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Reducing Eye Strain Of Computer Use

Reducing Eye Strain Of Computer Use
A recent study shows that nearly 54 million children work at a computer each day either at home or in school. Unfortnately, of these 54 million, those who spend more than two hours each day in front of a computer screen are more likely experience headaches, loss of focus, burning/tired eyes, double/blurred vision, and/or neck/shoulder pain.

Children are not the only ones who suffer from painful vision problems. New information reveals that the majority of people who work at a computer experience some eye or vision problems and that the level of discomfort appears to increase with the amount of computer use. A national survey of doctors of optometry found that more than 14 percent of their patients present with eye or vision-related symptoms resulting from computer work. Furthermore, in a survey of more than 2,000 current and former contact lens wearers, time spent in front of a computer (41 percent) was the activity most frequently mentioned as causing discomfort while they were wearing their lenses.

Staring at a computer monitor or the small screens on most devices can lead to a variety of ailments, including headaches, eyestrain, blurred vision, dry and irritated eyes, neck and/or backache, and sensitivity to light. Uncorrected or under-corrected vision problems can be major contributing factors to computer-related eye stress, affecting visual performance and comfort. The good news is that a number of potential eye and/or vision problems can be reduced or eliminated by appropriate adjustment and placement of computer monitors, lighting control, good preventive vision care habits, and regular professional eye care. We would like to provide you with some tips to reduce the painful vision-related symptoms resulting from computer work from Dr. Jeffrey Anshel, a leading expert, practicing optometrist and author of Visual Ergonomics in the Workplace. I have included these tips at the end of this email. Please feel free to use any/all of this information on your site.

Dr. Anshel's Tips may help you take the proper measures to prevent or reduce the development of vision-related problems.

For additional tips, take the "Eye Q's and Views" interactive quiz at computerquiz.jnjvision.com
Dr. Jeffrey Anshel, a leading expert, practicing optometrist and author of Visual Ergonomics in the Workplace offers his tips to prevent or reduce the development of vision-related problems in children and adults.

TIPS:
REDUCE GLARE - Extraneous light, or glare, is the greatest source of eyestrain for computer users. No matter where your computer is relative to a window, adjustable shades, curtains or blinds should be used to effectively control light levels throughout the day. Avoid facing an un-shaded window since the difference in brightness between the screen and the area behind it may be cause eye stress and discomfort. Consider using an anti-glare screen to reduce reflections.

CHECK YOUR CONTACTS - When working at a computer, people spend a lot of time concentrating and blink less frequently - about three times less than normally, as per studies. "Computer work is especially stressful for contact lens wearers," says Dr. Anshel. "Long non-blinking phases may cause the surface of contact lenses to dry out, which can lead to discomfort and a loss of visual clarity." He recommends talking to an eye care professional about ACUVUE OASYS® with HYDRACLEARTM Plus. In a clinical study with 335 contact lens wearers, 9 in 10 (89 percent) patients wearing ACUVUE OASYS said that their eyes felt comfortable, even when watching TV or using a computer for a long time.

ADJUST YOUR MONITOR - Ideal monitor placement is dependent on several factors including an individual's physical make-up and visual capabilities, work tasks, and other workstation design elements. For maximum eye comfort, Dr. Anshel recommends placing the center of the screen five to nine inches below your horizontal line of sight. "You should be looking just over the top of the monitor in your straight-ahead gaze," he says.

TAKE A BREAK - "Our eyes were not made to see at a close distance for hours at a time without a break," says Dr. Anshel. A preventive approach to reducing visual stress includes occasionally looking away from the screen of your computer, PDA, or portable game player. Dr. Anshel recommends the 20/20/20 rule. "Take a 20-second break every 20 minutes. Focus your eyes on points at least 20 feet from your terminal. Keep your eyes moving while looking at objects at various distances," he says.

CONSULT YOUR EYE CARE PROFESSIONAL - The American Optometric Association highly suggests yearly eye exams to ensure ocular health. For individuals whose jobs may require extensive time in front of a monitor, Dr. Anshel suggests a comprehensive eye examination soon after beginning computer work and periodically thereafter. "If, at any time, you experience any vision problems or discomfort, talk to your eye care professional," he adds.

By Stephanie



Posted by: Mike    Source




Did you know?
A recent study shows that nearly 54 million children work at a computer each day either at home or in school. Unfortnately, of these 54 million, those who spend more than two hours each day in front of a computer screen are more likely experience headaches, loss of focus, burning/tired eyes, double/blurred vision, and/or neck/shoulder pain.

Medicineworld.org: Reducing Eye Strain Of Computer Use

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