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From Medicineworld.org: Intraocular Lens Implant Reduces Need For Reading Glasses

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Intraocular Lens Implant Reduces Need For Reading Glasses


Intraocular Lens Implant Reduces Need For Reading Glasses
Ophthalmologists at Mayo Clinic are implanting a new intraocular lens (IOL) during cataract surgery that promises to reduce or eliminate the need for reading glasses. Standard IOL implants are monofocal. They correct for distance vision but not close-up vision. For activities like reading or working on a computer, patients who've had cataracts removed commonly require reading glasses. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the ReSTOR lens in March. In the clinical trial to gain FDA approval, 80 percent of patients who had the lens implanted reported they no longer needed glasses for any activity.

"To me the greatest thing this lens offers is freedom," says Mayo Clinic ophthalmologist Dr. Akbar Hasan. "You can focus at different depths. You can go into a grocery store, look down the lane and then pick up a can of soup and read the ingredients. You don't have to reach for your glasses." Dr. Hasan is quick to point out that the new lens doesn't offer better quality vision than standard implants, but rather, less dependence on reading glasses.

A cataract is a clouding of the normally clear lens of the eye. It can occur in one or both eyes and generally occurs as part of the normal aging process. In fact, about 70 percent of all Americans over 75 have a significant degree of visual impairment due to cataracts. Cataract surgery, in which the clouded lens is removed and replaced with an artificial one, is one of the most usually performed operations, and IOL implants have been used for over 30 years. "It's a 15-minute operation," Hasan says. "Recovery is quick. People are back on their feet the same day. Commonly their vision stabilizes within a few days."

Sandra Jones, an accountant at a realty office, was both nearsighted and farsighted. Today she wears neither glasses nor contact lens, though she had relied on them since she was a child. Weeks ago, Hasan placed a ReSTOR IOL in both her eyes. "It far exceeded my expectations," Jones says. "I never thought it would be this good. I can read the phone book without glasses, and that's about as small as it gets."

Eventhough ophthalmologists can correct a certain amount of astigmatism during the procedure, patients with a high degree of this imperfection in the curvature of the eye may still need glasses. The multifocal lens has rings of focus within it. These rings may cause some people to see halos at night while looking at traffic lights or headlights. Lastly, the new multifocal lens is not covered by Medicare or most insurance companies and is costlier than prior intraocular lenses.


Source: Mayo clinic


Did you know?
Ophthalmologists at Mayo Clinic are implanting a new intraocular lens (IOL) during cataract surgery that promises to reduce or eliminate the need for reading glasses. Standard IOL implants are monofocal. They correct for distance vision but not close-up vision. For activities like reading or working on a computer, patients who've had cataracts removed commonly require reading glasses. The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved the ReSTOR lens in March. In the clinical trial to gain FDA approval, 80 percent of patients who had the lens implanted reported they no longer needed glasses for any activity.

Medicineworld.org: Intraocular Lens Implant Reduces Need For Reading Glasses

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