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Medicineworld.org: Colonoscopy up in NYC

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Colonoscopy up in NYC




More New Yorkers are getting life-saving colonoscopies than ever before, the Health Department announced recently, and people of all races and incomes are benefiting. The test which can detect, prevent, or cure colorectal cancer is generally recommended once every decade for people 50 and older, and earlier for those with a family history of the disease. Four years ago, only 43% of New Yorkers age 50 and older had been screened during the prior decade. Health officials will announce today that 60% of New Yorkers 50 and older had a colonoscopy in the past ten years, an increase of some 350,000 tests compared with 2003. The announcement is being made at the 4th Annual Citywide Colon Cancer Control Coalition (C5) summit at the American Conference Centers (780 Third Avenue, between 48th & 49th Streets).



Colonoscopy up in NYC

In 2003, we set a five year goal to increase the percent of New Yorkers 50 and older who have been screened for colon cancer to 60%, said Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg. Im proud to report that weve reached that goal two years ahead of schedule. Since 2003, colonoscopies increased among New Yorkers of all races, ethnicities, income level and insurance status. That means across the board more cancers will be prevented, and lives will be saved.

While whites were more likely than either blacks or Hispanics to have had a colonoscopy in 2003, the three groups screening rates were nearly equal in 2006, just four years later. More people are getting colonoscopies to prevent or find early colon cancer and it is saving lives, said Health Commissioner Dr. Thomas R. Frieden. The health gap for screening for this important cancer is closing. Weve accomplished a great deal, but we have more to do. We want to increase the colon cancer screening level to more than 80% of New Yorkers over 50 in the next 5 years.

The NYC Health and Hospitals Corporation (HHC) has tested nearly 71,000 New Yorkers over the past 4 years. HHCs partnership with the Health Department, the American Cancer Society and the City Council has enabled our public hospitals to increase access and double the number of patients receiving a colonoscopy the gold standard of colon cancer screening, said HHC President Alan D. Aviles. As a result, we are removing more pre-malignant polyps and diagnosing more cancer at an earlier stage where therapy is most effective.

In 2003, we set a five year goal to increase the percent of New Yorkers 50 and older who have been screened for colon cancer to 60%, said Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg. Im proud to report that weve reached that goal two years ahead of schedule. Since 2003, colonoscopies increased among New Yorkers of all races, ethnicities, income level and insurance status. That means across the board more cancers will be prevented, and lives will be saved.

While whites were more likely than either blacks or Hispanics to have had a colonoscopy in 2003, the three groups screening rates were nearly equal in 2006, just four years later. More people are getting colonoscopies to prevent or find early colon cancer and it is saving lives, said Health Commissioner Dr. Thomas R. Frieden. The health gap for screening for this important cancer is closing. Weve accomplished a great deal, but we have more to do. We want to increase the colon cancer screening level to more than 80% of New Yorkers over 50 in the next 5 years.

The NYC Health and Hospitals Corporation (HHC) has tested nearly 71,000 New Yorkers over the past 4 years. HHCs partnership with the Health Department, the American Cancer Society and the City Council has enabled our public hospitals to increase access and double the number of patients receiving a colonoscopy the gold standard of colon cancer screening, said HHC President Alan D. Aviles. As a result, we are removing more pre-malignant polyps and diagnosing more cancer at an earlier stage where therapy is most effective.

Get checked for cancer is one of the top 10 priorities of Take Care New York, the Citys health policy. The Health Department is two years ahead of schedule for meeting its 2008 goal of having 60% people 50 and older screened for colon cancer. The agency now hopes to push the rate to more than 80% by 2011. This would represent a doubling of the 2003 rate, and would bring screening rate closer to those for breast or cervical cancer.


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Did you know?
More New Yorkers are getting life-saving colonoscopies than ever before, the Health Department announced recently, and people of all races and incomes are benefiting. The test which can detect, prevent, or cure colorectal cancer is generally recommended once every decade for people 50 and older, and earlier for those with a family history of the disease. Four years ago, only 43% of New Yorkers age 50 and older had been screened during the prior decade. Health officials will announce today that 60% of New Yorkers 50 and older had a colonoscopy in the past ten years, an increase of some 350,000 tests compared with 2003. The announcement is being made at the 4th Annual Citywide Colon Cancer Control Coalition (C5) summit at the American Conference Centers (780 Third Avenue, between 48th and 49th Streets).

Medicineworld.org: Colonoscopy up in NYC

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