MedicineWorld.Org
Your gateway to the world of medicine
Home
News
Cancer News
About Us
Cancer
Health Professionals
Patients and public
Contact Us
Disclaimer

Medicineworld.org: Sunitinib Useful In Gleevec Resistance

Back to cancer news blog Blogs list Cancer blog  


Subscribe To Cancer News Blog RSS Feed  RSS content feed What is RSS feed?

Sunitinib Useful In Gleevec Resistance

Sunitinib Useful In Gleevec Resistance George Demetri, MD
At this week's American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) 2006 Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium, scientists from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston will report on a Phase III clinical trial in which the targeted drug sunitinib (originally called SU11248 and now known as Sutent-) was given to control gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) in patients whose tumors had become resistant to the frontline drug imatinib (Gleevec-).

In addition to confirming the safety and efficacy of sunitinib, the findings illustrate that therapies targeting several signaling pathways inside cancer cells may be an effective therapy approach that may also be applicable to other difficult-to-treat cancers, including kidney cancer.

"Sunitinib is the first molecularly-targeted treatment proven to work against a cancer after another targeted treatment has failed," said the study's principal investigator, George Demetri, MD, director of the Center for Sarcoma and Bone Oncology at Dana-Farber. "These findings are highly significant because they show sunitinib can control tumors and improve survival rates of patients with this condition. Eventhough GIST is relatively uncommon, our understanding of it at the molecular level - down to specific mutations in DNA - has made this disease a proving ground for new therapies that could be useful for treating other cancers."

GIST, a type of sarcoma (or cancer of the body's connective tissue), is a rare tumor that arises in organs of the digestive tract. Eventhough Gleevec is highly effective in the initial therapy of GIST, more than half of patients develop resistance to the drug after about two years. Sunitinib, a capsule taken orally once a day, blocks the action of several "kinase" enzymes that send signals that enable cancer cells to grow. These enzymes, which serve as on-off signals for cell functions, play a crucial role in the uncontrolled growth of tumors and of blood vessels that feed them.

In the study, the research team led by Demetri compared overall survival and duration of tumor control in two groups of Gleevec-resistant GIST patients: a 207-member group who received sunitinib, and a 105-member group who received a placebo, or inert pill. (A placebo was used because there is no standard treatment known to be effective after Gleevec fails in GIST.).



Source: Dana-Farber Cancer Institute




Did you know?
At this week's American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) 2006 Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium, scientists from Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston will report on a Phase III clinical trial in which the targeted drug sunitinib (originally called SU11248 and now known as Sutent-) was given to control gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GIST) in patients whose tumors had become resistant to the frontline drug imatinib (Gleevec-).

Medicineworld.org: Sunitinib Useful In Gleevec Resistance

BREAST CANCER MAIN| Home| Breast cancer news| Common terms| Breast cancer symptoms| Mammogram and breast cancer screening| Treatment by stage| Surgical treatment| Chemotherapy| Chemo drugs| Doxorubicin| Cyclophosphamide| Methotrexate| Hormonal therapy| Radiation therapy| Monoclonal therapy| High dose chemotherapy| Recurrent breast cancer| Bisphosphonates| Pregnancy and breast cancer| Risk factors| Risk details| My risk| Comprehensive| Breast cancer statistics| African Americans| Ashkenazi| Asians| Hispanic| Men| Native Americans| Older women| Younger women| Pregnant women| BRCA|

Copyright statement
The contents of this web page are protected. Legal action may follow for reproduction of materials without permission.