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Colon Cancer Blog: From Medicineworld.org

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Do You Read All Of Our Cancer Blogs?

Do You Read All Of Blogs?
This page you have reached is an archive page of colon cancer blog. If you wish to read current posting of this blog, please go to colon cancer blog main page. If you wish to read the archived blog postings, simply scroll down to the lower part of the page.

Do you read all of the blogs published by medicineworld.org? Many of our bloggers are busy keeping you updated on the various health related topics. We publish the following blogs at this time.

Cancer blog: I manage the cancer blog with lots of help and support form other bloggers. Through this cancer blog my friends and I try to bring stories of hope for patients with cancer. The cancer blog often republishes important blog posts from other cancer related blogs at Medicineworld.org. If you are searching for a blog that covers wide variety of cancer topics, this may be the one for you.

Breast cancer blog: Breast cancer blog is run by Emily and other bloggers and they bring you the latest stories, news and events that are related to breast cancer. Increasing awareness about breast cancer among women and in the general population is the main goal of this breast cancer blog.

Lung cancer blog: Lung cancer blog is managed by Scott with the help of other bloggers. Through this blog Scott and his friends constantly remind the readers about the dangers of smoking. It's a never-ending struggle against this miserable disease with which a social stigma of smoking is associated.

Colon cancer blog: Colon cancer blog is run by Sue and other bloggers. Sue brings a personal touch to the colon cancer blog since her mother died of colon cancer few years ago. She writes about stories, research news and advances in treatment related to colon cancer.

Prostate cancer blog: Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among American men. American Cancer Society estimates that over 230,000 new cases of prostate cancer occur in the United state every year. This important blog about prostate cancer is run by Mark and other bloggers. This blog brings news, stories, and other personal observations related to prostate cancer.

Medicineworld.org publishes a diabetes watch blog and this blog is run by JoAnn other bloggers. This diabetes watch blog brings you the latest in the field of diabetes. This includes personal stories, advances in diagnosis and treatment, and other observations about diabetes. Improving awareness about diabetes is an important mission of this group.

Janet      

Dec 7, 2005

Can You Cure Meatastatic Colorectal Cancer?

Can You Cure Meatastatic Colorectal Cancer?
Introduction of several new drugs like oxaliplatin, irinotecan, avastin, and erbutex, is bringing excitement into the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer. The excitement has reached a point in the physician community, and now they are talking about actually curing some of the patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

I have a friend, who is an oncologist, and we were talking yesterday over dinner about the advances in the treatment of colorectal cancer in the last 5 years or so. Prior to this period there was only one chemotherapy drug, Flurouracil (5-FU), was available for treatment of patients with colorectal cancer. Then came a string of new drugs and this has changed the outlook on the management of colorectal cancer forever. With the introduction of these new drugs survival in colorectal cancer patients have doubled.

Metastatic colorectal cancer is considered to be an incurable disease, and the doctors had a negative approach to the treatment of colorectal cancer due to lack of effective chemotherapy drugs. Now it has changed and they are talking about curing some of these patients with metastatic colorectal cancer.

Patients who have one or three metastatic lesions limited to organs like liver or lung are generally considered to be eligible curative approach. The first step is surgical removal of the metastatic lesions. Surgery is followed by combination therapy using some of the newer chemotherapy drugs like oxaliplatin and targeted therapies like avastin.

It is interesting to note that use of avastin in Israel is approved only for those who are potentially eligible for this curative approach.

Treatment options are expanding at a fast pace in the field of cancer treatment and I would not be surprised if this beast is tamed and shackled before the end of next decade or so.

Sue      Permalink

Dec 5, 2005

Number Of Lymph Nodes Removed At Surgery Related To Survival

Number Of Lymph Nodes Removed At Surgery Related To Survival
As always your chance of colon cancer survival is depended upon your surgeon. The more experience your surgeon is having with the procedure better is your chance of curing the cancer.

Patients with colorectal cancer undergoing surgery with the intention of cure often undergo removal of the lymph nodes from the adjacent area. Some surgeons remove number lymph nodes and some others remove less number of lymph nodes. Well, it looks like the number of lymph nodes removed at the time of surgery has an inverse relationship to survival; meaning that, the more lymph nodes were remover better is the survival.

The study analyzed data from previous clinical trial of adjuvant chemotherapy for colorectal cancer. Researchers found that on the average the patients were 64 years old and on an average 11 lymph nodes were removed at surgery. For patients who had more than 15 lymph nodes removed had a better survival compared to patients who had less than 10 lymph nodes removed.


Sue      Permalink




Dec 2, 2005

Female Smokers At Greatest Risk Of Colorectal Cancer

Female Smokers At Greatest Risk Of Colorectal Cancer
Women who smoke have a higher risk of developing colorectal cancer as per new research findings that was presented at a recent the meeting of the American College of Gastroenterology.

Researchers combed through the data from1993 to 2004 data from the IMPAC Medical Registry Services Cancer Information Resource file, a large database from more than 350 teaching and community hospitals and came up with this conclusion. Investigators from Evanston Northwestern Health Care in Chicago, Illinoise, conducted this retrospective analysis. The total database consisted of a huge 166,172 patients.

In men and women who did not smoke or drink, the ages of disease onset were 69.1 and 72.5 years, respectively. Men and women who currently smoked had a markedly earlier age of onset (66 and 65.1 years, respectively). Similarly, alcohol use was associated with an earlier age of cancer diagnosis in men and women (67.9 and 64.4 years, respectively).

This finding shows that there is genetic difference in cancer susceptibility between males and females and women were more sensitive to tobacco but not alcohol compared with men.

"Understanding interactions between genetic and environmental factors, such as smoking and alcohol, is critical for colorectal cancer risk stratifications, and will help us design effective screening strategies" says the lead author of the study Dr. Anna Zisman.

Sue      Permalink

Nov 28, 2005

Not Enough People Getting Colon Cancer Screening

Not Enough People Getting Colon Cancer Screening
This number should read as 100 percent, but sadly it only reads as 54 percent. I can only feel sorry for those folks who avoid colonoscopy, because by regular routine colonoscopy you can almost eliminate the risk of developing colon cancer by removing those polyps, which are pre-cancerous condition.

Once in three year colonoscopy screening is recommended for every adult male and female but only 54 percent of these people undergo routine colonoscopy screening.

Also, like any other type of cancer, cure rates for colorectal cancer are high when the disease is detected and treated early. Currently, it is recommended that people 50 years of age or older and those at a high risk for colorectal cancer, be screened for the disease. Screening methods include testing for blood in the stool (fecal occult blood test), sigmoidoscopy, colonoscopy, and barium enema.

To determine the extent to which primary care patients are receiving recommended colorectal cancer screening, researchers evaluated patients enrolled in a large managed care organization based in Detroit. The study involved 21,833 patients who were between the ages of 55 and 70.

The study showed that only 54% of patients received recommended colorectal cancer screening and among patients who were screened, colonoscopy was the most common screening procedure and was used by 40% of screened patients.


Sue      Permalink

Nov 27, 2005

Patients With Ulcerative Colitis Need Close Colonoscopy Follow Up

Patients With Ulcerative Colitis Need Close Colonoscopy Follow Up
Patients with ulcerative colitis are at increased risk of developing colorectal cancer. American Gastroenterology Association (AGA) and American Cancer Society (ACS) recommend regular surveillance for colon cancer through colonoscopies in these patients. This close surveillance should start eight years after development of ulcerative colitis involving the entire colon and 15 to 20 years after development of left sided ulcerative colitis.

Dr. Antoni Obrador, MD, who is the head of the gastroenterology division at Son Dureta Hospital in Palma de Mallorca, Spain, said that available data show that gastroenterologists worldwide do not adequately use widely accepted guidelines for colorectal cancer surveillance in ulcerative colitis patients in their clinical practice.

The recommendations also note that there should be a reduction in screening time intervals with increasing disease duration. Random biopsies of multiple areas of the colon and rectum have to be obtained at the time of this surveillance colonoscopy.

Dr. Obrador pointed out that studies in the US and New Zealand found that only about 20 percent of gastroenterologists were able to correctly identify dysplasia which is a pre-malignant condition, while a study in the Netherlands found that only about one-fourth of gastroenterologists complied with guidelines for colorectal cancer screening in ulcerative colitis patients.

Sue      Permalink

Nov 27, 2005

Do You Read All Of Our Cancer Blogs?

Do You Read All Of Our Cancer Blogs?
Do you read all of the medical blogs published by medicineworld.org? Many of our bloggers are busy keeping you updated on various medical topics. Medicieworld.org is publishing a wide variety of blogs on different topics.

Breast cancer blog: Breast cancer blog is run by Janet and colleagues. Latest post from this breast cancer blog reads as follows: Two New Drugs May Be Highly Effective In Breast Cancer - Two new drugs in pipeline for the treatment of breast cancer may be the magic bullet for breast cancer. Preliminary studies show that a combination of these two drugs is highly effective in killing cancer cells. Seventy five percent of breast cancer tumor cells in mice were killed by the combination. The new drug combination also suppressed the re-growth of tumors.......

Lung cancer blog: Lung cancer blog is run by Scott and colleagues. Latest post from this lung cancer blog reads as follows: Death Of Chris Whitley From Lung Cancer - I am quoting directly from http://www.chriswhitley.com/......

Colon cancer blog: Colon cancer blog is run by Sue and colleagues. Latest post from this cancer blog post reads as follows: High-fat Dairy Food May Decrease Colorectal Cancer Risk - Eat lots of diary foods! That may be the latest message for those of us who are trying to prevent colorectal cancer. In those who make a habit of eating large amounts of high-fat dairy foods and conjugated linoleic acid (a component of dairy foods), may have a reduced risk of colorectal cancer according to Dr. Susanna C. Larsson from Karolinska Institute, Stockholm.......

Prostate cancer blog: Prostate cancer blog is run by Mark and colleagues. Latest post from this prostate cancer blog reads as follows: Does Prostate Cancer Affect Employment? - A new study published in the Journal of National Cancer Institute is answering just this question. The study comes from Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center and it shows that men with prostate cancer were 10 percent less likely to be working six months after their cancer diagnosis than men without the disease, but that after 12 months, the gap in employment status closed.......

We have a diabetes watch blog as well and this is run by JoAnn and colleagues. The latest post from this diabetes watch blog reads as follows: Does Aspartame Cause Cancer? - When it comes to pop, I always go to shelf and grab the diet product no matter it is Pepsi, Coke or Sprite. My thinking is that if a sweetener can fool my tongue, why add more calories. I know many of you are with me in this regard, but may be we may think for a second before we stretch our hands to get the next can of pop. Why?......

Heart watch blog: Heart watch blog is run by Daniel and colleagues. The latest post from this heart watch blog reads as follows: Aggressive Lowering Of LDL-cholesterol May Offer Limited Benefits - Patients who have had a heart attack and are usually treated with high doses of a statin drugs. This may offer only limited benefits as per a study published in the recent issue of Journal Of American Medical Association (JAMA).......

Cancer blog: I manage the cancer blog with lots of help and support form other bloggers. The latest post from this cancer blog reads as follows: Do power lines cause cancer? - Arguments are heating up between Scottish and Southern Energy in Scotland and the area residents over a proposed high voltage power line. The controversy started when the Scottish power company, SSE, has applied for permission to run a chain of 600 pylons 220 kilo-meters (about 144 miles) from Beauly, near Inverness, to Denny, near Stirling.......

Janet      Permalink

Nov 23, 2005

High-fat Dairy Food May Decrease Colorectal Cancer Risk

High-fat Dairy Food May Decrease Colorectal Cancer Risk
Eat lots of diary foods! That may be the latest message for those of us who are trying to prevent colorectal cancer. In those who make a habit of eating large amounts of high-fat dairy foods and conjugated linoleic acid (a component of dairy foods), may have a reduced risk of colorectal cancer according to Dr. Susanna C. Larsson from Karolinska Institute, Stockholm.

In a recent report in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition Larsson and colleagues are trying to unlock the mysteries associated with the long-term consumption of high-fat dairy foods and the rate of colorectal cancer among more than 60,000 women between 40 and 76 years old who participated in the Swedish Mammography Cohort.

Those women who consumed at least four servings per day of high-fat dairy foods had a 41-percent lower risk of colorectal cancer compared to those women who consumed less than one serving of high-fat dairy foods per day as per this report.

This relationship between diary foods and colorectal cancer was not related to other lifestyle habits of the participants. The relationship was demonstrable even after accounting for such variables as alcohol consumption, family history of colorectal cancer, smoking, physical activity, and the use of multivitamin supplements, aspirin, oral contraceptives, and postmenopausal hormones.

Further analysis of the data identified a relationship between levels of high-fat dairy food in the diet and extent of colorectal cancer risk, with each additional two servings of high-fat dairy foods reducing the risk of colorectal cancer by 13 percent.

The lowest risk of colorectal cancer was associated with high consumption of cheese, the results indicate.

Sue      Permalink

Nov 21, 2005

Increase Fat Levels May Increase The Risk Of Colorectal Cancer

Increase Fat Levels May Increase The Risk Of Colorectal Cancer
Adiponectin is an insulin insulin-sensitizing hormone secreted by fat cells. Esther K. Wei, Sc.D., of the Channing Laboratory at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, and his colleagues have found that lower plasma levels of adiponectin, is associated with a increased risk of colorectal cancer.

Levels of adiponectin are inversely associated with body fat (that is, people with higher amounts of body fat tend to have lower circulating levels of adiponectin), and low levels of adiponectin are associated with insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia.

The researchers studied plama adiponectin levels of 179 men in the Health Professionals Follow-up Study who developed colorectal cancer with those of 356 men who did not develop cancer.

men with the highest plasma adiponectin levels had a lower risk of developing colorectal cancer than men with the lowest plasma adiponectin levels. The inverse association remained even after adjusting for various measures of body fatness and other colorectal cancer risk factors. The authors conclude that more studies--particularly in women, who tend to have higher circulating levels of adiponectin than men--are needed to fully understand the relationship between adiponectin and carcinogenesis.

Sue      Permalink

Nov 20, 2005

Better Than Expected Results Using Panitumumab In Colon Cancer

Better Than Expected Results Using Panitumumab In Colon Cancer
An experimental drug from Amgen called Panitumumab is showing promise in colon cancer as per the manufactures. Amgen has recently announced that a new study using Panitumumab has shown results which were better than expected.

The study has shown that Panitumumab, significantly slowed tumor growth in patients with advanced colon cancer who had failed various other types of therapies.

Amgen said that a phase 3 study, which included 463-patients has shown a 46% decline in the tumor progression rate in patients taking Panitumumab, as compared to those who received palliative care, which includes various treatments except chemotherapy drugs. This phase 3 data for Panitumumab monotherapy was better than the company's target for a 33% drop in tumor growth. The company may be applying for Food And Drug Administration approval of this drug in the near future.

The company also states that Panitumumab has significantly increased the progression free survival in these patients.

If you wish to read more about this topic you may visit this page Panitumumab significantly improves progression free-survival

Sue      Permalink

Nov 17, 2005

Colon Cancer Screening Less Beneficial Above 70 Years

Colon Cancer Screening Less Beneficial Above 70 Years
It would seem rational that screening for cancers in their earliest, most curable stages would be more beneficial for the patients. But while the lives of some people over 70 could be saved by screening, for others the potential for damage associated with screening could outweigh the benefits.


"Colorectal cancer screening is associated with both risks and benefits," Dr. Cynthia W. Ko from the University of Washington, Seattle, told Reuters Health.


Dr. Ko said that the goal behind this analysis is to make the patients and health care providers aware of both the risks and benefits of colorectal cancer screening. The older patients with significant comorbidities are less likely to benefit from this screening.


The researchers have identified four groups who would not be benefited from colorectal cancer screening. Men who are 75 to 84 years old with poor health condition; men above 85 years with average or poor health; women with poor health in the age group of 80 to 89 years; and women above 90 years with average or poor health. The researchers have noted that the risk of complications altered with the screening method of colon cancer.


Dr. Ko has concluded by saying that the decision to pursue screening should be individualized and the life expectancy, comorbidity and preference of the patient should also be taken into account.


Sue      Permalink


Colorectal cancer
Colorectal cancer is a malignant tumor that arises from the inner wall of the large intestine or rectum. Colorectal cancer is the third commonest cancer diagnosed in the United States. Each year over 100,000 people are diagnosed with colorectal cancer in the United States. Most, of these cancers develop from growths in the colon called polyps. Removal of these polyps can prevent colon cancer.

Colon Cancer Blog: From Medicineworld.org

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