MedicineWorld.Org
Your gateway to the world of medicine
Home
News
Cancer News
About Us
Cancer
Health Professionals
Patients and public
Contact Us
Disclaimer

Medicineworld.org: HIV Drug To Prevent Cervical Cancer

Back to cervix Blogs list Cancer blog  


Subscribe To Cervix RSS Feed  RSS content feed What is RSS feed?

HIV Drug To Prevent Cervical Cancer

HIV Drug To Prevent Cervical Cancer
Scientists at the University of Manchester are in the process of developing a topical therapy against the human papilloma virus (HPV) which is responsible for pre-malignant and malignant disease of the cervix as well as other genital malignancies.

In the UK a number of thousands of women undergo surgery to remove premalignant lesions of every year. Instead they may be able to apply a simple cream or pessary to the affected area. The discovery may be even more significant in developing countries which lack surgical facilities and where HPV related cervical cancer is one of the most common forms of cancer in women.

Drs Ian and Lynne Hampson at the School of Medicine's Division of Human Development and Reproduction are in the process of developing the therapy from a type of drug that is given orally to treat HIV. This protease inhibitor can selectively kill cultured HPV infected cervical cancer cells and, since it is already available as a liquid formulation, it is possible it may work by direct application to the cervix.

The research, funded by the Humane Research Trust, is would be reported in the recent issue of the journal Anti-Viral Therapy (2006; 11(6): in press) and is also being presented at the International HPV meeting in Prague on 5 September.

Group leader Dr Ian Hampson, who is based at St Mary's Hospital, Manchester, said: "It is very exciting to find such a significant new use for this HIV drug which is already licensed and FDA-approved for oral administration. We are currently exploring the means of delivering this drug directly to the affected tissue. We would then move to a clinical trial that would be supervised by our head of unit Professor Henry C. Kitchener. If this proves successful we could see the therapy available fairly rapidly".

He added: "Anti HPV vaccines are currently in the process of being licensed but, not all lesions will be prevented and not all women will be vaccinated. A non surgical treatment will have significant advantages better preservation of obstetric function, the potential for use in resource poor settings such as underdeveloped countries and it may appeal more to women than surgery.

"We are very grateful for the strong support we have had from the Humane Research Trust, the charity who funded the development of this work."

Professor Kitchener said: "The significance of this finding is that a simple medical therapy could be used in place of surgery which a number of women dislike and fully preserve the cervix. First we need to demonstrate that it can be effective".



Posted by: Emily    Source




Did you know?
Scientists at the University of Manchester are in the process of developing a topical therapy against the human papilloma virus (HPV) which is responsible for pre-malignant and malignant disease of the cervix as well as other genital malignancies. In the UK a number of thousands of women undergo surgery to remove premalignant lesions of every year. Instead they may be able to apply a simple cream or pessary to the affected area. The discovery may be even more significant in developing countries which lack surgical facilities and where HPV related cervical cancer is one of the most common forms of cancer in women.

Medicineworld.org: HIV Drug To Prevent Cervical Cancer

Ectopic pregnancy| Hyperemesis gravidarum vomiting of pregnancy| Obgyn| Menopause symptoms| Pre eclampsia| Seizures in pregnancy| Spontaneous abortion miscarriage| Symptoms of pregnancy| Ovariancancer| Ovarian cancer statistics| Risk factors for ovarian cancer| Role of radiation therapy in the treatment of ovarian cancer| Role of screening in ovarian cancer| Staging of ovarian cancer| Symptoms of ovarian cancer| Treatment of advanced stage ovarian cancer| Treatment of early stage ovarian cancer| Treatment of ovarian cancer| Treatment of recurrent ovarian cancer| What causes ovarian cancer| Who is more prone to ovarian cancer|

Copyright statement
The contents of this web page are protected. Legal action may follow for reproduction of materials without permission.