MedicineWorld.Org
Your gateway to the world of medicine
Home
News
Cancer News
About Us
Cancer
Health Professionals
Patients and public
Contact Us
Disclaimer

Medicineworld.org: Psychotherapy For Borderline personality disorder

Back to psychology news Blogs list Cancer blog  


Subscribe To Psychology News RSS Feed  RSS content feed What is RSS feed?

Psychotherapy For Borderline personality disorder




An intensive form of talk treatment, known as transference-focused psychotherapy (TFP), can help individuals affected with borderline personality disorder (BPD) by reducing symptoms and improving their social functioning, as per an article in the recent issue of the American Journal of Psychiatry, a premier psychiatry journal.

BPD, a chronic and disabling condition affecting about 1% of the United States population, has long defied psychology experts and psychiatry experts seeking to treat the illness. Affecting day-to-day functions, symptoms of the illness include unstable relations with others, pervasive mood instability, chaotic variation in self-image, self-destructive behavior, impulsive behaviors (such as sexual promiscuity, substance abuse, or gambling), and intense, uncontrolled rages.



psychotherapy For Borderline personality disorder

In the new study, Mark F. Lenzenweger, distinguished professor of psychology at Binghamton University, State University of New York, and his colleagues at the Weill College of Medicine, Cornell University, examined three therapys applied to carefully diagnosed BPD patients for a period of one year.

The therapys included dialectical behavior treatment, supportive psychotherapy, and TFP, a specialized psychodynamic form of talk treatment, pioneered by Otto F. Kernberg, a co-author of study and professor of psychiatry at Weill-Cornell, that focuses on dominant emotionally charged themes that emerge in the relationship between patient and therapist.

As the patients moved through the yearlong therapys, they were carefully assessed on a wide range of psychiatric symptom and functioning domains, such as depression, anger, social functioning, suicidal behaviors, impulsivity, social adjustment, and various forms of irritability and aggression.

At the end of the year of therapy, a detailed examination of the change revealed that the BPD patients in the TFP therapy showed improvement in ten out of the twelve domains studied.

"The improvements for the TFP patients were not merely statistically reliable, but they represented fairly impressive scientific effects, not just trivial changes," said Lenzenweger. "TFP not only helped reduced suicidal behaviors, but also seemed especially helpful in reducing irritability and angry behaviors".

Kernberg noted, "We are pleased about the progress in the empirical development of a psychoanalytic therapy for borderline patients that focuses on the personality, rather than simply on symptoms, yet also shows improvements in symptoms".

The study also included dialectical behavior treatment (or DBT), which is a cognitively based treatment. Supportive treatment also has its roots in psychoanalytic methods, but differs substantially from TFP.

"This is the first study to compare DBT, considered by a number of to be the standard, with two psychodynamic therapys," said John F. Clarkin, the lead author on the study and professor of clinical psychology at Weill-Cornell.

A major implication of the study is that all three therapys show some effect in alleviating the impact of BPD. The weight of the evidence in the study importantly suggests that TFP and supportive psychotherapy are both viable alternatives to DBT for the therapy of BPD.

"We hope to explore the results of the study further to determine what factors predicted the best outcomes," said Lenzenweger. "And of course, we hope to use these results to further guide our development of basic studies in the neuroscience and genomics of BPD".

The study was supported, in part, by the Borderline Personality Disorder Research Foundation and the Personality Disorders Institute at the Department of Psychiatry, Weill College of Medicine, Cornell University.


Posted by: JoAnn    Source




Did you know?
An intensive form of talk treatment, known as transference-focused psychotherapy (TFP), can help individuals affected with borderline personality disorder (BPD) by reducing symptoms and improving their social functioning, as per an article in the recent issue of the American Journal of Psychiatry, a premier psychiatry journal.

Medicineworld.org: Psychotherapy For Borderline personality disorder

Acute bacterial meningitis| Alzheimer's disease| Carpal tunnel syndrome| Cerebral aneurysms| Cerebral palsy| Chronic fatigue syndrome| Cluster headache| Dementia| Epilepsy seizure disorders| Febrile seizures| Guillain barre syndrome| Head injury| Hydrocephalus| Neurology| Insomnia| Low backache| Mental retardation| Migraine headaches| Multiple sclerosis| Myasthenia gravis| Neurological manifestations of aids| Parkinsonism parkinson's disease| Personality disorders| Sleep disorders insomnia| Syncope| Trigeminal neuralgia| Vertigo|

Copyright statement
The contents of this web page are protected. Legal action may follow for reproduction of materials without permission.