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Medicineworld.org: Women Feel Rushed Even With More Time

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Women Feel Rushed Even With More Time

Women Feel Rushed Even With More Time
While more free time sounds like a good thing for everyone, new research suggests it is a better deal for men than it is for women.

A study found that men who have more free time feel less rushed than men with less leisure time. But even when women have more time free from paid work and household tasks, they don't feel less rushed.

The results suggest that women - especially mothers - may feel the pressures of childcare and housework even when they have time for relaxation, said Liana Sayer, co-author of the study and assistant professor of sociology at Ohio State University.

"The meaning of free time for men's and women's lives are quite different," Sayer said. "Particularly for wives and mothers, it appears free time is still combined with other activities or responsibilities."

Women, in effect, pay a "family penalty," she said.

For example, the study found that men who were married and had children didn't feel more rushed in their daily lives than single, childless men.

But the odds of feeling sometimes or always rushed were 2.2 times higher for married women with children than it was for single, childless women.

Sayer conducted the study with Marybeth Mattingly of the University of Maryland. Their results appear in the February 2006 issue of the Journal of Marriage and Family.

The scientists examined time diary data from two national surveys conducted in 1975-76 and 1998-99.

The 1975 data included 708 people from across the country interviewed by the Institute for Social Research at the University of Michigan. The 1998 data included a national sample of 1,151 people surveyed by the Survey Research Center at the University of Maryland.

In both surveys, respondents filled out a diary that showed how they spent a specific 24-hour period. Free time was measured as time not spent at paid work, household chores, child care, or self care such as eating, grooming and sleeping. Participants were also asked how often they felt rushed during a typical day - never, sometimes or always.

The results showed that time pressures increased for women between 1975 and 1998, particularly in comparison to men.

In 1975, women and men had similar amounts of free time, but by 1998 a 30-minute per day gender gap had opened, with women having less leisure time than men.

"Women worked more hours in paid employment in 1998 than they did in 1975," Sayer said. "The amount of time they spend in household labor declined during that period, but not enough to offset the increase in paid work hours."




Did you know?
While more free time sounds like a good thing for everyone, new research suggests it is a better deal for men than it is for women. A study found that men who have more free time feel less rushed than men with less leisure time. But even when women have more time free from paid work and household tasks, they don't feel less rushed.

Medicineworld.org: Women Feel Rushed Even With More Time

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