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Medicineworld.org: Watching TV Could Help Your Parenting

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Watching Tv Could Help Your Parenting

Watching TV Could Help Your Parenting
Phase two of The Great Parenting Experiment, which aims to find out whether watching "positive parenting" TV shows can really help address problems like child aggression and tantrums, is being launched by clinical psychologist Rachel Calam of The University of Manchester this week.

The ITV1 series Driving Mum and Dad Mad returns on Monday (17 July), and will follow a new set of families as they try out the "Triple P" parenting programme. This was devised by Professor Matt Sanders from The University of Queensland in Australia, and aims to improve children's behaviour by rebuilding positive relationships, tackling discipline and setting rules and limits.

Teams from both universities are collaborating on The Great Parenting Experiment which will run alongside the series, wherein parents of 3 - 9 year old children will be asked to watch the shows and try out its advice for themselves. Funded by the Respect Task Force, the study will test whether, by adopting the ideas suggested, mums and dads can improve their children's behaviour and reduce their own stress levels.

Dr Calam, of the School of Psychological Sciences, explained: "One group of families will simply be asked to watch the programmes and put into practice what they see, whilst another will be given additional support. Everyone will receive a free self-help workbook at some point during the study.

"Parents will be asked to fill in questionnaires about their child's behaviour, how well they are dealing with parenting and how they are feeling, before and after watching the series and again a few months later.

"The information we gather will help us understand more about how helpful positive parenting TV is to parents and children. We hope that the parents will find that their child's behaviour improves and any emotional problems are addressed, and that their own levels of depression, anxiety and stress will be reduced".

Louise Casey, Government Respect Co-ordinator, said: "We are supporting this research because good parenting is vital to tackling anti-social behaviour and a key part of the Government's Respect Action Plan.

"Parents have an essential role in preventing their children from offending, re-offending or engaging in anti-social behaviour. We know that 60 per cent of three-year-olds with conduct disorders still exhibit problems at the age of eight if untreated, which in turn can lead to anti-social or criminal behaviour as teenagers or adults.

"Research already shows that parenting programmes can improve parenting skills and behaviour, and the Great Parenting Experiment will provide even greater insights".

The first series of Driving Mum and Dad Mad in spring 2005 followed the experiences of five families attending a Triple P group. An average of 4.23 million viewers watched the show, with 500 families taking part in The Great Parenting Experiment in parallel.

All the parents who followed the TV series and used the strategies shown reported improved behaviour in their child, and greater confidence in managing it. The group receiving additional web-based information and email support experienced an even greater improvement, and six months after the series all the families reported long term benefits and continued improvements to their children's behaviour (for more information on phase one please visit www.greatparentingexperiment.net/gpe1.asp).

The team is looking for 1000 families from across the UK to take part in this second phase of the study. Parents interested in finding out more should visit www.greatparentingexperiment.net.



Posted by: JoAnn    Source




Did you know?
Phase two of The Great Parenting Experiment, which aims to find out whether watching "positive parenting" TV shows can really help address problems like child aggression and tantrums, is being launched by clinical psychologist Rachel Calam of The University of Manchester this week.

Medicineworld.org: Watching TV Could Help Your Parenting

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