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Medicineworld.org: Welders at risk for loss of sense of smell

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Welders at risk for loss of sense of smell




PHILADELPHIA Scientists at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine have observed that professional welders who work in enclosed spaces with poor ventilation may be at risk for loss of sense of smell. The study appears in Neurology.



Welders at risk for loss of sense of smell

This is the first study to clearly demonstrate that welders who work in confined spaces without adequate respiratory protection are at risk for damaging their sense of smell, says Richard Doty, PhD, Director, Smell & Taste Center, Professor, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, and senior study author. Eventhough underappreciated, loss of smell function significantly alters quality of life. This important sense not only determines the flavors of foods and beverages, but serves as an early warning system for the detection of fire, dangerous fumes, leaking gas, spoiled foods, and polluted environments.

Using the University of Pennsylvania Smell Identification Test (UPSIT) a self-administered standardized test incorporating 40 scratch-and-sniff odors with multiple choice options to identify the odor the scientists quantitatively reviewed the olfactory function of 43 professional welders who worked in confined spaces on the San Francisco/Oakland Bay Bridge, and compared their test scores with those of matched normal controls.

Dr. Doty and his colleagues observed that the mean UPSIT scores of the welders were, on average, seven points lower than those of their matched controls (29.62 and 36.90). Thirty eight (88%) performed more poorly than their controls, eventhough only 3 (7%) had a total loss of their sense of smell. The percentages of those with mild, moderate, or severe loss of the sense of smell were 30.2, 18.6, and 16.3. The scientists report that interestingly, of the 42 subjects who provided information regarding their sense of smell before being tested, more than half were unaware of a problem.

Blood tests were administered to test for blood levels of chemicals found in welding fumes. The blood tests revealed that 40.5% of the welders had abnormally elevated levels of manganese (Mn). Eventhough this suggests that the welders were exposed mainly to Mn, it is not entirely clear whether Mn is the basis of their olfactory problems. In fact, the welders with the highest Mn blood levels exhibited better olfactory function than those with the lowest Mn blood levels.

The welders also underwent a neuropsychological test battery. Dr. Doty notes, however, that, The results of this study suggest that exposure to the fumes of welding can alter the ability to smell, and that changes in this important sensory system are not correlated with alterations in cognitive function, which also can be induced by toxins in welding fumes.

The scientists conclude that the basis of the smell loss among the welders is not entirely clear. They suggest that eventhough the research shows that the welders had smell dysfunction in relation to the matched controls, additional groups, such as ones consisting of non-welder industrial workers, might be of value in better defining the causality.


Posted by: Janet    Source




Did you know?
PHILADELPHIA Scientists at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine have observed that professional welders who work in enclosed spaces with poor ventilation may be at risk for loss of sense of smell. The study appears in Neurology. This is the first study to clearly demonstrate that welders who work in confined spaces without adequate respiratory protection are at risk for damaging their sense of smell, says Richard Doty, PhD, Director, Smell and Taste Center, Professor, Department of Otorhinolaryngology, and senior study author. Eventhough underappreciated, loss of smell function significantly alters quality of life. This important sense not only determines the flavors of foods and beverages, but serves as an early warning system for the detection of fire, dangerous fumes, leaking gas, spoiled foods, and polluted environments.

Medicineworld.org: Welders at risk for loss of sense of smell

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