those patients who died soon after radio-surgery.

Sherin      Permalink


Jan 12, 2006

What's The Chance You Can Be A Mother Again?

What's The Chance You Can Be A Mother Again?
My friend Cathy was diagnosed with breast cancer at an early age of 37. She had one of those breast cancer associated genes called BRCA1. Cathy had involvement of one of fifteen lymph nodes that were removed at the time of her lumpectomy. She had undergone chemotherapy that lasted for about 6 months and now she is on a hormonal drug to prevent the recurrence of breast cancer. Cathy was premneopausal prior to the chemotherapy, but the chemotherapy has stopped her menstrual periods. She wants to to have one more baby when all this breast cancer treatment is over, but her menstrual period has not restarted now four years after completion of chemotherapy.

Women like Cathy are not alone. Many young women are diagnosed with breast cancer each year and many of them have not completed their families and would like to have children after the treatment is complete. This naturally raises the question of preserving fertility after breast cancer treatment.

A new research from Duke University Medical Center has shown a way to predict development of infertility after chemotherapy. Researchers say that ovarian hormone levels may predict which women are likely to become infertile after chemotherapy to treat breast cancer.

This is an important finding in the fact that this may enable the treating physician to identify those women who are high risk for development of ovarian failure after chemotherapy so that preventive measures may be implemented as per the lead author of the study Carey Anders, M.D.

These researchers have shown that women who developed premature ovarian failure had lower levels of the ovarian hormone called inhibin A prior to initiation of chemotherapy and six months after chemotherapy had ended. Another ovarian hormone called inhibin B was also showed similar low pattern in women who would develop ovarian failure.

Sherin      Permalink


Jan 11, 2006

New Protein Marker To Predict Breast Cancer Outcome

New Protein Marker To Predict Breast Cancer Outcome
Researchers have found a new protein marker that can predict the outcome in breast cancer. Presence of this new marker protein called, alpha-basic-crystalline in the breast tumor may indicate poor survival in breast cancer as per researchers Vincent Cryns and colleagues at Northwestern University.

It would be good if we can know with certainty how a woman's breast cancer is going to behave in future. Researchers have been trying to find genes and proteins that can predict the outcome of breast cancer, with the main idea of classifying breast cancer into low risk and high-risk groups. At this time we do not have a good method to classify low risk and high-risk breast cancer patients and as result most of the patients receive toxic chemotherapies.

A new predictive test that was introduced recently called Oncotype-Dx testing makes some progress in this regard. This test can predict a woman's risk of breast cancer recurrence in the next 10 years. Test is useful in borderline circumstances when treatment decision about chemotherapy is in question. Newer tests are introduced and when they are available we may be able to predict with accuracy if a woman with breast cancer would require chemotherapy.

Coming back to the point, these researchers have been examining the genes expressed during breast cancer in order to classify those genes into groups that can reliably predict the outcome of disease. These researchers found that a protein that is found in some breast cancer tumors called alpha-basic-crystallin, predicts poor survival in breast cancer. This predictive value of alpha-basic-crystalline was independently of other known prognostic markers.

Alpha-basic-crystallin is overexpressed in mammary epithelial cells and causes dysregulated growth, changes in cell structure, diminished programmed cell death, and the formation of invasive carcinomas that is linked to activation of the ERK/MAPK signaling pathway. Researchers say that these new findings may facilitate research and development of tailored therapies that are active against this signaling pathway.
This study appears in the recent issue of Journal of Clinical Investigation.

Sherin      Permalink


Jan 10, 2006

Shorter Radiation Therapy For Breast Cancer

Shorter Radiation Therapy For Breast Cancer Beads like this are used in brachytherapy
Radiation therapy for breast cancer is a prolonged process and anyone who has gone through that radiation therapy knows that more than anything it's the monotonous prolonged duration of treatment that causes fatigue and metal strain to breast cancer patients than anything else associated with this treatment.

A friend of mine had been diagnosed with breast cancer recently. She had a small lump (about 1 inch in size) and had no lymph nodes involved. After lumpectomy she had this extended course of radiation therapy. She said that it was never ending and seemed to last forever. She was literally counting the days, and couldn't wait for those days to be over.

There is good news to believe that radiation therapy may get a little easier for thousands of breast cancer patients in the near future. Researchers are now able to target the radiation beams just at the tumor site instead of the whole breast, cutting the usual six-week treatment down to five days.

The effectiveness of this type of radiation therapy has to be proven by controlled clinical trials. A major clinical trial is under way to prove the effectiveness of this new mode of radiation therapy and if it is effective, who's a good candidate and which of three five-day methods works best.

There is another way of giving radiation therapy and it is called brachytherapy. Some researchers from Canada are trying to develop a one-day treatment method by permanently implanting radiation seeds inside the breast to kill cancer cells. This brachytherapy treatment is also used in other cancers like prostate cancer.

This new technique is called partial-breast radiation and this is already fast gaining in popularity even before the effectiveness of this form of radiation therapy is proven by clinical trials. There is an ongoing National Cancer Institute-funded study to see if this form of radiation therapy works, and this study is recruiting patients since March.

Experts are warning women that, at this time there is no proof for the effectiveness of this type of radiation therapy and the say that women must carefully weigh the new options. If a woman is interested in this shorter course of radiation therapy, then the best course of action would be enrolment into a clinical trial.

Sherin      Permalink


Jan 9, 2006

Acrylamide Does Not Cause Colon Cancer

Acrylamide Does Not Cause Colon Cancer
Remember all that media frenzy about acrylamide in fried snacks last year. The media has given a lot of space for the possible link between acrylamide and cancer. Now there is information from a new research finding is available that suggest that all that noise and fury were probably for nothing.

Acrylamide is present in cooked and especially fried snacks like potato chips, pretzels and popcorn. This new study from Harvard medical center has shown that dietary intake of acrylamide does not appear to be associated with colorectal cancer at least in women.

"There has been considerable discourse about whether exposure to acrylamide in foods could increase the risk of human cancer," Dr. Lorelei A. Mucci, of Harvard Medical School, Boston, and colleagues write in the International Journal of Cancer.

"Acrylamide is classified as a probable human carcinogen, and animal studies have demonstrated an increased incidence of tumors in rats exposed to very high levels."

Mucci and colleagues examined the association between acrylamide in food and the risk of colon and rectal cancers using data from the Swedish Mammography Cohort, which included 61,467 women enrolled between 1987 and 1990. It's the first large, forward-looking study to investigate this relationship.

After reviewing the data The researches fond no association between acrylamide intake and the risk of colorectal cancer. Comparing the highest and the lowest intake of acrylamide, the risk for any form of colorectal cancer varied by no more than 10 percent, Mucci's team reports.

"In light of the null findings of this and other research, an important question is why the epidemiologic data on dietary acrylamide thus far seem to contradict data from animal experiments and risk assessment models," they add.

Although no single study can provide the final answer on the effects of acrylamide, the researchers point out, this and other studies "suggest that acrylamide intake in the amounts taken in through the diet do not increase the risk of colorectal cancer."

Sue      Permalink


Jan 9, 2006

Jury Rules Asbestos Link From Welding Rods To Mesothelioma

Jury Rules Asbestos Link From Welding Rods To Mesothelioma Digital Rectal Examination
This case has been pending in New York State appeals court for some time, but on Dec. 29th in a first-ever jury finding that asbestos-containing welding rods, sold in the billions up to the early 1980's, had caused lung cancer and mesothelioma. Attorney Jerome H. Block of the nationally known mass toxic tort law firm of Levy Phillips and Konigsberg has recently made this announcement.

This New York Supreme Court, Appellate Division, First, upheld the July 2003 jury verdict in favor of, Angel Gomez, who died following the trial, and the late Daniel Tucker. Both men worked with and around asbestos-containing welding rods. The jury awarded Gomez a total of approximately $3.19 million against Lincoln Electric Company. Jury however, reduced 25 percent of the compensation percent since Gomez was a cigarette smoker. Tucker's estate was awarded a total of approximately $3.5 million split between Lincoln and Hobart Brothers Company.

The welding rods at issue in the Gomez and Tucker cases continue to be a top-selling, all-purpose welding rod. Up to the early 1980s, these rods were coated with a mixture containing 5% to 15% asbestos, according to trial testimony.

Scott      Permalink


Jan 9, 2006

Does Screening For Prostate Cancer Saves Lives?

Does Screening For Prostate Cancer Saves Lives? Digital Rectal Examination
The debate over the reason to screen males for prostate cancer continues. Adding to this debate. two widely used screening tests for prostate namely digital rectal examination (DRE) and PSA testing does not save lives as per a new study.

This was a small study, which included only 1,002 men, and for the same reason will not be the final word on this controversy. Nevertheless, this may hint at what lies in the lead when the results of two large studies of prostate cancer screening appear in a few years.

The researchers looked at these two common screening tests that are performed millions of times a year in the United States: PSA, and a DRE.

A co-author of the study, Dr. John Concato, said that for now, doctors should tell men that screening tests for prostate cancer are not perfect, and men should decide for themselves whether to get screened.

The reason why there is no benefit in screening may be due to the fact that some cases of prostate cancer can be so slow-growing that they never cause symptoms, much less death. Treatment for these slow growing tumors using surgery or radiation can cause incontinence and impotence. So for some men, detecting prostate cancer early through screening can do more harm than good.

The results of PSA may be ambiguous results. It should be remembered that most men who undergo a biopsy because they have elevated PSA levels do not have prostate cancer. On the other hand, some men with low PSA levels may present with prostate cancer.

Various medical organizations have differing opinions regarding screening of prostate cancer. But most of these recommendations suggest a benefit to screening.

Mark      Permalink


Jan 9, 2006

Fatigue After Breast Cancer Treatment

Fatigue After Breast Cancer Treatment
On December 18th I have written about a study, which showed that persistent fatigue after chemotherapy is rare. In this study only one in five women showed persistent fatigue after chemotherapy, regardless of the type of chemotherapy used. Some of these women had received regular chemotherapy while some other had received high dose chemotherapy.

I was reading a new study, which suggests somewhat different results regarding breast cancer treatment and fatigue. This study shows that fatigue may persist for five years after breast cancer treatment in almost one third of patients. In about two thirds of these patients, the fatigue will persist, the results of this long-term study indicate.

Ganz, from the University of California at Los Angeles, and her associates previously reported that 35 percent of 1,957 women who were diagnosed between with early-stage breast carcinoma between 1994 and 1997-experienced fatigue for the first five years after treatment.

The results showed that 34 percent were classified as being fatigued. Among those classified as fatigued during the first survey, 63 percent continued to score in the fatigued range.

Further analyses indicated that depression, pain and heart disease were significant long-term predictors of fatigue, as was treatment with combined radiation and chemotherapy compared with either treatment alone.

Different studies may differ to some extent, in the results, but these two studies represent just opposing results, I would say.

Sherin      Permalink


Jan 6, 2006

Novel Radiation Therapy Technique For Prostate Cancer

Novel Radiation Therapy Technique For Prostate Cancer
Brachytherapy is using Cesium-131 is a novel radiation therapy technique for the treatment of prostate cancer. Brachytherapy is different from the conventional radiation therapy. In conventional radiation therapy radiation beams are projected in to the area of the body that needs to be treated. In Brachytherapy, the urologist or radiation oncologist puts several radioactive beads in and around the prostate gland. Radiation from the radioactive beads kills or arrests the growth of the cancer with minimal damage to healthy tissue. This helps prevent incontinence and preserve the nerves that allow for erection.

Brachytherapy as such is not a new technique, but the use of Cesium-131 for brachytherapy of prostate cancer is a relatively new development. Cesium-131, which was approved in 2003 by the FDA for use in brachytherapy for prostate cancer and other malignancies, has several advantages over other radioactive isotopes. Compared to Iodine-125 and Palladium-103, which are commonly used alternatives, Cesium-131 has a higher energy, shorter half-life, and uses a lower total dose of radiation.

Compared to Iodine-125 and Palladium-103, it has a higher energy, shorter half-life, and uses a lower total dose of radiation. Cesium-131 has a half-life of about 10 days, compared to a half-life of 17 days and 60 days for Palladium-103 and Iodine-125, respectively. A shorter half-life means faster dose delivery, that cancer cells have less opportunity to repopulate, and less protracted radiation to normal healthy tissues.

Mark      Permalink


Jan 6, 2006

New Screening Combo For Colorectal Cancer

New Screening Combo For Colorectal Cancer
Stool testing for blood in the stool is getting more sophisticated. A new study has shown that use of a simple immunochemical fecal occult blood test (FOBT), in combination with the traditional guaiac FOBT is capable of accurately detecting colorectal cancer and may reduce the need for more complex and less pleasing procedure of invasive colonoscopy.

These findings are published in the recent issue of the journal Lancet Oncology.

While guaiac FOBT, which detects blood in the feces, is inexpensive and relatively easy to do, it's not very accurate and has low clinical sensitivity and specificity, because cancer is not the only cause of blood in feces, the British researchers noted. People who test positive on guaiac FOBT have a follow-up colonoscopy, which is a more expensive procedure and carries some risks, the study authors added.

Researchers propose that people who have weak or moderate positive guaiac FOBT results have a follow-up immunochemical FOBT to identify those who would be less likely to have cancer and not require a colonoscopy.

Beckman Coulter is one amongst several other companies that has introduced improved products called fecal immunochemical tests or FIT. These products are being recognized by the medical world as a more reliable way of detecting cancer and the polyps, which have the chances of developing into cancer.

Sue      Permalink


Jan 6, 2006

Lou Rawls Dies Of Lung Cancer

Lou Rawls Dies Of Lung Cancer
On December 18. 2005, I wrote about Lou Rawls, and his fight against lung cancer. Today I am writing about the sad demise of this gifted singer to lung cancer.

Lou Rawls was diagnosed with lung cancer just over a year ago. He was found to have spread of lung cancer to his brain in May 2005. In December, when I was writing that blog post, Lou Rawls was still bravely fighting his lung cancer.

Rawls is an accomplished artist and has released more than 70 albums, he has been in movies, television shows and voiced-over many cartoons. His career covered almost every form of black American music from gospel and blues to RandB, soul and jazz. He was 70 years old when he finally succumbed to lung cancer. Rawls won three Grammy awards and 13 nominations in a career that lasted more than 40 years

Rawls died at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, as per reports where he was receiving his medical treatment.

Rawls received many honors during his lifetime including having a street named after him in Chicago. Rawls recently filmed public service announcements for Hurricane Katrina relief. His last public performances were a series of three concerts he gave in San Diego in mid-November.

In 1958, while touring the South with the Travelers and Sam Cooke, Rawls was in a serious car crash, which claimed the life of one person. Rawls was actually pronounced dead before getting to the hospital where he stayed in a coma for 5 1/2 days. It took him months to regain his memory and a year to fully recuperate. Rawls considered the event life changing.

Again this is a grim reminder for all of us regarding the dangers of lung cancer and smoking.

Scott      Permalink


Jan 6, 2006

Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy Improves Survival In Ovarian Cancer

Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy Improves Survival In Ovarian Cancer
Intraperitoneal Chemotherapy Extends Ovarian Cancer Survival Intraperitoneal method for delivering chemotherapy offers women with ovarian cancer the chance to live longer than standard treatment.

In an analysis evaluating the intraperitoneal (through the abdomen) technique for delivering chemotherapy to the more commonly used intravenous chemotherapy, researchers established that average survival time for women with stage III ovarian cancer could be increased by nearly 16 months - to an average of 65.6 months - with intraperitoneal therapy.

Dr. Deborah Armstrong, an associate professor oncology and gynecology and obstetrics at Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center in Baltimore stated that this is the longest survival reported to date for advanced ovarian cancer.

Intraperitoneal chemotherapy is infused straight into the abdomen through a catheter surgically located under the skin. Armstrong said the catheter is normally placed beneath the lower left rib cage. Because the drug is going directly to the area affected by the cancer, rather than throughout the body, elevated doses of chemotherapy can often be used.

Women getting intraperitoneal chemotherapy are more likely to have side effects, such as gastrointestinal complexity, hematological troubles, infection, fatigue, pain and neurological problems. The average survival times were appreciably increased for these women.

Dr. Stephen Cannistra, director of gynecologic medical oncology at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center in Boston, wrote a supplementary editorial in the New England journal of Medicine. He said, "We are slowly but surely making progress against this terrible disease."

Janet      Permalink


Jan 6, 2006

Radiation Therapy After Breast Cancer Surgery

Radiation Therapy After Breast Cancer Surgery
Radiation therapy after lumpectomy is a standard procedure to prevent recurrence of breast cancer. Radiation therapy is also offered to women who had mastectomy, and was found to have large number of lymph nodes involved with cancer.

There has been a long controversy in the scientific community about benefits of radiation therapy after breast cancer surgery. Now it looks like this controversy is coming to an end.

A new research report published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute suggest that women who get an optimal dose of radiation therapy after mastectomy have a better survival in 10 years compared to those women, who never received radiation therapy.

These researchers from the National Health and Medical Research Council Clinical Trials Centre in New South Wales, Australia reanalyzed data from 36 clinical trials in which radiation therapy was the major difference between groups of patients. These 36 clinical trials were divided into three categories, those in which an optimal dose of radiation was used, those in which inadequate doses of radiation therapy was used, and those in which excessive doses of radiation therapy was used.

These researchers have found that in five years, patients belonging to the first category had 2.9 percent increase in survival at the end of five years. The difference increased to 6.4 percent in ten years time. The second and third categories where an optimal dose of radiation therapy was not used, there was no apparent improvement in survival.

The researchers say that this study shows that there is strong evidence for the benefits of radiation in those women who received breast cancer surgery. They recommend that post mastectomy radiation should be given to all women who have high risk of breast cancer recurrence.

Sherin      Permalink


Jan 5, 2006

Breakthrough In Stem Cell Research For Breast Cancer

Breakthrough In Stem Cell Research For Breast Cancer Image courtesy of Pravda
Are we witnessing a new breakthrough for breast cancer? That's what Francois Vaillant and colleagues are claiming. These Australian researchers say that they have discovered the stem cells responsible for growth of the mammary gland. They were able to grow new breasts in mice and claim that this could lay foundation for all new treatment options for breast cancer.

Scientists were successful in growing skin tissue from single stem cells in the past. This is the first time a complex organ like the mammary gland was grown from a one single stem cell. This study is published in the recent issue of the journal Nature.

Other researchers say that this study that comes from the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute in Melbourne is a breakthrough in understanding how normal breast tissue develops and could revolutionize the way how we treat breast cancer and other cancers.

What does it mean to you and me? Knowing the pathways of normal growth of the stem cells into the mammary gland could lead to development of new medications to treat breast cancer. Also it may be possible in future to develop a technique to grow new breast in women who had mastectomy. Researchers say that it may take next 10 or 20 years before we may develop new medications to treat breast cancer based on this new discovery.

It's a puzzle among scientific community, why women who had all the breast cancer cells eliminated by using chemotherapy could experience a recurrence of breast cancer. If all the factors controlling the growth of the stem cells go in a regulated fashion the stem cell would grow in to a normal breast tissue, but a combination of genetic errors and other external influences could cause it to generate faulty cells.

Sherin      Permalink


Jan 4, 2006

New Clinical Trial For Patients With NSCLC

New Clinical Trial For Patients With NSCLC

SNS-595 is the lead anti-cancer therapeutic drug for Sunesis Pharmaceuticals, Inc. The company has announced today that, that patient treatment has commenced in a Phase II clinical trial using this drug. This trial, which is now open to enrolment, is an open-label, multi-center study with idea of examining the safety and efficacy of SNS-595 as a second-line agent in patients with non-small cell lung cancer who have failed first-line platinum-based therapy.

This SNS-595 an apoptosis inducing drug and is claimed to be the first in this group. Patients with non-small cell lung cancer who have failed first-line treatment will be enrolled at multiple centers in the United States. Eligible patients will receive SNS-595 every three weeks at the maximum tolerated dose for heavily pre-treated patients identified in Phase I.

Scott      Permalink


Jan 4, 2006

Statins Have No Cancer Protective Effect

Statins Have No Cancer Protective Effect
Contrary to the common scientific community belief and findings from some earlier studies, statins, the popular cholesterol lowering drugs may not protect you from developing any type of cancer as per findings from two new studies.

Previous preliminary studies have shown that statins may have a protective effect in various types of cancers including breast cancer, colon cancer and prostate cancer. However a recent meta analysis of 26 studies involving 87,000 patients has concluded that statins do not lower the risk of developing cancer or dying from cancer. The drug had absolutely no impact on cancer as per the article published in Journal of the American Medical Association.

In another parallel study conducted by the American Cancer Society researchers, reviewed data on more than 130,000 patients from the United States and found that statins have no effect on colon cancer. These researchers found no difference in cancer rates between those who used statins and those who did not. Their findings are published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute's January 4 issue.


This probably would conclude the matter with statins and cancer protection. Statins are the most commonly prescribed drugs in the world. This group includes, Pfizer Inc.'s Lipitor, Merck and Co Inc.'s Zocor, Bristol-Myers Squibb's Pravachol, Merck's Mevacor and Novartis AG's Lescol.


Janet      Permalink


Jan 3, 2006

Coffee may lower breast cancer risk for some women

Coffee may lower breast cancer risk for some women
Recently I was seeing many benefits associated with coffee in the recent medical news releases. I have recently read about the benefits of coffee in prevention of colon cancer. I was reading this news about benefits of coffee in prevention of breast cancer today.

This new research by Dr. Steven A. Narod, of the University of Toronto, Ontario showed that women who have BRCA1 gene mutations might benefit from drinking coffee with respect to the risk of development of breast cancer.

These researchers studied 1690 high-risk women with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations from 40 clinical centers in four countries. A self-administered questionnaire was used to assess the average lifetime coffee consumption.

Women with BRCA mutations who drank 1 to 3 cups of coffee daily had 10 percent reduction in the risk of breast cancer, women how drank 4 to 5 cups of coffee had 25 percent reduction in breast cancer and those women who drank 6 or more cups of coffee had a high 69 percent reduction in the risk of breast cancer. Amazing to think about it, right?

Another surprising finding evolved from the research. They found that the protective effect of coffee was mainly limited to BRCA1 gene mutation carriers and most of the BRCA2 gene mutation carriers did not have significant benefit from drinking coffee.

Investigators say that coffee is an important source of phytoestrogens, which may have protective effects against cancer.

Sherin      Permalink


Jan 3, 2006

Crohn's Disease Increases Risk Of Colorectal Cancer

Crohn's Disease Increases Risk Of Colorectal Cancer
Crohn's disease is the inflammation of the digestive tract which affects a half million Americans, aged between 15 to 35 years of age. According to a new report this disease increased the risk of intestinal cancer.

Dr. Tine Jess from Herley University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark reports that the patients with Crohn's disease are at a higher risk of both colorectal and small bowel cancer.

A meta-analysis of the overall risk for colorectal cancer and small bowel cancer in Crohn's disease patients was conducted by Dr. Jess and his colleagues and this was compared with the expected risks in age- and gender- matched background populations.


The authors report that the general risk for colorectal cancer was 1.9 fold higher for Crohn's patients than for patients without Crohn's.


The high risk of colorectal cancer applied only to Crohn's disease
patients with colonic Crohn's disease or iliocolonic Crohn's disease
and not to patients whose ailment was limited to the ileum.


The researchers also note that the risk for small bowel cancer was more than 27 times higher in patients with Crohn's disease than others.

Recently immunosuppressive drugs have been introduced in the treatment of patients with Crohn's disease which is likely to reduce the risk of intestinal cancer by increasing the control of the intestinal inflammation in such patients.

Sue      Permalink


Jan 2, 2006

Do You Read All Of Our Medical Blogs?

Do You Read All Of Our Medical Blogs?
Do you read all of the medical blogs published by medicineworld.org? Many of our bloggers are busy keeping you updated on various medical topics. Medicieworld.org is publishing a wide variety of blogs on different topics.

Breast cancer blog: Breast cancer blog is run by Janet and colleagues. Latest post from this breast cancer blog reads as follows: Beware of Sharks! - As caner strikes some person, it not only exhausts the person physically and emotionally but also can also affect the person and family financially. Naturally every one of us wants to get the best price for the drugs in the market. While you can research on the Internet and often get very good deals for many of the cancer medications, you should be very careful with this process. There are sharks out there waiting for the right opportunity...............

Lung cancer blog: Lung cancer blog is run by Scott and colleagues. Latest post from this lung cancer blog reads as follows: Smokers with Family history of Lung cancer should be Screened - Researchers are urging current and former smokers who have a strong family history of lung cancer to take a lung function test and undergo screening with spiral computed tomography (spiral CT scan). If the relative was diagnosed prior to age 50 special attention has to be given to screening.......

Colon cancer blog: Colon cancer blog is run by Sue and colleagues. Latest post from this cancer blog post reads as follows: Older Colon Cancer Patients Benefit From A Caregivers - Colon cancer patients who are 65 and older may benefit from a caregiver's involvement, and caregivers may ultimately have a major impact on patients' disease management, according to a survey of oncologists commissioned by the Alliance for Aging Research.......

Prostate cancer blog: Prostate cancer blog is run by Mark and colleagues. Latest post from this prostate cancer blog reads as follows: Craig Ramsay To Undergo Prostate Cancer Surgery - Associate coach of the Tampa Bay Lightning Craig Ramsay, will have surgery to remove his prostate cancer next week.......

We have a diabetes watch blog as well and this is run by JoAnn and colleagues. The latest post from this diabetes watch blog reads as follows: Alcohol Cuts The Risk Of Diabetes - Women who are over 50 years may get protection from developing diabetes if they take up to 3 alcoholic drinks per week. Researchers have found that these women who drank alcoholic beverages were much less likely to develop type-2 diabetes compared to women who never drank alcohol.......

Heart watch blog: Heart watch blog is run by Daniel and colleagues. The latest post from this heart watch blog reads as follows: Insights Into Early Early Heart Development - Researchers at The Burnham Institute for Medical Research have provided detailed insights into the early formation of the heart. A team lead by Dr. Rolf Bodmer found that two proteins, called Robo and Slit, are required for normal development of the heart and that malfunction of either of these proteins severely impacts the heart's structure, resulting in congenital heart defects. These findings were published in the recent issue of journal Current.......

Cancer blog: I manage the cancer blog with lots of help and support form other bloggers. The latest post from this cancer blog reads as follows: Older Colon Cancer Patients Benefit From A Caregivers - Colon cancer patients who are 65 and older may benefit from a caregiver's involvement, and caregivers may ultimately have a major impact on patients' disease management, according to a survey of oncologists commissioned by the Alliance for Aging Research...............

Janet      Permalink


Jan 1, 2006

Older Colon Cancer Patients Benefit From A Caregivers

Older Colon Cancer Patients Benefit From A Caregivers
Colon cancer patients who are 65 and older may benefit from a caregiver's involvement, and caregivers may ultimately have a major impact on patients' disease management, according to a survey of oncologists commissioned by the Alliance for Aging Research.

Ninety percent of oncologists feel that caregivers have a moderate to major impact on the decision-making process. Unfortunately, only about 64 percent of colon cancer patients in this age group have caregivers' support.

"Physicians should encourage patients to enlist a caregiver and involve them in the treatment decision-making process," said Dr. Stuart Lichtman, associate attending physician at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center.

More than half of oncologists who agree that colon cancer patients 65 and older have a more difficult time managing their disease than younger patients also agree that these patients are generally less proactive about researching available treatment options. Seventy-seven percent said that such patients experienced better disease outcomes with a caregiver's involvement due to increased communication. Additionally, caregivers play an important role in providing emotional support, participating in doctors' visits and in decisions about disease management options, and providing transportation to appointments.

Sue      Permalink


Jan 1, 2006

Craig Ramsay To Undergo Prostate Cancer Surgery

Craig Ramsay To Undergo Prostate Cancer Surgery
Associate coach of the Tampa Bay Lightning Craig Ramsay, will have surgery to remove his prostate cancer next week.

Ramsay, who is 54, was diagnosed with prostate cancer in September. He has early stage prostate cancer and probably can be cured by surgery. The condition was identified in its earliest stages and Ramsay's doctors expect him to make a complete and speedy recovery, the Lightning said in a news release.

His surgery will be performed Friday at St. Joseph's Hospital in Tampa.

Ramsay will not be with the team when it begins a four-game road trip Monday against the Islanders. The Lightning hope he will be able to rejoin the team for its West Coast swing in mid-January.

Craig Ramsay is a retired professional ice hockey left winger who played in the NHL from 1971 to 1985. Ramsay was selected 19th overall by the Buffalo Sabres in the 1971 NHL Amateur Draft. He played 1,070 career NHL games, all with Buffalo, scoring 252 goals and 420 assists for 672 points.

Mark      Permalink


Jan 1, 2006

Smokers with Family history of Lung cancer should be Screened

Smokers with Family history of Lung cancer should be Screened
Researchers are urging current and former smokers who have a strong family history of lung cancer to take a lung function test and undergo screening with spiral computed tomography (spiral CT scan). If the relative was diagnosed prior to age 50 special attention has to be given to screening.

These recommendations appear in an article on familial lung cancer in the recent issue American Journal of Respiratory and Critical Care Medicine.

These authors emphasized that 85 to 95 percent of all lung cancers are attributable to cigarette smoking. The rate of lung cancer in the U.S. has dropped over the past two decades as a result of extraordinary personal and public health smoking cessation efforts. Yet, an estimated 46 million former smokers in America remain at risk for the disease, along with almost 49 million who continue to smoke. Consequently, further efforts need to be made to identify high-risk populations.

"Because cigarette smoking is such an overwhelming risk factor and preventable, the importance of family history and genetic susceptibility to lung cancer risk has been overlooked," said Dr. Schwartz.

She pointed out that individuals with a family history of lung cancer are at approximately a two- to threefold increased risk of developing the illness.

In one screening study, at least one first-degree relative had lung cancer in almost 14 percent of the 26,000 patients diagnosed with the disease.

Scott      Permalink


Jan 1, 2006

Art Therapy Can Reduce Pain In Cancer Patients

Art Therapy Can Reduce Pain In Cancer Patients
The world of arts and painting is coming to the comfort of cancer patients! If the cancer patients would paint pictures in watercolor, or sketch with charcoal, do engage in fashioning of a craft under the gentle guidance of an therapist, this can lead to significant reduction in anxiety and fatigue in cancer patients as per a new findings from a new study.

This study from scientists at Northwestern Memorial Hospital in Chicago showed that art therapy helped alleviate eight of nine symptoms in patients being treated for cancer, including pain, depression, poor appetite and fatigue.

Fifty patients with conditions that ranged from breast and colorectal cancer to leukemia and lymphoma took part in this study, which involved a one-hour art therapy session in the hospital. Most patients' cancers were incurable.

"It's not simply making art, it's not simply gluing some sequins on a piece of paper," Judith Paice, director of the hospital's cancer pain program and a study co-author, said from Chicago.

"There is really an expression that goes on and an interpretation and discussion of that expression that allows people to reframe what's happening to them, to reframe that they're in the hospital and maybe experiencing symptoms and maybe scared about their diagnosis or the future.

"The adult patients are able to express their fears, their emotions, their concerns, their wishes and their dreams in another manner," said Paice, noting that many patients find receiving counseling through art far less intimidating and stigmatizing than standard psychotherapy.

The art therapy has to be conducted by a specialist trained in both art and psychological counseling. They use the creative process to induce relaxation and give expression to a person's deepest emotions.

Janet      Permalink


Dec 31, 2005

Beware of Sharks!

Beware of Sharks!
As caner strikes some person, it not only exhausts the person physically and emotionally but also can also affect the person and family financially. Naturally every one of us wants to get the best price for the drugs in the market. While you can research on the Internet and often get very good deals for many of the cancer medications, you should be very careful with this process. There are sharks out there waiting for the right opportunity.

Go to http://www.cancercure.org/ and you can see a list of cancer medications that you can buy from this site. Also you can buy many medications and alternative therapies that can cure your cancer. They offer you FDA approved treatment of cancer that will keep you cancer free for the rest of your life.

This and a series of other pharmaceutical websites are run by a man once known in South Florida as "Big Pimpin' Pappy" who has now moved into the bogus pharmaceutical business using a Boca Raton post office box.

Arthur Vanmoor was deported to the Netherlands after pleading no contest last year to conspiracy and racketeering charges for allegedly running a lucrative and organized prostitution ring in Broward and southern Palm Beach counties.

A federal judge ordered http://www.cancercure.org/ to be shut down immediately, but it is still operational at the time of posting this blog.

Janet      Permalink


Dec 29, 2005

How high-fat diet causes diabetes?

How high-fat diet causes diabetes?
Scientists from Howard Hughes Medical Institute scientists have discovered a molecular that links between a high-fat, developments of type 2 diabetes. These initial studies were done in mice, which showed, a high-fat diet disrupts insulin production, resulting in the typical symptoms and signs of type 2 diabetes.

Findings of these researchers are published in a recent issue of the journal Cell. They report that knocking out a single gene encoding the enzyme known as GnT-4a glycosyltransferase (GnT-4a ) disrupts insulin production. Researchers also reports that a high-fat diet suppresses the activity of this enzyme and leads to type 2 diabetes due to failure of the pancreatic beta cells.

This new finding, offering explanation regarding the link between high-fat diet and development of type-2 diabetes may aid in the development of new drugs that specifically target this enzyme. Researchers believe that in earliest phases, the disease causes failure of insulin-secreting beta cells in the pancreas, which leads to elevated blood glucose levels. As the disease progresses, the insulin-secreting beta cells overcompensate for the elevated blood glucose, and eventually pump out too much insulin. This leads to insulin resistance and full-blown type 2 diabetes.

This enzyme GnT-4a was known to maintain glucose transporters on the surface of beta cells in the pancreas. The new studies showed that in the absence of sufficient GnT-4a enzyme, Glut-2 lacks an attached glycan that is mandatory for it to be expressed at the cell membrane. Without that glycan, Glut-2 leaves the cell surface and becomes internalized, where it can no longer transport glucose into the cell. In turn, this failure impairs insulin secretion, causing type-2 diabetes in the mice.

JoAnn      Permalink


Dec 28, 2005

Moderate Alcohol Use May Cut Kidney Cancer Risk

Moderate Alcohol Use May Cut Kidney Cancer Risk
As you may all know moderate drinking of alcohol is good for the heart and it decreases your risk of having a heart attack. Now a new study suggests that moderate drinking of alcohol may be effective in prevention of kidney cancer in middle-aged and older women. This study comes out from Sweden.

The chief researcher Dr. Alicja Wolk, of the Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, and team examined data on 59,237 women who were 40 to 76 years of age and cancer-free between 1987 and1990. The women had completed a food-frequency questionnaire that included questions about alcohol intake.

The study showed that women who drank at least one serving of alcohol per week had a 38 percent lower risk of renal cell carcinoma than those who drank less. For women over 55 years old, the risk was reduced even more, by 66 percent.


Janet      Permalink






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Cancer
Cancer is a very common disease, approximately one out of every two American men and one out of every three American women will have some type of cancer at some point during the course of their life. Cancer is more common in the elderly and 77 percent of cancers occur in people above age 55 or older. Cancer is also common in children. Cancer incidence is said to have two peaks once during early childhood and then during late years in life. No age period is completely exempted from development of cancers. Some cancers occur predominantly in the elderly, other types occur in children, Cancer occurs in all ethnic races, however the cancer rates and rates of specific cancer types may vary from group to group. Late stages of cancer may be incurable in most cases, but with the advancement of medicine, more and more cancers are becoming curable.

Cancer Blog: From Medicineworld.org

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