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Medicineworld.org: Encouraged by drop in colorectal cancer deaths

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Encouraged by drop in colorectal cancer deaths




The American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) heralds the recent news of a decline in U.S. cancer deaths and incidence rates, with colorectal cancer among the top three cancers with significant declines. ASGE, representing the specialists in colorectal cancer screening, is excited by the report showing that colorectal cancer deaths among men and women dropped 4.3 percent per year between 2002 and 2005. The incidence rate for colorectal cancer (the rate at which new cancers are diagnosed) dropped 2.8 percent per year among men and dropped 2.2 percent per year among women between 1998 and 2005.



Encouraged by drop in colorectal cancer deaths
Colonoscopy

The study, issued annually since 1998 by the American Cancer Society, the National Cancer Institute, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries, showed for the first time a simultaneous decline in both cancer death rates and incidence rates in men and women. Incidence rates for all cancers combined (15 most usually diagnosed) decreased 0.8 percent per year from 1999 through 2005 for both sexes combined; rates decreased 1.8 percent per year from 2001 through 2005 for men and 0.6 percent per year from 1998 through 2005 for women. The decline in both incidence and death rates for all cancers combined is due in large part to declines in the three most common cancers among men (lung, colon/rectum, and prostate) and the two most common cancers among women (breast and colon/rectum), combined with a leveling off of lung cancer death rates among women.

The concurrent declines in colorectal cancer mortality and incidence are likely linked to preventing colorectal cancer through screening and removal of premalignant polyps, improving cancer outcomes by earlier stage diagnosis, reducing exposure to risk factors, and improving cancer therapy.

"This report demonstrates the importance of colorectal cancer screening beginning at age 50," said John L. Petrini, MD, FASGE, president of the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy. "Individuals with other risk factors, including a family history of colon cancer or polyps, and African Americans, may need screening at an earlier age. This disease is largely preventable and curable when diagnosed in its early stages. While we are encouraged by this excellent news, far too few people are getting screened. ASGE recommends colonoscopy screening beginning at age 50 and repeating every 10 years after a normal exam. Colonoscopy plays a very important role in colorectal cancer screening and prevention because it is the only method that allows for the detection and removal of premalignant polyps during the same exam and before the polyps turn into cancer".

Colorectal cancer kills more than 50,000 people each year. A number of of those deaths could be prevented with earlier detection. The five-year relative survival rate for people whose colorectal cancer is treated in an early stage is greater than 90 percent. Unfortunately, only 39 percent of colorectal cancers are found at that early stage. Once the cancer has spread to nearby organs or lymph nodes, the five-year relative survival rate decreases dramatically.


Posted by: Sue    Source




Did you know?
The American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE) heralds the recent news of a decline in U.S. cancer deaths and incidence rates, with colorectal cancer among the top three cancers with significant declines. ASGE, representing the specialists in colorectal cancer screening, is excited by the report showing that colorectal cancer deaths among men and women dropped 4.3 percent per year between 2002 and 2005. The incidence rate for colorectal cancer (the rate at which new cancers are diagnosed) dropped 2.8 percent per year among men and dropped 2.2 percent per year among women between 1998 and 2005.

Medicineworld.org: Encouraged by drop in colorectal cancer deaths

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