MedicineWorld.Org
Your gateway to the world of medicine
Home
News
Cancer News
About Us
Cancer
Health Professionals
Patients and public
Contact Us
Disclaimer

Medicineworld.org: Fighting Weight Gain a Different Way

Back to weightwatch Blogs list Cancer blog  


Subscribe To Weightwatch RSS Feed  RSS content feed What is RSS feed?

Fighting Weight Gain A Different Way

Fighting Weight Gain a Different Way Volunteers in the Every Size approach were asked to find an enjoyable, appropriate form of physical activity, such as walking. The focus was on improving health, not losing weight.
Education and coaching centered on health-rather than on weight loss-may help chronic dieters improve their blood pressure, cholesterol and other health indicators.

That's as per a research studydocumented earlier in the Journal of the American Dietetic Association and newly summarized in an obesity-focused issue of Agricultural Research magazine. The magazine is published by the Agricultural Research Service (ARS), the U.S. Department of Agriculture's chief research agency.

ARS chemist Nancy Keim and physiologist Marta Van Loan, both with ARS' Western Human Nutrition Research Center in Davis, Calif., collaborated with University of California-Davis scientists for the study.

Seventy-eight obese women, aged 30 to 45, who volunteered for the investigation were assigned to either a health-centered team or a weight-loss-focused team. The teams met for specialized, 90-minute educational sessions weekly for the first six months of the year-long study, then met for six once-a-month sessions.

Both groups were instructed in nutrition basics. But women on the weight-loss track were taught how to monitor their weight and control their eating, while the other volunteers focused on how to build self-esteem and to recognize and follow the body's natural, internal cues to hunger and fullness.

A total of 38 women-19 from each team-participated in a panel of follow-up exams two years after the study's start. The health-centered volunteers had kept their weight stable. In contrast, the weight-loss volunteers lost weight by the sixth month of the study, but had regained it by the two-year checkpoint.

At the start and end of the study, all volunteers' total cholesterol and systolic blood pressure were in the normal range. However, the health-centered women lowered their total cholesterol and systolic blood pressure, and they were able to maintain those reductions. The weight-loss women didn't lower their total cholesterol at any point in the investigation. In addition, they weren't able to maintain the healthful decrease in systolic blood pressure that they'd achieved just after the six-month weight-loss phase.




Did you know?
Education and coaching centered on health-rather than on weight loss-may help chronic dieters improve their blood pressure, cholesterol and other health indicators. That's as per a research studydocumented earlier in the Journal of the American Dietetic Association and newly summarized in an obesity-focused issue of Agricultural Research magazine. The magazine is published by the Agricultural Research Service (ARS), the U.S. Department of Agriculture's chief research agency.

Medicineworld.org: Fighting Weight Gain a Different Way

Asthma| Hypertension| Medicine Main| Diab french| Diabetes drug info| DruginfoFrench| Type2 diabetes| Create a dust free bedroom| Allergy statistics| Cancer terms| History of cancer| Imaging techniques| Cancer Main| Bladder cancer news| Cervix cancer news| Colon cancer news| Esophageal cancer news| Gastric cancer news| Health news| Lung cancer news| Breast cancer news| Ovarian cancer news| Cancer news|

Copyright statement
The contents of this web page are protected. Legal action may follow for reproduction of materials without permission.