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Medicineworld.org: How To Live With Diabetes

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How To Live With Diabetes

How To Live With Diabetes
People with type-2 diabetes can learn life skills to manage their disease during a six-class workshop organized by the Patient Education Research Center at the Stanford University School of Medicine. Participants will be surveyed as part of a study to assess the effectiveness of the new course.

Without careful management, diabetes can lead to other disorders, such as cardiac complications, hypertension, strokes and kidney failure. Patients frequently don't get enough help from their primary health-care providers. "Once you have the disease, you have it for the rest of your life, and you have to manage it or it will lead to complications," said project coordinator Frank Villa, MPH. "You have to change the way you eat, increase your physical activity, watch your sugar levels and manage your medications".

The diabetes class is the latest in a series of self-management classes run by the center. For 20 years, the center has helped people manage chronic conditions such as arthritis and HIV by teaching self-help techniques. "The diabetes workshops do more than just provide information," said Villa. "People learn skills and techniques that are easy to apply to their day-to-day lives".

The first session of the course is tentatively scheduled for later this month at 1000 Welch Road, Suite 204, in Palo Alto, though the exact date has yet to be determined. The course will be repeated throughout the year in Palo Alto and at other Bay Area locations. During the six weekly, two-and-a-half hour workshops, two lay facilitators, also diabetic, will provide more information about managing the disease including healthful eating habits, ways to incorporate exercise into their lives and coping with medications and the health-care system. The program is intended to complement any instructions from the patients' physicians.

Participants will be randomly assigned to one of two groups; the first will begin the workshops immediately, while the second will wait six months before starting the classes. Both groups must fill out surveys at the beginning, and then six and 12 months after the classes end. They will be tested for blood pressure, blood glucose and cholesterol levels and body mass indices, free of charge. The study is funded through a grant from the California Health Care Foundation.

In addition to gaining practical advice and helping to research the program's effectiveness, people frequently establish friendships that last beyond the workshops, Villa said. "You have highs and lows when managing diabetes, but you always have someone there to give support and motivate you," he said.

All participants will receive a free compact disc on relaxation techniques and the 2006 edition of the book Living a Healthy Life with Long-Term Conditions, edited by Kate Lorig, RN, DrPH, principal investigator of the diabetes self-management study and director of the Patient Education Center.

To be eligible, participants must be over age 18 and have a diagnosis of type-2 diabetes. People at all stages of the disease may enroll. The center is also seeking volunteer workshop leaders and other Bay Area sites to host sessions. Call (800) 366-2624 to sign up, or visit http://patienteducation.stanford.edu/programs.



Posted by: JoAnn    Source




Did you know?
People with type-2 diabetes can learn life skills to manage their disease during a six-class workshop organized by the Patient Education Research Center at the Stanford University School of Medicine. Participants will be surveyed as part of a study to assess the effectiveness of the new course.

Medicineworld.org: How To Live With Diabetes

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