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Colon Cancer Blog: From Medicineworld.org

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Do You Read All Of Our Cancer Blogs?

Do You Read All Of Blogs?
This page you have reached is an archive page of colon cancer blog. If you wish to read current posting of this blog, please go to colon cancer blog main page. If you wish to read the archived blog postings, simply scroll down to the lower part of the page.

Do you read all of the blogs published by medicineworld.org? Many of our bloggers are busy keeping you updated on the various health related topics. We publish the following blogs at this time.

Cancer blog: I manage the cancer blog with lots of help and support form other bloggers. Through this cancer blog my friends and I try to bring stories of hope for patients with cancer. The cancer blog often republishes important blog posts from other cancer related blogs at Medicineworld.org. If you are searching for a blog that covers wide variety of cancer topics, this may be the one for you.

Breast cancer blog: Breast cancer blog is run by Emily and other bloggers and they bring you the latest stories, news and events that are related to breast cancer. Increasing awareness about breast cancer among women and in the general population is the main goal of this breast cancer blog.

Lung cancer blog: Lung cancer blog is managed by Scott with the help of other bloggers. Through this blog Scott and his friends constantly remind the readers about the dangers of smoking. It's a never-ending struggle against this miserable disease with which a social stigma of smoking is associated.

Colon cancer blog: Colon cancer blog is run by Sue and other bloggers. Sue brings a personal touch to the colon cancer blog since her mother died of colon cancer few years ago. She writes about stories, research news and advances in treatment related to colon cancer.

Prostate cancer blog: Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among American men. American Cancer Society estimates that over 230,000 new cases of prostate cancer occur in the United state every year. This important blog about prostate cancer is run by Mark and other bloggers. This blog brings news, stories, and other personal observations related to prostate cancer.

Medicineworld.org publishes a diabetes watch blog and this blog is run by JoAnn other bloggers. This diabetes watch blog brings you the latest in the field of diabetes. This includes personal stories, advances in diagnosis and treatment, and other observations about diabetes. Improving awareness about diabetes is an important mission of this group.

Janet      

Jan 20, 2006

New Test To Detect Colon Cancer

New Test To Detect Colon Cancer
Japanese researchers have found a new method for diagnosing colon cancer by isolating colon cells that are naturally passed with stool.

In developing the technique the researchers have predicted that when cells were exfoliated from the walls of the colon "the cancer cells would likely survive for a long time in feces".

Matsumura, of the National Cancer Center Hospital East, Kashiwa City and his colleagues tested the feasibility of using this notion to assess feces from 116 patients with colorectal cancer and from 83 healthy volunteers.

To isolate the colon cells from fecal samples, the scientists used magnetic beads covered with antibodies that latch on to proteins on the surface of the cells. The specimens are diluted and the beads added, after which a magnet pulls out the bead-attached cells.

When the colon cells were retrieved, atypical cells were detected in 28 percent of the cancer patients and none of the volunteers, the team reports in the medical journal Gastroenterology.

Upon DNA analysis, genetic alterations were seen in cells from 82 of the cancer patients, but from only 10 of the volunteers without cancer.

Given these encouraging findings, Matsumura said that his group is planning to compare their method of colon cancer screening with the well-known fecal occult blood test, to determine its accuracy "in a real screening population and to verify its clinical usefulness and medical economics".

Sue      Permalink


Jan 18, 2006

The Diabetes Colon Cancer Connection

The Diabetes Colon Cancer Connection Beautiful night view of Singapore
Diabetes may be linked to increased risk of developing colon cancer. It has been shown in the Western population that the presence of diabetes is associated with an increased risk of colorectal cancer, and now there is more evidence from the east. A new study done in Chinese population residing in Singapore has just shown the same result.

Ethnic group of Chinese population living in Singapore was selected for this study because, the body type and lifestyle of residents are different from people living in Western countries. Chinese population in this area tends to be lean and less heavy compared to the western population. Dr. Adeline Seow, from the National University of Singapore, and colleagues led this study which showed a link between diabetes and colorectal cancer.

This study involves more than 60,000 people, and the results are published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. These participating subjects provided detailed dietary, medical, and lifestyle information and then were followed for several years to assess the occurrence of colorectal cancer and related risk factors.

In this study population of 60,000 people a total of 636 cases of colorectal cancer occurred during follow-up. When the researchers analyzed these results in detail, they found that a subset of men and women with a history of diabetes were 50 and 40 percent, respectively, more likely to develop colorectal cancer than their peers without diabetes.

Sherin      Permalink


Jan 16, 2006

Processed Meat Increases Colon Cancer Risk

Processed Meat Increases Colon Cancer Risk
Your risk of development of colon cancer may be directly related to the quantity of processed meat you are eating. Those who eat a lot of processed meats may have a higher risk of developing polyps, which are pre-cancerous growths in the colon.

Researchers, Dr. Douglas J. Robertson of the VA Medical Center in White River Junction, Vermont and colleagues found that among 1,520 adults with a history of colon polyps, those who ate a diet heavy in processed meats had a higher risk of polyp recurrence than those with the lowest intake. On the other hand, patients who favored chicken had a lesser risk of new polyps than those who ate the least.

Colon polyps are growths that, while usually benign, can become cancerous. Patients in the current study had all had polyps removed and were then followed for 4 years to detect any recurrences.

Overall, the one-quarter of patients with the highest intake of processed meat were 75 percent more likely to develop an advanced polyp compared with the one-quarter of patients who ate the least processed meat, the researchers found.

Patients who ate the most fruit, vegetables and whole grains were, however, less likely to develop polyps in the upper part of the colon. Red meat, meanwhile, was not linked to polyp risk.

Despite that latter finding, the overall results are in line with advice to eat red and processed meats sparingly, Robertson and his colleagues write.

Sue      Permalink


Jan 12, 2006

Gamma Knife Surgery Improves Survival

Gamma Knife Surgery Improves Survival
Gamma knife, or radio-surgery is a method of treating brain tumors with focused radiation beams. Until now it was considered a palliative treatment meaning that is was only thought to improve symptoms. Now there is evidence to suggest that many patients can survive for years after undergoing effective gamma knife radio-surgery for cancers that have spread to the brain.

Radio-surgery is shown to be capable of extending survival by 13 months or longer, depending on the tumor type. These conclusions come from a recent research conducted by Dr. Douglas Kondziolka and colleagues from the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pennsylvania. The study included 44 patients who survived more than four years after undergoing radiosurgery to determine clinical and treatment patterns that affect the outcome. These patients who have undergone gamma knife surgery had an average life span of 68 months with some patients living as long as 156 months so far.

Researchers have found those patients who survived more than four years after radio-surgery had higher pre-treatment scores on physical functioning and had fewer metastases, and less cancer in other parts of the body than those patients who died soon after radio-surgery.

Sherin      Permalink


Jan 9, 2006

Acrylamide Does Not Cause Colon Cancer

Acrylamide Does Not Cause Colon Cancer
Remember all that media frenzy about acrylamide in fried snacks last year. The media has given a lot of space for the possible link between acrylamide and cancer. Now there is information from a new research finding is available that suggest that all that noise and fury were probably for nothing.

Acrylamide is present in cooked and especially fried snacks like potato chips, pretzels and popcorn. This new study from Harvard medical center has shown that dietary intake of acrylamide does not appear to be associated with colorectal cancer at least in women.

"There has been considerable discourse about whether exposure to acrylamide in foods could increase the risk of human cancer," Dr. Lorelei A. Mucci, of Harvard Medical School, Boston, and colleagues write in the International Journal of Cancer.

"Acrylamide is classified as a probable human carcinogen, and animal studies have demonstrated an increased incidence of tumors in rats exposed to very high levels."

Mucci and colleagues examined the association between acrylamide in food and the risk of colon and rectal cancers using data from the Swedish Mammography Cohort, which included 61,467 women enrolled between 1987 and 1990. It's the first large, forward-looking study to investigate this relationship.

After reviewing the data The researches fond no association between acrylamide intake and the risk of colorectal cancer. Comparing the highest and the lowest intake of acrylamide, the risk for any form of colorectal cancer varied by no more than 10 percent, Mucci's team reports.

"In light of the null findings of this and other research, an important question is why the epidemiologic data on dietary acrylamide thus far seem to contradict data from animal experiments and risk assessment models," they add.

Although no single study can provide the final answer on the effects of acrylamide, the researchers point out, this and other studies "suggest that acrylamide intake in the amounts taken in through the diet do not increase the risk of colorectal cancer."

Sue      Permalink


Jan 6, 2006

New Screening Combo For Colorectal Cancer

New Screening Combo For Colorectal Cancer
Stool testing for blood in the stool is getting more sophisticated. A new study has shown that use of a simple immunochemical fecal occult blood test (FOBT), in combination with the traditional guaiac FOBT is capable of accurately detecting colorectal cancer and may reduce the need for more complex and less pleasing procedure of invasive colonoscopy.

These findings are published in the recent issue of the journal Lancet Oncology.

While guaiac FOBT, which detects blood in the feces, is inexpensive and relatively easy to do, it's not very accurate and has low clinical sensitivity and specificity, because cancer is not the only cause of blood in feces, the British researchers noted. People who test positive on guaiac FOBT have a follow-up colonoscopy, which is a more expensive procedure and carries some risks, the study authors added.

Researchers propose that people who have weak or moderate positive guaiac FOBT results have a follow-up immunochemical FOBT to identify those who would be less likely to have cancer and not require a colonoscopy.

Beckman Coulter is one amongst several other companies that has introduced improved products called fecal immunochemical tests or FIT. These products are being recognized by the medical world as a more reliable way of detecting cancer and the polyps, which have the chances of developing into cancer.

Sue      Permalink


Jan 4, 2006

Statins Have No Cancer Protective Effect

Statins Have No Cancer Protective Effect
Contrary to the common scientific community belief and findings from some earlier studies, statins, the popular cholesterol lowering drugs may not protect you from developing any type of cancer as per findings from two new studies.

Previous preliminary studies have shown that statins may have a protective effect in various types of cancers including breast cancer, colon cancer and prostate cancer. However a recent meta analysis of 26 studies involving 87,000 patients has concluded that statins do not lower the risk of developing cancer or dying from cancer. The drug had absolutely no impact on cancer as per the article published in Journal of the American Medical Association.

In another parallel study conducted by the American Cancer Society researchers, reviewed data on more than 130,000 patients from the United States and found that statins have no effect on colon cancer. These researchers found no difference in cancer rates between those who used statins and those who did not. Their findings are published in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute's January 4 issue.


This probably would conclude the matter with statins and cancer protection. Statins are the most commonly prescribed drugs in the world. This group includes, Pfizer Inc.'s Lipitor, Merck and Co Inc.'s Zocor, Bristol-Myers Squibb's Pravachol, Merck's Mevacor and Novartis AG's Lescol.


Janet      Permalink


Jan 3, 2006

Crohn's Disease Increases Risk Of Colorectal Cancer

Crohn's Disease Increases Risk Of Colorectal Cancer
Crohn's disease is the inflammation of the digestive tract which affects a half million Americans, aged between 15 to 35 years of age. According to a new report this disease increased the risk of intestinal cancer.

Dr. Tine Jess from Herley University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark reports that the patients with Crohn's disease are at a higher risk of both colorectal and small bowel cancer.

A meta-analysis of the overall risk for colorectal cancer and small bowel cancer in Crohn's disease patients was conducted by Dr. Jess and his colleagues and this was compared with the expected risks in age- and gender- matched background populations.


The authors report that the general risk for colorectal cancer was 1.9 fold higher for Crohn's patients than for patients without Crohn's.


The high risk of colorectal cancer applied only to Crohn's disease
patients with colonic Crohn's disease or iliocolonic Crohn's disease
and not to patients whose ailment was limited to the ileum.


The researchers also note that the risk for small bowel cancer was more than 27 times higher in patients with Crohn's disease than others.

Recently immunosuppressive drugs have been introduced in the treatment of patients with Crohn's disease which is likely to reduce the risk of intestinal cancer by increasing the control of the intestinal inflammation in such patients.

Sue      Permalink


Jan 1, 2006

Older Colon Cancer Patients Benefit From A Caregivers

Older Colon Cancer Patients Benefit From A Caregivers
Colon cancer patients who are 65 and older may benefit from a caregiver's involvement, and caregivers may ultimately have a major impact on patients' disease management, according to a survey of oncologists commissioned by the Alliance for Aging Research.

Ninety percent of oncologists feel that caregivers have a moderate to major impact on the decision-making process. Unfortunately, only about 64 percent of colon cancer patients in this age group have caregivers' support.

"Physicians should encourage patients to enlist a caregiver and involve them in the treatment decision-making process," said Dr. Stuart Lichtman, associate attending physician at the Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center.

More than half of oncologists who agree that colon cancer patients 65 and older have a more difficult time managing their disease than younger patients also agree that these patients are generally less proactive about researching available treatment options. Seventy-seven percent said that such patients experienced better disease outcomes with a caregiver's involvement due to increased communication. Additionally, caregivers play an important role in providing emotional support, participating in doctors' visits and in decisions about disease management options, and providing transportation to appointments.

Sue      Permalink


Dec 31, 2005

Beware of Sharks!

Beware of Sharks!
As caner strikes some person, it not only exhausts the person physically and emotionally but also can also affect the person and family financially. Naturally every one of us wants to get the best price for the drugs in the market. While you can research on the Internet and often get very good deals for many of the cancer medications, you should be very careful with this process. There are sharks out there waiting for the right opportunity.

Go to http://www.cancercure.org/ and you can see a list of cancer medications that you can buy from this site. Also you can buy many medications and alternative therapies that can cure your cancer. They offer you FDA approved treatment of cancer that will keep you cancer free for the rest of your life.

This and a series of other pharmaceutical websites are run by a man once known in South Florida as "Big Pimpin' Pappy" who has now moved into the bogus pharmaceutical business using a Boca Raton post office box.

Arthur Vanmoor was deported to the Netherlands after pleading no contest last year to conspiracy and racketeering charges for allegedly running a lucrative and organized prostitution ring in Broward and southern Palm Beach counties.

A federal judge ordered http://www.cancercure.org/ to be shut down immediately, but it is still operational at the time of posting this blog.

Janet      Permalink


Dec 26, 2005

New Colon Cancer Guidelines From NCCN

New Colon Cancer Guidelines From NCCN
The National Comprehensive Cancer Network (NCCN) is proud to announce several new updates to the NCCN Colon Cancer Guidelines. The changes highlight cutting-edge developments in the treatment of colon cancer and represent the recognized standard for clinical policy in oncology in both the community and the academic practice settings.

The latest version of the NCCN Colon Cancer Guidelines include several major changes to recommended courses of treatment based on recent relevant clinical studies and changing practice patterns. One significant change is the recommendation that all first-line therapy for advanced or metastatic disease should include bevacizumab (Avastin) in the treatment regimen. The panel also added a new regimen, capecitabine (Xeloda) and oxaliplatin (Eloxatin) also known as CAPOX as a treatment option in first-line therapy.

In addition to changing treatment recommendations in advanced or metastatic disease, there are also new options in the adjuvant setting. The panel added new treatment regimens for Stage IIA patients, including capecitabine, 5-FU/leucovorin or 5-FU/leucovorin/oxaliplatin.

Also, a new section entitled "Principles of Pathologic Review" has been added to the NCCN Colon Cancer Guidelines to provide detailed information regarding issues such as adequate lymph node evaluation required for accurate staging and the sentinel lymph node and detection of micrometastasis by immunohistochemistry.

NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology(TM) are developed and updated through a consensus-driven process with explicit review of the scientific evidence by multidisciplinary panels of expert physicians from NCCN member institutions. The most recent version of this and all the guidelines are available for free at www.nccn.org.

Sue      Permalink


Dec 25, 2005

Merry Christmas From Medicineworld.org

Merry Christmas From Medicineworld.org
Medicineworld wishes all our readers merry Christmas.

Oh, jingle bells, jingle bells
Jingle all the way
Oh, what fun it is to ride
In a one horse open sleigh
Jingle bells, jingle bells
Jingle all the way
Oh, what fun it is to ride
In a one horse open sleigh

A day or two ago
I thought I'd take a ride
And soon Miss Fanny Bright
Was seated by my side
The horse was lean and lank
Misfortune seemed his lot
We got into a drifted bank
And then we got upsot

Oh, jingle bells, jingle bells
Jingle all the way
Oh, what fun it is to ride
In a one horse open sleigh
Jingle bells, jingle bells
Jingle all the way
Oh, what fun it is to ride
In a one horse open sleigh yeah

Janet      Permalink


Dec 25, 2005

Do You Read All Of Our Medical Blogs?

Do You Read All Of Our Medical Blogs?
Do you read all of the medical blogs published by medicineworld.org? Many of our bloggers are busy keeping you updated on various medical topics. Medicieworld.org is publishing a wide variety of blogs on different topics.

Breast cancer blog: Breast cancer blog is run by Janet and colleagues. Latest post from this breast cancer blog reads as follows: Location of Breast Cancer Does Matter - Does it really matter which part of the breast you develop cancer? Researchers say yes.
Researchers from Switzerland recently reported that women with early breast cancer in the lower inner quadrant (the lower part of the breast, closer to the center of the body) are twice as likely to die of their cancer as women with cancer diagnosed in other parts of the breast. Researchers speculate this could be due to undetected spread of the cancer to the lymph nodes of the internal mammary chain (lymph nodes near the center of the chest). These lymph nodes are difficult to be evaluated for the presence of cancer.......

Lung cancer blog: Lung cancer blog is run by Scott and colleagues. Latest post from this lung cancer blog reads as follows: Cancer Death Rate Continues to Drop in U.S. - It is comforting to know that the cancer death rates continue to drop and cancer diagnosis rate continue to be stable in the United States. This is true for most of the common types of cancer including breast cancer, lung cancer, colorectal cancer and the prostate cancer. This information is released by the National Cancer Institute.......

Colon cancer blog: Colon cancer blog is run by Sue and colleagues. Latest post from this cancer blog post reads as follows: Cancer Death Rate Continues to Drop in U.S. - It is comforting to know that the cancer death rates continue to drop and cancer diagnosis rate continue to be stable in the United States. This is true for most of the common types of cancer including breast cancer, lung cancer, colorectal cancer and the prostate cancer. This information is released by the National Cancer Institute...............

Prostate cancer blog: Prostate cancer blog is run by Mark and colleagues. Latest post from this prostate cancer blog reads as follows: Cancer Death Rate Continues to Drop in U.S. - It is comforting to know that the cancer death rates continue to drop and cancer diagnosis rate continue to be stable in the United States. This is true for most of the common types of cancer including breast cancer, lung cancer, colorectal cancer and the prostate cancer. This information is released by the National Cancer Institute...............

We have a diabetes watch blog as well and this is run by JoAnn and colleagues. The latest post from this diabetes watch blog reads as follows: Health Canada Issues Warning For Avandia and Avandamet - Health Canada is issuing warnings for two commonly used drugs to treat Type-2 diabetes. The warning states that use of these drugs may lead to new cases or worsening of a vision problem called macular edema.......

Heart watch blog: Heart watch blog is run by Daniel and colleagues. The latest post from this heart watch blog reads as follows: Fish Oil Combats Heart Problem Related To Pollution - You probably can't do much to improve the air pollution around you, but now you can protect yourself from some of the harmful effects of air pollution on the heart. A new research finding suggests that daily supplementation with omega-3 fatty acid (fish oil) prevents a potentially-deadly decline in heart rate variability (HRV) associated with exposure to indoor air pollution, researchers from the US and Canada report......

Cancer blog: I manage the cancer blog with lots of help and support form other bloggers. The latest post from this cancer blog reads as follows: Pancreatic Cancer: Looking Forward To Skin Rash! - Probably you all know that a new drug combination Tarceva and Gemzar has been FDA approved recently for the treatment of pancreatic cancer. Did you know that, if you are developing a bad skin rash while on this treatment it is a good sign! I am not kidding, the study that led to the approval of this combination was presented in the American Society of Clinical Oncology meeting in 2005. This study has shown that the combination of Tarceva and Gemzar works best in patients who had a bad skin rash!......

Scott      Permalink


Dec 23, 2005

Cancer Death Rate Continues to Drop in U.S.

Cancer Death Rate Continues to Drop in U.S.
It is comforting to know that the cancer death rates continue to drop and cancer diagnosis rate continue to be stable in the United States. This is true for most of the common types of cancer including breast cancer, lung cancer, colorectal cancer and the prostate cancer. This information is released by the National Cancer Institute.

The stabilization of the cancer diagnosis rate shows that Americans are taking some steps to help prevent cancer, the agency said, and the use of some screening tests is at high rates in an effort to detect cancers early.

"The overall message of the report remains positive," NCI Director Andrew C. von Eschenbach said in releasing the report. "The evidence that I have seen convinces me that we are poised to make dramatic gains against cancer in the near future."

The rate of new cases of cancer was 488.6 per 100,000 Americans in 2002, close to the rate of 488.1 a year earlier.

At the same time, the death rate for all cancers was 193.6 per 100,000, down from 195.7 a year earlier and continuing a steady downward trend. Death rates for prostate cancer showed, 28.0 per 100,000, down from 28.9, breast cancer death rates were down to 25.4, from 26.0, colorectal cancers were down to, 19.6, from 20.1 and lung death rates were down to 54.8 from 55.2.

Smoking by youths, which had been growing in the 1990s, has been declining since 1997, the report said. Youths are starting to smoke later, with average age for first use of cigarettes at 15.4 in 2003, up from 14.9 a decade earlier. And the percentage of high schoolers who smoked cigarettes fell from 30.5 percent to 21.9 percent in the same period.

Janet      Permalink


Dec 22, 2005

Why Some Colon Cancer Tumors Grow Faster?

Why Some Colon Cancer Tumors Grow Faster?
It's a common experience to see colon cancer tumors in some person staying without much growth for years, while in some others it may grow very fast and spread to different organs of the body in an explosive fashion. Now researchers are offering explanation for this difference in behavior of the colon cancer tumors.

In some people, the body's immune system mounts an effective defense against the tumor and against the tumor's attempt to spread to other sites in the body. In these patients the immune system creates, what is called "effector memory T cells" to fight the growing cancer cells.

"Effector memory T cells have the capacity to recognize and kill tumor cells. These cells, located in the tumor, have a long-lasting anti-tumor activity, persist within the body and destroy distant tumor cells," said one of the study's authors, Jerome Galon, a research scientist at the French National Institute of Health and Medical Research in Paris.


These research findings appear in the latest issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Galon and his colleagues analyzed the immune response to colorectal cancer tumor samples from 959 people. On average, those who were able to mount an effective immune response lived 35 months, compared to 16.3 months for those with no effective immune response.

"Effector memory T cells have a major impact on colorectal cancer evolution. These cells prevent tumor dissemination within the body and distant metastasis, and improve survival of the patients," said Galon. Galon said these T cells kill tumor cells that attempt to migrate from the original tumor.

Sue      Permalink


Dec 21, 2005

Crush Colon Cancer With Vitamin D

Crush Colon Cancer With Vitamin D
Just take a daily dose of the common vitamin D and cut down your risk of developing colon cancer by half. That's the new message from researchers from California. Researchers at the Moores Cancer Center of the University of California at San Diego (UCSD) said their studies showed that taking 1,000 international units, or 25 micrograms, of vitamin D every day would slash down the risk of getting colon cancer by 50 percent.

This preventive link between vitamin D and colon cancer is know for over two decades as per UCSD professor Edward Gorham, but scientists did not know the specific amount of the vitamin needed to have a clear impact.

Their study "establishes the target level of vitamin D that could reduce the incidence of colorectal cancer by half," Gorham said.

"Preventing approximately half of colorectal cancer incidence by a program that would ensure vitamin D adequacy could save an estimated 20 billion dollars per year," he said.

"Annual supplementation of all Americans with 1,000 international units per day of vitamin D would cost about $5 billion."

Such a program could prevent possibly 28,000 deaths each year, according to the study's results.

The study, which has just been published in the Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, was based on a review of 18 scientific papers dealing with vitamin D and colon cancer.

Sue      Permalink


Dec 19, 2005

Eat Chicken To Reduce Colon Cancer Risk

Eat Chicken To Reduce Colon Cancer Risk
A recent study in The American Journal of Gastroenterology revealed that patterns in diet may effect the development of colorectal adenomas, or precancerous polyps of the colon.

In this study, over 1500 patients underwent baseline colonoscopy to remove existing polyps. They were then given a survey about their diet. After a period of one and then four years later, the group underwent follow-up colonoscopies to determine if any polyps had returned. Those who had consumed diets higher in processed meats showed a greater risk of developing recurrent colorectal adenomas. Those with diets high in certain white meats, like chicken, were less prone to this risk.

"Our results are consistent with prior studies that suggest certain dietary factors may be important in the development of colon polyps and cancer," states Douglas Robertson, lead researcher of the study and Chief of the Section of Gastroenterology at the VA Medical Center in White River Junction, Vermont.

Previous studies have explored whether fiber intake effects the growth and development of colorectal adenomas and cancer, however, this study found no significant evidence to suggest an association. The same was determined for dietary intake of fat and red meat.

Sue      Permalink


Dec 18, 2005

Use The New Test To Determine Camptosar Dose

Use The New Test To Determine Camptosar Dose
If you are receiving camptosar or planning for camptosar as a part of your colorectal cancer you can't afford to miss this information. A test to determine the dose of camptosar in the treatment of colorectal cancer is now available. Genzyme Corporation has announced the launch of the Invader® UGT1A1 Molecular Assay for colorectal cancer patients in the North America who are being considered for, or currently taking, the chemotherapy Camptosar (irinotecan). The test was recently cleared by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and was developed by Third Wave Technologies Inc.

The UGT1A1 Molecular Assay identifies patients who may be at increased risk for severe adverse reactions to Camptosar by detecting variations in the UGT1A1 gene that have been associated with that risk. A prospective clinical study indicated that patients with one of these variations have a greater than nine-fold risk of experiencing significant side effects from Camptosar than patients without it. Camptosar labeling was recently updated to include dosing recommendations based on a patient's UGT1A1 status.


"The UGT1A1 Molecular Invader Assay is a significant addition to Genzyme's oncology testing menu. We have initiated an education program aimed at physicians because it is critical that they are aware that this test will help them understand their patients' risk of serious side effects. This will help doctors treat their colorectal cancer patients with the appropriate dose of Camptosar," said Mara Aspinall, president of Genzyme Genetics, a business unit of Genzyme Corporation that focuses on the research and development of high quality, complex testing services.

The UGT1A1 test was 100 percent accurate compared to DNA sequencing, the standard for genotype determination.

Sue      Permalink


Dec 16, 2005

Cure Cancer With Your Personal Computer

Cure Cancer With Your Personal Computer
I was reading this report from ABC and thought that this story is worth mentioning here. The report says that you can contribute towards cancer research by allowing the supercomputer of the researchers to use some of the computing powers of your home pc.

The idea is this: you can download a small program and install it on your computer and then forget about it. The researchers would use that extra computing power on your computer, to expand the capabilities of their super computer.

The report says that, modern computers are incredibly powerful machines whose processing abilities are seldom used to their full abilities. Regardless of how hard you push it, you're probably not using as much of the computer's power as you think.

Is it safe, that's the next question?
With widespread reports of Internet virus attacks, worms, Trojan horses, spyware and identity theft, some might fear that participating in a grid will make them more vulnerable to becoming a virtual victim.

"We are comfortable saying that on any computer you're willing to browse, you should be comfortable putting our client on," said Armentrout of his company's grid software. "We say it's safer than surfing."

Litow said that IBM is also committed to keeping participants safe, and that in the year IBM's World Community Grid has been in existence - a network of humanitarian grid projects - there hasn't been a single problem.

You may read the whole story here

Janet      Permalink


Dec 14, 2005

Dietary Fiber Does Not Reduce Risk Of Colorectal Cancer

Dietary Fiber Does Not Reduce Risk Of Colorectal
In an analysis combining data from 13 studies, high intake of dietary fiber was not associated with reduced risk of colorectal cancer, according to a study in the December 14 issue of JAMA.

Dietary fiber has been hypothesized to reduce the risk of colorectal cancer, according to background information in the article. However, the results of numerous epidemiological studies have been inconsistent. Ecological correlation studies and many case-control studies have found an inverse association between dietary fiber intake and risk of colorectal cancer. But most prospective cohort studies have found no association between dietary fiber intake and risk of colorectal cancer or adenomas (precursors of colorectal cancer), and randomized clinical trials of dietary fiber supplementation have failed to show reductions in the recurrence of colorectal adenomas.

Yikyung Park, Sc.D., of the Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, and colleagues evaluated the association between dietary fiber intake and risk of colorectal cancer by reanalyzing the primary data from 13 prospective cohort studies (Pooling Project of Prospective Studies of Diet and Cancer). The pooled analysis included 725,628 men and women who were followed-up for 6 to 20 years across studies.

During the follow-up, 8,081 colorectal cancer cases were identified. Among the studies, median (midpoint) energy-adjusted dietary fiber intake ranged from 14 to 28 g/d in men and from 13 to 24 g/d in women. The major source of dietary fiber varied across studies with cereals as a major contributor to dietary fiber intake in the European studies, and fruits and vegetables as the main sources in the North American studies.

Dec 11, 2005

Women, Blacks, and Elderly Under treated For Colon Cancer

Women, Blacks, and Elderly Under treated For Colon Cancer
Women, blacks and elderly patients with advanced colon cancer are less likely to receive chemotherapy than other patients despite evidence that the treatment improves survival rates, according to a study published in the latest issue Journal of the American Medical Association, the AP/Philadelphia Inquirer reports.

For the study, researchers from the National Cancer Institute analyzed data from about 86,000 patients at 560 hospitals nationwide and found that the rate of colon cancer patients who received chemotherapy in addition to surgery increased from 39% in 1991 to 64% in 2002.

According to the study, about two-thirds of participants who received chemotherapy in addition to surgery were alive after five years, compared with about 50% of those who only received surgery. Chemotherapy also improved the five-year survival rate among participants by an average of 16%.

In addition, the disparity in chemotherapy rates among black colon cancer patients decreased between 1991 and 2002 until the difference was no longer significant, but the disparity remained for women and elderly patients, according to the study

Sue      Permalink






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Colorectal cancer
Colorectal cancer is a malignant tumor that arises from the inner wall of the large intestine or rectum. Colorectal cancer is the third commonest cancer diagnosed in the United States. Each year over 100,000 people are diagnosed with colorectal cancer in the United States. Most, of these cancers develop from growths in the colon called polyps. Removal of these polyps can prevent colon cancer.

Colon Cancer Blog: From Medicineworld.org

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