MedicineWorld.Org
Your gateway to the world of medicine
Home
News
Cancer News
About Us
Cancer
Health Professionals
Patients and public
Contact Us
Disclaimer

Medicineworld.org: How Genes Affect Antipsychotic Drug Response?

Back to psychology news Blogs list Cancer blog  


Subscribe To Psychology News RSS Feed  RSS content feed What is RSS feed?

How Genes Affect Antipsychotic Drug Response?

How Genes Affect Antipsychotic Drug Response?
Scientists at the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Pharmacy are attempting to discover how genes determine how well an antipsychotic medicine works in adults and children and the side effects it will cause.

Risperidone, a popular "atypical" antipsychotic medication, is used to treat mental illnesses such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

Jeffrey Bishop, assistant professor of pharmacy practice, is examining the effects of one gene, catechol-o-methyltransferase, on brain activity, cognition and symptom response to the drug.

The study is being done in adults who are experiencing their first episode of schizophrenia who are treated with risperidone for six weeks as part of UIC's First Episode Program.

"Allowing patients with schizophrenia an increased chance at medicine response literally could change their lives," Bishop said.

"While we know a great deal about the pharmacology of antipsychotics like risperidone, there is still much to learn about their influence on cognition and brain function, as well as how genetics affect overall medicine response," he said.

Bishop says the project will serve as a first step toward a comprehensive pharmacogenetic analysis of metabolic pathways affecting response to the drug. He was presented with an award for new researchers from the American College of Clinical Pharmacy for the project.

The UIC Center for Cognitive Medicine's First Episode Program, directed by Dr. John Sweeney, has been studying patients with first-episode schizophrenia for the past five years.

Bishop is also beginning a second project to study how risperidone may elevate prolactin levels and cause weight gain in children ages 8-18 who suffer from pediatric bipolar disorder. An increase in prolactin (a pituitary hormone that may affect bone development) or weight gain occurs in some but not all of these young patients.

"We are trying to determine if some kids are at a greater risk than others for these problems by analyzing genetic markers," Bishop said.

Bishop said if children are to receive long-term drug treatment, clinicians need to make sure they are appropriately monitored and treated as safely as possible.

"Understanding risperidone pharmacogenetics and whether some individuals are at a higher risk for side effects is an important step in this process," he said.

Risperidone is widely prescribed to treat bipolar disorder in children, accounting for half of all atypical antipsychotic prescriptions in pediatric psychiatry. Adverse drug effects, such as weight gain and the possibility of prolactin elevation, are often dose-limiting and affect medicine compliance.


Posted by: JoAnn    Source




Did you know?
Scientists at the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Pharmacy are attempting to discover how genes determine how well an antipsychotic medicine works in adults and children and the side effects it will cause. Risperidone, a popular "atypical" antipsychotic medication, is used to treat mental illnesses such as schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

Medicineworld.org: How Genes Affect Antipsychotic Drug Response?

Acute bacterial meningitis| Alzheimer's disease| Carpal tunnel syndrome| Cerebral aneurysms| Cerebral palsy| Chronic fatigue syndrome| Cluster headache| Dementia| Epilepsy seizure disorders| Febrile seizures| Guillain barre syndrome| Head injury| Hydrocephalus| Neurology| Insomnia| Low backache| Mental retardation| Migraine headaches| Multiple sclerosis| Myasthenia gravis| Neurological manifestations of aids| Parkinsonism parkinson's disease| Personality disorders| Sleep disorders insomnia| Syncope| Trigeminal neuralgia| Vertigo|

Copyright statement
The contents of this web page are protected. Legal action may follow for reproduction of materials without permission.