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Medicineworld.org: Ten minutes of talking has a mental payoff

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Ten minutes of talking has a mental payoff




Spending just 10 minutes talking to another person can help improve your memory and your performance on tests, as per a University of Michigan study would be reported in the February 2008 issue of the Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin.

"In our study, socializing was just as effective as more traditional kinds of mental exercise in boosting memory and intellectual performance," said Oscar Ybarra, a psychology expert at the U-M Institute for Social Research (ISR) and a lead author of the study with ISR psychology expert Eugene Burnstein and psychology expert Piotr Winkielman from the University of California, San Diego.

In the article, Ybarra, Burnstein and his colleagues report on findings from two types of studies they conducted on the relationship between social interactions and mental functioning.



Ten minutes of talking has a mental payoff

Their research was funded in part by a grant from the National Science Foundation.

In one study, they examined ISR survey data to see whether there was a relationship between mental functioning and specific measures of social interaction. The survey data included information on a national, stratified area probability sample of 3,610 people between the ages of 24 and 96. Their mental function was assessed through the mini-mental exam, a widely used test that measures knowledge of personal information and current events and that also includes a simple test of working memory.

Participants' level of social interactions was assessed by asking how often each week they talked on the phone with friends, neighbors and relatives, and how often they got together.

After controlling for a wide range of demographic variables, including age, education, race/ethnicity, gender, marital status and income, as well as for physical health and depression, the scientists looked at the correlation between frequency of social contact and level of mental function on the mini-mental exam.

The higher the level of participants' social interaction, scientists found, the better their cognitive functioning. This relationship was reliable for all age groups, from the youngest through the oldest.

In a second experiment, the scientists conducted a laboratory test to assess how social interactions and intellectual exercises affected memory and mental performance. Participants were 76 college students, ages 18 to 21. Each student was assigned to one of three groups. Those in the social interaction group engaged in a discussion of a social issue for 10 minutes before taking the tests. Those in the intellectual activities group completed three tasks before taking the tests. These tasks included a reading comprehension exercise and a crossword puzzle. Participants in a control group watched a 10-minute clip of "Seinfeld".

Then all participants completed two different tests of intellectual performance that measured their mental processing speed and working memory.

"We observed that short-term social interaction lasting for just 10 minutes boosted participants' intellectual performance as much as engaging in so-called 'intellectual' activities for the same amount of time," Ybarra said.

"To our knowledge, this experiment represents the only causal evidence showing that social interaction directly affects memory and mental performance in a positive way".

As per Ybarra, the findings suggest that visiting with a friend or neighbor may be just as helpful in staying sharp as doing a daily crossword puzzle.

The findings also suggest that social isolation may have a negative effect on intellectual abilities as well as emotional well-being. And for a society characterized by increasing levels of social isolation-a trend sociologist Robert Putnam calls "Bowling Alone"-the effects could be far-reaching.


Posted by: JoAnn    Source




Did you know?
Spending just 10 minutes talking to another person can help improve your memory and your performance on tests, as per a University of Michigan study would be reported in the February 2008 issue of the Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin. "In our study, socializing was just as effective as more traditional kinds of mental exercise in boosting memory and intellectual performance," said Oscar Ybarra, a psychology expert at the U-M Institute for Social Research (ISR) and a lead author of the study with ISR psychology expert Eugene Burnstein and psychology expert Piotr Winkielman from the University of California, San Diego.

Medicineworld.org: Ten minutes of talking has a mental payoff

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