MedicineWorld.Org
Your gateway to the world of medicine
Home
News
Cancer News
About Us
Cancer
Health Professionals
Patients and public
Contact Us
Disclaimer

Medicineworld.org: Obesity and risk of stroke

Back to health Blogs list Cancer blog  


Subscribe To Health RSS Feed  RSS content feed What is RSS feed?

Obesity and risk of stroke




Middle-aged women's waists aren't the only thing that increased in the last decade. So did their chance of stroke. In a new study reported at the American Stroke Association's International Stroke Conference 2008, rising obesity rates have been associated with more strokes among women aged 35 to 54.

A prior analysis of stroke prevalence rates in the United States from 1999 to 2004 revealed that women in their midlife years were more than twice as likely as men of similar age to report having had a stroke, said Amytis Towfighi, M.D., an assistant professor in the Neurology Department at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, Calif.



Obesity and risk of stroke

To determine if this was a new phenomenon and to explore the potential contributions of vascular risk factors to stroke prevalence rates, scientists analyzed data from the National Health and Nutrition Surveys 1988-1994 (NHANES III) and 1999-2004. Scientists observed that while 1.79 percent of women ages 35 to 54 who participated in NHANES reported having stroke, only 0.63 percent of women the same ages who participated in the earlier survey (NHANES III), reported stroke.

The analysis compared medical history variables (including smoking, diabetes mellitus, heart attack, high blood pressure), medicine usage, and clinical markers among women in NHANES III and 1999-2004. Clinical markers reviewed included waist circumference, body mass index (BMI), total cholesterol, low density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL), also known as bad cholesterol), and blood pressure.

"We did not find significant differences in presence of conventional cardiovascular risk factors, such as blood pressure, total cholesterol, LDL, smoking, heart disease, hypertension or diabetes, when we compared the two groups," said Towfighi, lead author of the study. Instead, women in the more recent survey were more likely to be using medications to control blood pressure and cholesterol. In fact, 14.8 percent of women in NHANES 1999-2004 reported using medications to lower blood pressure, in comparison to 8.9 percent in the earlier survey. Nearly 4 percent of women in NHANES 1999-2004 used medications to lower cholesterol, versus 1.4 percent in NHANES III.

"Women in NHANES 1999-2004 were significantly more obese than women a decade prior, with an average BMI of 28.67 kg/m2 versus 27.11 kg/m2 the decade prior," Towfighi said. BMI of 25.0 to 30.0 is considered overweight, while BMI of 30.1 or more is considered obese.

"In addition, women in NHANES 1999-2004 had an average waist circumference of nearly 4 centimeters more than women in the earlier study," Towfighi said. Women in NHANES 1999-2004 also had higher average glycated hemoglobin (an indicator of poor blood sugar control).

The scientists concluded that eventhough key traditional risk factors, such as high blood pressure, may not be higher today than in the '90s, obesity and blood sugar markers are on the increase. "Abdominal obesity is a known predictor of stroke in women and may be a key factor in the midlife stroke surge in women," Towfighi said. "This study highlights the need to intensify efforts in curbing the obesity epidemic in the United States".


Posted by: Sue    Source




Did you know?
Middle-aged women's waists aren't the only thing that increased in the last decade. So did their chance of stroke. In a new study reported at the American Stroke Association's International Stroke Conference 2008, rising obesity rates have been associated with more strokes among women aged 35 to 54.

Medicineworld.org: Obesity and risk of stroke

Acute bacterial meningitis| Alzheimer's disease| Carpal tunnel syndrome| Cerebral aneurysms| Cerebral palsy| Chronic fatigue syndrome| Cluster headache| Dementia| Epilepsy seizure disorders| Febrile seizures| Guillain barre syndrome| Head injury| Hydrocephalus| Neurology| Insomnia| Low backache| Mental retardation| Migraine headaches| Multiple sclerosis| Myasthenia gravis| Neurological manifestations of aids| Parkinsonism parkinson's disease| Personality disorders| Sleep disorders insomnia| Syncope| Trigeminal neuralgia| Vertigo|

Copyright statement
The contents of this web page are protected. Legal action may follow for reproduction of materials without permission.