MedicineWorld.Org
Your gateway to the world of medicine
Home
News
Cancer News
About Us
Cancer
Health Professionals
Patients and public
Contact Us
Disclaimer

Medicineworld.org: A Mother Prompting Her Child To Eat And Obesity?

Back to weightwatch Blogs list Cancer blog  


Subscribe To Weightwatch RSS Feed  RSS content feed What is RSS feed?

A Mother Prompting Her Child To Eat And Obesity?

A Mother Prompting Her Child To Eat And Obesity?
The prevalence of childhood obesity has increased significantly since the 1980s. A number of factors contribute to childhood obesity; however, parents are in a key position to help shape children's eating behaviors and eating environments. A study in the recent issue of The Journal of Pediatrics evaluates the role of mothers prompting their child to eat, the child's compliance with those prompts, and the potential contribution of each to the risk of obesity.

Dr. Julie Lumeng and Ms. Lori Burke from the University of Michigan videotaped and reviewed the tasting of four different foods by 71 mother-child pairs. Two of the foods presented were familiar (a cream-filled sponge cake and potato chips) and two were unfamiliar (a sweet Chinese dessert cake and fried vegetable chips). The scientists recorded how a number of times the mother prompted her child to take a bite and whether the child obeyed these prompts. On average, children complied with their mother's prompts to take another bite approximately two-thirds of the time.

Low maternal education, the presentation of unfamiliar foods, and younger age of the child were factors that predicted more prompting from the mother. Conversely, the mother being obese, the offering of familiar foods, and older age of the child were factors that predicted the child's compliance with the prompts. In children of obese mothers, variables that predicted a higher body mass index in the child were low maternal education, more prompts by the mother to eat unfamiliar foods, and fewer prompts to eat and bites of the familiar foods. In contrast, in children of mothers who were not obese, none of these behaviors were correlation to the child's weight status.

Obese mothers did not prompt their child to eat more than non-obese mothers. However, children of obese mothers complied with their mother's prompts to eat the unfamiliar foods approximately 67% of the time, whereas children of non-obese mothers complied with 52% of the prompts. This could be due either to the children of obese mothers being more sensitive to environmental cues to eat or their mothers' greater awareness of their child's weight; therefore, obese mothers should make more careful efforts towards shaping the child's eating behavior.

Dr. Lumeng states that, "A growing body of evidence suggests that maternal feeding behaviors are correlation to child obesity risk." Prompting may cause the child to eat more, even when full, and therefore teach to child to ignore his/her own hunger cues. However, as Dr. Lumeng points out, "Further work is needed to determine the developmental underpinnings of this phenomenon and the limits of its effect".


Posted by: JoAnn    Source




Did you know?
The prevalence of childhood obesity has increased significantly since the 1980s. A number of factors contribute to childhood obesity; however, parents are in a key position to help shape children's eating behaviors and eating environments. A study in the recent issue of The Journal of Pediatrics evaluates the role of mothers prompting their child to eat, the child's compliance with those prompts, and the potential contribution of each to the risk of obesity.

Medicineworld.org: A Mother Prompting Her Child To Eat And Obesity?

Asthma| Hypertension| Medicine Main| Diab french| Diabetes drug info| DruginfoFrench| Type2 diabetes| Create a dust free bedroom| Allergy statistics| Cancer terms| History of cancer| Imaging techniques| Cancer Main| Bladder cancer news| Cervix cancer news| Colon cancer news| Esophageal cancer news| Gastric cancer news| Health news| Lung cancer news| Breast cancer news| Ovarian cancer news| Cancer news|

Copyright statement
The contents of this web page are protected. Legal action may follow for reproduction of materials without permission.