MedicineWorld.Org
Your gateway to the world of medicine
Home
News
Cancer News
About Us
Cancer
Health Professionals
Patients and public
Contact Us
Disclaimer

Medicineworld.org: Malaria in the Middle East

Back to infectious disease news Blogs list Cancer blog  


Subscribe To Infectious Disease News RSS Feed  RSS content feed What is RSS feed?

Malaria in the Middle East

Malaria in the Middle East
Malaria is not commonly thought of as a major disease in the Middle East, but a study from Yemen in this week's BMJ reveals worryingly high levels of severe malaria in children.

In fact, the figures show that as a number of as 4 out of 10 children attending hospital with severe illness could be affected during the peak season. This is comparable to a number of areas of Africa.

Scientists identified over 2,000 children aged 6 months to 10 years who were admitted to two public hospitals with suspected severe malaria. Malaria was confirmed in 1,332 children, 808 of whom had severe malaria.

The proportion of admissions varied as per the season, from 1% between July and September to 40% in February and March. Twenty six children died in hospital. Most deaths were in children with a neurological presentation, and more girls died than boys.

Severe malaria puts a high burden on health services in Yemen, say the authors. Malaria control should be a priority and lesson should be learnt from other areas of highly seasonal malaria.


Posted by: Mark    Source




Did you know?
Malaria is not commonly thought of as a major disease in the Middle East, but a study from Yemen in this week's BMJ reveals worryingly high levels of severe malaria in children. In fact, the figures show that as a number of as 4 out of 10 children attending hospital with severe illness could be affected during the peak season. This is comparable to a number of areas of Africa.

Medicineworld.org: Malaria in the Middle East

SARS Main| SARS Abroad| SARS and Goverment| SARS Information in different languages| Media about SARS| Physicians resources for SARS| Reference information for SARS| Updates on SARS|

Copyright statement
The contents of this web page are protected. Legal action may follow for reproduction of materials without permission.