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From Medicineworld.org: Boyfriend Unaware of Deadly Peanut Allergy

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Boyfriend Unaware of Deadly Peanut Allergy



Update

Christina Desforges did not die of peanut allergry

Christina Desforges did not die of peanut allergry from kissing her boyfriend following his snack of peanut butter, a coroner has confirmed.

Michel Miron says the sudden death of fifteen-year-old Christina Desforges in November 2005 was not caused by a peanut butter sandwich.

The tragedy made headlines around the world.

Miron would not reveal the official cause of the teenager's death because he said he hadn't yet submitted his final report and is still waiting on some test results.

But Miron said he wanted to speak out before the case was mentioned in a forthcoming initiative by the Canadian Association of Food Allergies.

"The Canadian Association of Food Allergies intended to use the Desforges case to launch an education campaign," he told Saguenay's Le Quotidien newspaper.

Read more....

Previous report
Thinking she was having an asthma attack, Christina Desforges burst into a friend's room and woke him in a desperate search for medicine.

Friends called an ambulance as her breathing grew labored, but Desforges collapsed a moment after she stepped outside. She died four days later.

It quickly became clear the 15-year-old girl succumbed to a peanut allergy - not from nuts she ate, but a peanut-butter sandwich her boyfriend had consumed before kissing her that day. A friend of the couple said in a television interview that Desforges' boyfriend and other companions had no idea she was allergic to peanuts. An allergist said Wednesday that the teenager's friends and relatives should have been warned about her condition.

"Some people have an extremely low threshold," said Dr. Rhoda Kagan, an allergist at Montreal Children's Hospital. "This varies greatly from person to person and is highly unpredictable." She called Desforges' case "very rare and worrisome."

One friend, Michael St. Gelais, said he was devastated. "I felt guilty at first because if I had realized earlier she was [allergic], we could probably have saved her," he said in an interview with Canadian Broadcasting Corp. "However, we did as much as we could and I don't think there was more we could have done."

Desforges, who lived about 155 miles north of Quebec City, was almost immediately given a shot of adrenaline, a standard tool for treating anaphylactic shock brought on by an allergy to peanuts. But she died Nov. 23 in a Quebec hospital.

A friend of the couple said in a television interview that Desforges' boyfriend and other companions had no idea she was allergic to peanuts. An allergist said Wednesday that the teenager's friends and relatives should have been warned about her condition.

"Some people have an extremely low threshold," said Dr. Rhoda Kagan, an allergist at Montreal Children's Hospital. "This varies greatly from person to person and is highly unpredictable.".

She called Desforges's case "very rare and worrisome.".

One friend, Michael St. Gelais, said he was devastated by the case.

"I felt guilty at first because if I had realized earlier she was (allergic), we could probably have saved her," he said in an interview with Canadian Broadcasting Corp. "However, we did as much as we could and I don't think there was more we could have done.".

Desforges, who lived in Saguenay, about 155 miles north of Quebec City, was almost immediately given a shot of adrenaline, a standard tool for treating anaphylactic shock brought on by an allergy to peanuts. But she died Nov. 23 at a Quebec hospital.

Symptoms of peanut allergies can include hives, plunging blood pressure and swelling of the face and throat, which can block breathing."There are several images stuck in my mind," St. Gelais said. "We went upstairs because she really was having more difficulty breathing. The minute we went outside, she collapsed.".

A memorial was held Saturday and an autopsy was being performed Wednesday. About 1.5 million Americans are severely allergic to even the smallest trace of peanuts, and peanut allergies account for 50 to 100 deaths in the United States each year. Peanut allergies have been rising in recent decades. The reason remains unclear, but one study found that baby creams or lotions with peanut oil may cause children to develop allergies later in life.


Did you know?
Thinking she was having an asthma attack, Christina Desforges burst into a friend's room and woke him in a desperate search for medicine.Friends called an ambulance as her breathing grew labored, but Desforges collapsed a moment after she stepped outside. She died four days later.

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