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Prostate Cancer Blog: From Medicineworld.org

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Do You Read All Of Our Cancer Blogs?

Do You Read All Of Blogs?
This page you have reached is an archive page of prostate cancer blog. If you wish to read current posting of this blog, please go to prostate cancer blog main page. If you wish to read the archived blog postings, simply scroll down to the lower part of the page.

Do you read all of the blogs published by medicineworld.org? Many of our bloggers are busy keeping you updated on the various health related topics. We publish the following blogs at this time.

Cancer blog: I manage the cancer blog with lots of help and support form other bloggers. Through this cancer blog my friends and I try to bring stories of hope for patients with cancer. The cancer blog often republishes important blog posts from other cancer related blogs at Medicineworld.org. If you are searching for a blog that covers wide variety of cancer topics, this may be the one for you.

Breast cancer blog: Breast cancer blog is run by Emily and other bloggers and they bring you the latest stories, news and events that are related to breast cancer. Increasing awareness about breast cancer among women and in the general population is the main goal of this breast cancer blog.

Lung cancer blog: Lung cancer blog is managed by Scott with the help of other bloggers. Through this blog Scott and his friends constantly remind the readers about the dangers of smoking. It's a never-ending struggle against this miserable disease with which a social stigma of smoking is associated.

Colon cancer blog: Colon cancer blog is run by Sue and other bloggers. Sue brings a personal touch to the colon cancer blog since her mother died of colon cancer few years ago. She writes about stories, research news and advances in treatment related to colon cancer.

Prostate cancer blog: Prostate cancer is the most common cancer among American men. American Cancer Society estimates that over 230,000 new cases of prostate cancer occur in the United state every year. This important blog about prostate cancer is run by Mark and other bloggers. This blog brings news, stories, and other personal observations related to prostate cancer.

Medicineworld.org publishes a diabetes watch blog and this blog is run by JoAnn other bloggers. This diabetes watch blog brings you the latest in the field of diabetes. This includes personal stories, advances in diagnosis and treatment, and other observations about diabetes. Improving awareness about diabetes is an important mission of this group.

Janet      

Dec 11, 2005

Do You Read All Of Our Medical Blogs?

Do You Read All Of Our Medical Blogs?
Do you read all of the medical blogs published by medicineworld.org? Many of our bloggers are busy keeping you updated on various medical topics. Medicieworld.org is publishing a wide variety of blogs on different topics.

Breast cancer blog: Breast cancer blog is run by Janet and colleagues. Latest post from this breast cancer blog reads as follows: Chemotherapy Or Hormonal Therapy? - A good friend of mine was diagnosed with breast cancer last year. She had a one-centimeter tumor. Her tumor was estrogen and progesterone receptors positive. No lymph nodes were involved. She subsequently underwent four chemotherapy treatments and was then started on arimidex.......

Lung cancer blog: Lung cancer blog is run by Scott and colleagues. Latest post from this lung cancer blog reads as follows: New Lung Cancer Drug - Novelos Therapeutics Inc. has recently announced that its lead chemotherapy drug to treat non-small cell lung cancer had gained FDA approval to advance into late-stage, or phase III, clinical testing.......

Colon cancer blog: Colon cancer blog is run by Sue and colleagues. Latest post from this cancer blog post reads as follows: Women, Blacks, and Elderly Under treated For Colon Cancer - Women, blacks and elderly patients with advanced colon cancer are less likely to receive chemotherapy than other patients despite evidence that the treatment improves survival rates, according to a study published in the latest issue Journal of the American Medical Association, the AP/Philadelphia Inquirer reports.......

Prostate cancer blog: Prostate cancer blog is run by Mark and colleagues. Latest post from this prostate cancer blog reads as follows: Got Milk? May Be Too Much - It goes without telling that too much of even the best things may be bad for you. Sugar is good for the body, and is required as energy source for the brain and heart, but what happens if we consume too much sugar?......

We have a diabetes watch blog as well and this is run by JoAnn and colleagues. The latest post from this diabetes watch blog reads as follows: Cape Town Will Host Next World Diabetes Congress - Cape Town in South Africa will be the host of the 19th World Diabetes Congress organized by the International Diabetes Federation in Cape Town from 3 to 7 December 2006.......

Heart watch blog: Heart watch blog is run by Daniel and colleagues. The latest post from this heart watch blog reads as follows: High Diastolic Blood Pressure May Protect You During Exercise - Having a high diastolic blood pressure during exercise appears to have a protective effect against exercise-induced myocardial ischemia. This has been reported in a recent issue of the American Heart Journal. Most coronary perfusion to the left ventricle arises during diastole because the vessels are compressed during systole. So, a high diastolic blood pressure during exercise would be assumed to have a protective effect on exercise-induced ischemia. Conversely, a high systolic pressure would be expected to worsen ischemia......

Cancer blog: I manage the cancer blog with lots of help and support form other bloggers. The latest post from this cancer blog reads as follows: Women, Blacks, and Elderly Under treated For Colon Cancer - Women, blacks and elderly patients with advanced colon cancer are less likely to receive chemotherapy than other patients despite evidence that the treatment improves survival rates, according to a study published in the latest issue Journal of the American Medical Association, the AP/Philadelphia Inquirer reports...............

Mark      Permalink

Dec 8, 2005

Got Milk? May Be Too Much

Got Milk? May Be Too Much
It goes without telling that too much of even the best things may be bad for you. Sugar is good for the body, and is required as energy source for the brain and heart, but what happens if we consume too much sugar?

It's not quite the same comparison, but a new study has found that drinking too much milk may increase a man's risk of developing prostate cancer. This study directly contradicts the latest government dietary guidelines released earlier this year. These guidelines recommend that all adults drink 3 cups of fat-free or low-fat milk or equivalent milk products a day. This may include a cup of low-fat or fat-free milk or yogurt, 1.5 ounces of natural cheese, or 2 ounces of processed cheese.

Xiang Gao, PhD, the lead investigator of this new study which was published in the latest issue of the prestigious Journal of National Cancer Institute disagrees with the government recommendations. Gao and his colleagues say that caution should be exerted before embracing this government recommendation. These researchers reviewed 12 studies, conducted between 1966 and 2005, which examined dairy and calcium intake and prostate cancer incidence.

Based on their analysis they report that men who ate the most dairy products had an 11% increase in prostate cancer risk compared with men who ate the fewest. Men with the highest intake of calcium were 39% more likely to develop prostate cancer than men with the lowest.

You may argue that this 11 percent increase in risk is only a modest increase and should not cause too much concern. But, think about it, about 240,000 new cases of prostate cancers are diagnosed in the United State each year. Even a modest increase in the prostate cancer risk caused by the adoption of government guidelines would translate in to a staggering increase in the number of new prostate cancer patients.


Mark      Permalink

Dec 6, 2005

Watch Your Diet To Cut Prostate Cancer Recurrence

Watch Your Diet To Cut Prostate Cancer Recurrence
If you were diagnosed with prostate cancer, have been treated with surgery and is in remission, better watch your diet. A new study suggests that prostate cancer more likely to recur among obese men after surgery.

Two recent look-back studies found recurrence of the disease was more common among obese men. To evaluate this issue further Dr. Christopher J. Kane of the University of California and colleagues evaluated data from 2,131 men who had undergone surgical removal of the prostate for prostate cancer. Twelve percent of men developed recurrent disease during follow-up over an average of 23 months.

There was a significant association between body mass index (BMI) and disease recurrence after factoring in the effect of ethnicity, age and other conditions, the researchers found.

Men with BMIs of 35 or greater were 69 percent more likely to have recurrence of prostate cancer than men whose BMIs were 25 or less (normal weight). Men with BMIs greater than 30 had a 31 percent increased risk of recurrence than men with lower BMIs.

As per the researchers the increased risk of recurrence associated with obesity may be related to excess hormone and difficulty in performing surgery in more obese people. They suggest closer follow up of obese patients who had undergone surgical removal of prostate.

Mark      Permalink

Dec 5, 2005

Advances In Prostate Cancer Treatment

Advances In Prostate Cancer Treatment Photo credit: Bruce Fritz from University of Wisconsin
In olden days we used cobalt radiation therapy machines, which were imprecise caused more side effects for patients with prostate cancer. Now many radiation centers have IMRT units, which are much-advanced machines and uses computer technology to calculate the direction and depth of hundreds of radiation beams emitter by the machine. Technological advances also mean decreasing size of the radiation implants. In olden day radiation seeds were bulky and was imprecise due to its larger size. With all these advances radiation therapy for prostate cancer is getting better.

Two scientists Douglass Henderson, professor of engineering physics, and Bruce Thomadsen, professor of medical physics, have developed a trio of technologies to effectively treat prostate cancer. Central to their innovations are tiny radioactive seeds. Believe it or not! They are just few millimeters in diameter, but when they are properly placed, they can deliver radiation more accurately and effectively than the conventional radiation therapy seeds.

Directionally emitting radioactive sources, a device for placing needles and seeds was developed by Henderson and Thomadsen.

When taken together, this suite of inventions could mean on-the-spot delivery of the most optimal treatment for prostate cancer. Physician may strategically place up to 100 of such radioactive seeds in the prostate. Like a tiny grain of rice, each seed is cylindrically shaped and emits radiation in all directions. When properly arranged this can cause maximum damage to the cancer cells while sparing most of the normal tissue. Because of the smaller size of these implants they can be placed at the borders of the tumor with normal tissue causing only minimal damage to the normal tissues.

Mark      Permalink

Dec 1, 2005

Prolonged Hormonal Therapy Best For Prostate Cancer

Prolonged Hormonal Therapy Best For Prostate Cancer
May be prolonged duration of treatment with hormonal agents is the answer to the prostate cancer. Men with high-risk prostate cancer fare better when they are treated with at least 12 months of hormone reduction therapy rather than with a shorter duration of treatment, new research suggests. This holds true regardless of how fast growing or advanced the cancer is.

Hormonal therapy involves androgen deprivation, which means lowering levels of male hormones, such as testosterone, in the body in an effort to block or slow the growth of prostate cancer. Androgen deprivation therapy is most commonly achieved with medications, but sometimes doctors may opt to have the testes removed to completely eliminate the male hormone.

The results that I am discussing came out of a study, which involved 307 patients who received hormonal therapy after radiation therapy. About half of the patients received short-term androgen deprivation therapy, defined as less than 12 months, and half received therapy for longer durations. The patients were followed for around 47 months. The typical duration of treatment in the short-term group was 6 months, whereas the duration in the long-term group was 26 months.

On follow-up, 63 percent of long-term therapy patients had no apparent disease compared with just 37 percent of short-term therapy patients. Moreover, the 5-year survival rate in the long-term group was 88 percent, significantly higher than the 75 percent rate seen in the short-term group.

The study shows that long-term androgen deprivation therapy used along with radiation treatment improves survival rates for high-risk patients, regardless of the cancer's aggressiveness or disease stage, researchers concludes.

Mark      Permalink

Nov 28, 2005

Low PSA Level Is Not A Guarantee Against Prostate Cancer

Low PSA Level Is Not A Guarantee Against Prostate Cancer
May be you had a normal PSA level during last years annual check up. This normal PSA level is a reassurance to all us about safety from prostate cancer.

A PSA value of less than 4 is generally considered to be a safe level. A new research from Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center in Shreveport suggests that a PSA level of less than 4 does not guarantee complete safety from prostate cancer.

Lead investigators Dr. Caleb B. Bozeman and his colleagues identified 916 patients with abnormal rectal examination findings and a PSA level lower than 4. Most of these patients underwent biopsy to see if they have prostate cancer. Researchers were surprised to find that 81 of these men had prostate cancer.

The investigators are urging combined use of rectal examination and PSA testing while screening for prostate cancer. Obviously as per the study many patients with normal PSA levels may not be diagnosed if PSA testing only is done.

The investigators also found that 1.8 percent of those who had PSA levels between 0 and 0.9 had prostate cancer highlighting the fact that no level of PSA is an absolute guarantee against prostate cancer.

Age was also a significant predictor, with cancer diagnosed among 5.4 percent of those younger than 50 years and among 11.3 percent older than 70 years.

Mark      Permalink

Nov 26, 2005

Does Prostate Cancer Affect Employment?

Does Prostate Cancer Affect Employment?
A new study published in the Journal of National Cancer Institute is answering just this question. The study comes from Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center and it shows that men with prostate cancer were 10 percent less likely to be working six months after their cancer diagnosis than men without the disease, but that after 12 months, the gap in employment status closed.

This study is the first of its kind to examine the impact of prostate cancer on the employment status of men, shedding new light on how the physical effects of this cancer and its treatment may affect their livelihoods.

Now a little secret: about two-thirds of the patients who were still working said that they continued to work out of fear of losing health insurance coverage. (The insurance companies did not hear that.....)

"The fear of losing health insurance may have encouraged some patients who otherwise would have quit or retired to keep working," said Cathy J. Bradley, Ph.D., a health economist for the VCU Massey Cancer Center. "We saw an unemployment disparity among older, less-educated men."

Additionally, those still working decreased their weekly work hours by about four hours, and 43 percent of them said they were not able to work at their former capacity due to cancer treatment-related symptoms.

Mark      Permalink

Nov 22, 2005

One Pill A Day To Beat Prostate Cancer

One Pill A Day To Beat Prostate Cancer
It may be possible one day for some men to pop a pill each day to cut their chances of prostate cancer, as per some researches. These scientists used thousands of prostate biopsy samples to try to identify men at greater risk of developing the disease as well as those more likely to respond to preventative drug treatment.

By analyzing prostate samples from almost 19,000 men, that was collected as part of a seven-year prostate cancer prevention trial of almost 19,000 men in the United States shows that use of a drug called finasteride were 25 per cent less likely to develop prostate cancer.

"We think there are variants in that gene which may make men more susceptible to prostate cancer and we also think that there are variants in that gene that may make men more responsive or less responsive to finasteride," Prof Reichardt who is a Molecular biologist Juergen Reichardt, of the University of Sydney.

Finasteride inhibits testosterone from being converted into dihydrotestosterone. Prof Reichardt hopes the study will eventually lead to preventative strategies for men at highest risk of prostate cancer who would benefit the most from taking finasteride.

Fenasteride is available in Australia for treatment of hair loss in male.

Mark      Permalink

Nov 20, 2005

Hope For Prostate Cancer Patients From Australia

Hope For Prostate Cancer Patients From Australia
I just saw this exciting news that comes across the Pacific Ocean, from Australia. Good news for those prostate cancer patients, who have lost all hopes. This new drug called phenoxidiol is showing promise as a treatment for prostate cancer, particularly for patients whose cancers have not responded to other forms of treatment.

Patients with hormone-sensitive prostate cancer are given drugs that block the effects of testosterone, but those treatments are usually effective only for a period of time. Eventually the cancer cells learn to defeat the hormonal manipulation and grow despite continuation of hormonal therapy. At this point in the course of their disease, there is nothing much to offer in terms of treatment.

The new drug, phenoxidiol, works by reprogramming cells to encourage cancerous ones to die off. In a trial of 26 patients in the United States, those patients given the highest doses had the best response, with few side effects.

"We found that the PSA level, a measure of the activity level of prostate cancer, decreased and we found that some patients clinically improved," says Urologist Dr Robert Davies.

Mark      Permalink

Nov 19, 2005

Smaller Prostate Size May Have More Aggressive Cancer

Smaller Prostate Size May Have More Aggressive Cancer
In men with prostate cancer, a small prostate size is associated with higher grade, more advanced prostate cancer, and a greater risk of disease progression, according to a new report.

"Prostate cancer with a small prostate is worrisome," Dr. Stephen J. Freedland, now at Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina, told reporters. "These patients might need close follow-up regardless of the treatment they get."

Freedland and colleagues evaluated prostate weight and disease severity among 1602 men with prostate cancer that was treated by surgical removal of the prostate.

After adjusting for age, decreasing prostate weight was associated with increased odds of high-grade disease, incomplete removal of the cancer, and extension of the tumor beyond the gland, the team reports in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Smaller prostate weight was also associated with significantly increased risk that PSA levels would begin rising again.

"If a man has prostate cancer, then the size of the prostate can be used to predict its aggressiveness," Freedland said. "I would be a little more hesitant to simply observe a man with a very small prostate. On the contrary, if the man is a candidate for observation alone and has big prostate, I'd be more comfortable with a wait and see approach."

He pointed out that men with prostate cancer who are considering radiation treatment "may want to think more about hormonal manipulation for more aggressive cancers -- but it's unclear whether having a small prostate alone is enough to put them into the high risk category."



Mark      Permalink

Nov 16, 2005

Single Men May Forgo Re-treatment Of Prostate Cancer

Single Men May Forgo Re-treatment Of Prostate Cancer
Single men with prostate cancer that has spread to the bone are less likely to receive repeat radiation therapy to alleviate the pain than their married counterparts, a team at Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia reports.

Dr. Andre Konski presented the results of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group at the American Society for Therapeutic Radiation and Oncology annual meeting, that was held recently in Denver.

Investigators analyzed data from men with metastatic prostate cancer who were treated with various radiation doses. The main objective was to evaluate outcomes based upon marital status.

Konski found that single men were less likely to seek re-treatment than married men.

The difference in re-treatment rates may be due to less social support and encouragement among single men, Konski said. "We need to come up with strategies to support them, such as nurse follow-up and patient navigators who can help them through the healthcare system."

"We are just starting to scratch the surface of this population as far as what they need or their attitudes," he told Reuters Health. He added that these findings "might suggest a more aggressive first treatment, knowing that the patient is unlikely to come back."


Mark      Permalink


Prostate cancer
The prostate is located just below the bladder and in front of the rectum in male. The tube that carries urine runs through the prostate. The prostate contains cells that make some of the seminal fluid. This fluid protects and nourishes the sperm. Prostate cancer usually starts in the gland cells of the prostate. This kind of cancer is known as adenocarcinoma. Prostate cancer is usually a slow disease, but sometimes it can grow fast and spread quickly to other organs.

Prostate Cancer Blog: From Medicineworld.org

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