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Medicineworld.org: Fat fish put obesity on the hook

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Fat fish put obesity on the hook




Everyone knows that eating lean fish helps slim waistlines, but scientists from the Center for the Study of Weight Regulation and Associated Disorders at Oregon Health and Science University in Portland, OR, have found a new way fish can help eliminate obesity. In a study would be reported in the July 2007 print issue of The FASEB Journal, scientists describe the first genetic model of obesity in a fish. Having this model should greatly accelerate the development of new drugs to help people lose weight and keep it off.

As per corresponding author Roger Cone, Being able to model human disorders like obesity in zebrafish allows researchers to understand the molecular basis of disease. This may ultimately increase the efficiency and power of the drug discovery process, thus bringing new medicines to the market faster and cheaper.



Fat fish put obesity on the hook

In the study, scientists caused obesity in zebrafish by introducing the same type of genetic mutation that causes severe obesity in humans. The genetic change blocks the activity of a receptor, the melanocortin-4 receptor, which is at the heart of a device in our brains called the adipostat. The adipostat regulates body weight homeostatically, like the thermostat in a house, and works to keep long-term energy storesa.k.a. body fatconstant. The adipostat is what makes it difficult for people to lose weight and keep it off.

Americanseven childrenare getting fat at an alarming rate, said Gerald Weissmann, MD, Editor-in-Chief of The FASEB Journal, and with this model, we are a step closer to temporarily turning off or diminishing the fat-storing mechanisms that were once crucial to the survival of our species. The zebrafish has become a model animal for the study of a number of diseases because it has a backbone and because its genetics have been well described. This is one more example of how basic experimental biology zoology physiology and genetics in this case can be brought to bear on human problems.

According the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the prevalence of overweight and obesity have risen steadily over the past 30 years. Among adults aged 2074 years the prevalence of obesity increased from 15.0% (19761980) to 32.9% (20032004). For children aged 25 years, the prevalence of overweight increased from 5.0% to 13.9%; for those aged 611 years, prevalence increased from 6.5% to 18.8%; and for those aged 1219 years, prevalence increased from 5.0% to 17.4%. Being overweight or obese increases the risk of a number of diseases and health conditions, including, but not limited to: hypertension, dyslipidemia, type 2 diabetes, coronary heart disease, stroke, gallbladder disease, osteoarthritis, sleep apnea and respiratory problems, and some types of cancer.


Posted by: JoAnn    Source




Did you know?
Everyone knows that eating lean fish helps slim waistlines, but scientists from the Center for the Study of Weight Regulation and Associated Disorders at Oregon Health and Science University in Portland, OR, have found a new way fish can help eliminate obesity. In a study would be reported in the July 2007 print issue of The FASEB Journal, scientists describe the first genetic model of obesity in a fish. Having this model should greatly accelerate the development of new drugs to help people lose weight and keep it off.

Medicineworld.org: Fat fish put obesity on the hook

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