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Area responsible for self-control

Area responsible for self-control
The results illuminate a very important aspect of the brain's control of behavior, the ability to hold off doing something after you've developed the intention to do it-one might call it 'free won't' as opposed to free will," says Martha Farah, PhD, of the University of Pennsylvania. "It is very important to identify the circuits that enable 'free won't' because of the a number of psychiatric disorders for which self-control problems figure........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 9/12/2007 6:39:05 PM)

Glaucoma surgery in the blink of an eye

Glaucoma surgery in the blink of an eye
Prof. Ehud Assia, of Tel Aviv Universitys Sackler School of Medicine is, quite simply, a rock star in the field of eye surgery. One of a small number of surgeons in the world who currently perform a complicated form of glaucoma surgery, Prof. Assia has developed a novel laser device that promises to revolutionize therapy of the disease. The laser, called the OTS134 for now, is expected to give most practicing eye surgeons the ability to........Go to the Ophthalmology news blog (Added on 9/11/2007 11:36:23 PM)

New Clues to Breast Cancer Development

New Clues to Breast Cancer Development
Physicians who treat women with the breast cancer susceptibility gene BRCA1 often remove their patients' ovaries to eliminate the source of estrogen they believe fuels cancer growth. Yet they also know that anti-estrogen therapies don't work to treat breast or ovary cancer that might develop. That paradox has led researchers to question exactly how, or if, estrogen is involved in cancer development and whether removal of ovaries makes sense. ........Go to the Breast-cancer-blog (Added on 9/11/2007 11:34:51 PM)

Restoring Fertility In Women With Cancer

Restoring Fertility In Women With Cancer
The Oregon National Primate Research Center and the Oregon Health & Science University School of Medicine have been named to a national team of institutions hoping to preserve or restore fertility in women battling cancer. The Oncofertility Consortium, funded for five years by the National Institutes of Health, features participants from five universities and comprises researchers, physicians, engineers, educators, social workers and medical........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 9/11/2007 11:23:08 PM)

Breast Cancer Medication For Bipolar Disorder

Breast Cancer Medication For Bipolar Disorder
The medicine tamoxifen, best known as a therapy for breast cancer, dramatically reduces symptoms of the manic phase of bipolar disorder more quickly than a number of standard medications for the mental illness, a new study shows. Scientists at the National Institutes of Healths National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) who conducted the study also explained how: Tamoxifen blocks an enzyme called protein kinase C (PKC) that regulates........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 9/11/2007 11:21:25 PM)

A key discovery for Fragile X Syndrome

A key discovery for Fragile X Syndrome
An important finding has been made by McMaster scientists about Fragile X Syndrome (FXS), a sex-linked genetic disorder that affects approximately one in 4,000 males and one in 6,000 females. FXS is the most common genetic disorder linked to mental impairment. The affected gene (FMR1) leads to inactivation of the FMR1 gene product, known as the fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP). Brain development in the absence of this protein........Go to the Pediatric news blog (Added on 9/10/2007 9:43:14 PM)

Personalized cancer treatment

Ppersonalized cancer treatment
Researchers and clinicians from around the world will gather in Atlanta, Georgia next week at the American Association for Cancer Researchs second International Conference on Molecular Diagnostics in Cancer Therapeutic Development. The conference is subtitled Maximizing Opportunities for Personalized Treatment, which reflects the potential of molecular diagnostics to provide new strategies for tailoring therapies to fit the needs of each cancer........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 9/10/2007 9:26:53 PM)

Adverse drug events reported to the FDA

Adverse drug events reported to the FDA
A new study shows the number of drug-therapy related deaths and injuries reported to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) nearly tripled between 1998 and 2005. A researcher at Wake Forest University School of Medicine and his colleagues evaluated serious and fatal drug events reported in that eight-year period to the FDA by consumers, health professionals and drug manufacturers, and observed that serious adverse drug events increased........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 9/10/2007 9:12:36 PM)

Managing Children's Fevers

Managing Children's Fevers
Australian parents need to be educated about managing fever in young children because a number of give medicine incorrectly and often unnecessarily, as per a Queensland University of Technology nursing researcher. QUT senior research fellow Anne Walsh conducted the first study into how Australian parents' manage childhood fever as part of her PhD. Her results were reported in the latest Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health. Ms Walsh........Go to the Pediatric news blog (Added on 9/6/2007 10:11:06 PM)

Embryonic stem cells used to grow cartilage

Embryonic stem cells used to grow cartilage
Rice University biomedical engineers have developed a new technique for growing cartilage from human embryonic stem cells, a method that could be used to grow replacement cartilage for the surgical repair of knee, jaw, hip, and other joints. "Because native cartilage is unable to heal itself, scientists have long looked for ways to grow replacement cartilage in the lab that could be used to surgically repair injuries," said lead researcher........Go to the Research news blog (Added on 9/6/2007 10:01:06 PM)

Parenting help for bipolar mums and dads

Parenting help for bipolar mums and dads
Parents with bipolar disorder are taking part in a study that will give them the chance to follow a highly successful parenting skills programme. Dr Steven Jones and Dr Rachel Calam at the University of Manchesters School of Psychological Sciences assess the volunteers current mood and experiences of parenting with an online questionnaire before offering some of them help via an online version of the Triple P Positive Parenting Programme........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 9/6/2007 9:55:05 PM)

developing new method for hearing loss assessment

developing new method for hearing loss assessment
A Purdue University researcher is working on a new technique to diagnose hearing loss in a way that more accurately reflects real-world situations. "The traditional way to assess speech understanding in people with hearing loss is to put them in a quiet room and ask them to repeat words produced by one person they can't see," said Karen Iler Kirk, a professor of speech, language and hearing sciences. "The goal of our research is to develop........Go to the ENT news blog (Added on 9/6/2007 9:37:44 PM)

Mold linked to asthma

Mold linked to asthma
A Cardiff University study has observed that removing indoor mold improves the symptoms of people with asthma. Asthma UK figures show the prevalence of asthma in Wales is among the highest in the world, with 260,000 people receiving therapy for their asthma with the rate of hospital admissions for adults 12 per cent more than anywhere else in the UK. Scientists in the School of Medicine asked patients with asthma living in two areas of........Go to the Allergy news blog (Added on 9/6/2007 5:02:10 AM)

Better communicators make better doctors

Better communicators make better doctors
Physicians who score poorly on patient-doctor communication skills exams are far more likely to generate patient complaints to regulatory authorities, says a new study led by McGill University's Robyn Tamblyn and reported in the September 5 issue of JAMA. Tamblyns team followed 3,424 physicians licensed to practice in Ontario and Quebec who took the Medical Council of Canada clinical skills examination between 1993 and 1996. They discovered........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 9/4/2007 8:09:42 PM)

Avocados May Help Prevent Oral Cancer

Avocados May Help Prevent Oral Cancer
Nutrients taken from avocados are able to thwart oral cancer cells, killing some and preventing pre-malignant cells from developing into actual cancers, as per scientists at Ohio State University. Scientists observed that extracts from Hass avocados kill or stop the growth of pre-malignant cells that lead to oral cancer. Hass avocados are year-round fruits known for their distinctive bumpy skin that turns from green to purplish-black as they........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 9/4/2007 7:47:34 PM)

Exercise, yoga and breast cancer

Exercise and yoga and  breast cancer
Two studies report that exercise and yoga can help maintain and in some cases improve quality of life in women with early-stage breast cancer. The first study observed that resistance and aerobic exercise improved physical fitness, self-esteem and body composition, and that resistance exercise improved chemotherapy completion rates. The second study demonstrated that yoga was especially beneficial for women who were not receiving chemotherapy........Go to the Breast-cancer-blog (Added on 9/4/2007 7:23:11 PM)

Promising Drug Combination For Ocular Melanoma

Promising Drug Combination For Ocular Melanoma
A combination of two drugs shows promise in treating a rare and treatment-resistant type of melanoma that originates in the eye and spreads to other organs, as per a new study led by Duke University Comprehensive Cancer Center researchers. The drugs -- decitabine, which can turn on certain genes in cancer cells, and interferon gamma, an immune system protein -- may work together to cause cancer cell death. "Metastatic uveal melanoma, or........Go to the Ophthalmology news blog (Added on 9/4/2007 7:16:02 PM)

Ibuprofen for children with cystic fibrosis

Ibuprofen for children with cystic fibrosis
The results of a clinical trial, published in late August in the Journal of Pediatrics, indicates that, when used as part of routine treatment, high-dose ibuprofen is safe, and effective in slowing down lung disease in children with cystic fibrosis (CF). Headed by Dr. Larry Lands, Director of Pediatric Respiratory Medicine at Montreal Childrens Hospital of the McGill University Health Centre, the multi-centre study monitored 142 children........Go to the Pediatric news blog (Added on 9/4/2007 7:02:49 PM)

Psychiatrists are the least religious of all physicians

Psychiatrists are the least religious of all physicians
A nationwide survey of the religious beliefs and practices of American physicians has observed that the least religious of all medical specialties is psychiatry. Among psychiatry experts who have a religion, more than twice as a number of are Jewish and far fewer are Protestant or Catholic, the two most common religions among physicians overall. The study, reported in the September 2007 issue of Psychiatric Services, also observed that........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 9/3/2007 10:50:00 AM)

The science of growing neurons

The science of growing neurons
Researchers at the University of Illinois have developed a method for culturing mammalian neurons in chambers not much larger than the neurons themselves. The new approach extends the lifespan of the neurons at very low densities, an essential step toward developing a method for studying the growth and behavior of individual brain cells. The technique is described this month in the journal of the Royal Society of Chemistry - Lab on a Chip. ........Go to the Research news blog (Added on 8/31/2007 5:08:29 AM)

 

Probing History Of Genes With New Tool

Probing History Of Genes With New Tool
The wheels of evolution turn on genetic innovation -- new genes with new functions appear, allowing organisms to grow and adapt in new ways. But deciphering the history of how and when various genes appeared, for any organism, has been a difficult and largely intractable task. Now a team led by researchers at the Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard has broken new ground by developing a method, described in the September 6 advance online........Go to the Research news blog (Added on 9/12/2007 6:07:36 PM)

Aspartame is safe, study says

Aspartame is safe, study says
Looking at more than 500 reports, including toxicological, clinical and epidemiological studies dating from 1970s preclinical work to the latest studies on the high-intensity sweetener, along with use levels and regulations data, an international expert panel from 10 universities and medical schools reviewed the safety of aspartame for people of all ages and with a variety of health conditions. Their study is reported in the recent issue of........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 9/11/2007 11:37:20 PM)

Breastfeeding does not protect against asthma, allergies

Breastfeeding does not protect against asthma, allergies
Breastfeeding does not protect children against developing asthma or allergies, says a new study led by McGill University's Dr. Michael Kramer and funded by the Canadian Institutes of Health Research (CIHR). The findings were pre-published online September 11 by the British Medical Journal. Dr. Kramer James McGill Professor of Pediatrics, Epidemiology and Biostatistics at McGill University and Scientific Director of CIHR's Institute of........Go to the Pediatric news blog (Added on 9/11/2007 11:32:30 PM)

Children who learn heart healthy eating habits

Children who learn heart healthy eating habits
A new study in a mid-August edition of Circulation: Journal of the America Heart Association confirms that when young children learn about heart healthy eating habits, it can strongly influence their heart disease risk during the later part of life. Results from the Turku Coronary Risk Factor Intervention Project have landmark implications on how children should be taught to eat. In this study, a childs fat intake, primarily reduction in........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 9/11/2007 11:28:06 PM)

Preserving Vessel Function After Heart Attack

Preserving Vessel Function After Heart Attack
Researchers have identified the process that causes blood vessels to constrict during and after a heart attack. They've also demonstrated that delivering a vital molecule that is depleted during this process directly to those blood vessels can reverse damage and help restore blood flow. The Ohio State University medical scientists say these findings have the potential to improve outcomes for patients with acute coronary episodes correlation........Go to the Heart-watch-blog (Added on 9/10/2007 10:14:54 PM)

Women less likely to change heart-disease risk habits

Women less likely to change heart-disease risk habits
Smoking, eating fattening foods and not getting enough exercise are all lifestyle habits that can lead to poor health and cardiovascular disease - more so if you have a family history. But scientists at UT Southwestern Medical Center have observed that women don't change these habits as often as men, even when they have relatives with heart disease. The scientists, reporting in the recent issue of the American Heart Journal, observed that........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 9/10/2007 9:34:16 PM)

Implantable device to detect, stop seizures

Implantable device to detect, stop seizures
A small device implanted in the skull that detects oncoming seizures, then delivers a brief electrical stimulus to the brain to stop them is under study at the Medical College of Georgia. MCG is among 28 U.S. centers participating in a study to determine if the neurostimulator device can help patients whose seizures are not well controlled by drugs. The device constantly monitors electrical activity of the brain, gets accustomed to what........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 9/10/2007 9:31:21 PM)

Molecular Clues to Breast Cancer

Molecular Clues to Breast Cancer
New insights into the role of estrogen receptor in mammary gland development may help researchers better understand the molecular origin of breast cancer, as per new research from the University of Cincinnati (UC). About a decade ago, U.S. researchers at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) developed a standard estrogen receptor (ER) gene knock-out mouse model to study the estrogen receptor's role in human diseases. "Unfortunately,........Go to the Breast-cancer-blog (Added on 9/6/2007 10:13:52 PM)

Higher social skills are distinctly human

Higher social skills are distinctly human
Apes bite and try to break a tube to retrieve the food inside while children follow the experimenter's example to get inside the tube to retrieve the prize, showing that even before preschool, toddlers are more sophisticated in their social learning skills than their closest primate relatives, as per a report reported in the 7 recent issue of the journal Science, published by AAAS, the nonprofit science society. This innate proficiency........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 9/6/2007 10:04:52 PM)

Genetic Risk Factor for Rheumatoid Arthritis, Lupus

Genetic Risk Factor for Rheumatoid Arthritis, Lupus
A genetic variation has been identified that increases the risk of two chronic, autoimmune inflammatory diseases: rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and systemic lupus erythematosus (lupus). These research findings result from a long-time collaboration between the Intramural Research Program (IRP) of the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (NIAMS) and other organizations. NIAMS is part of the National Institutes of........Go to the Rheumatology news blog (Added on 9/6/2007 9:59:15 PM)

Preventing variceal bleeding

Preventing variceal bleeding
Beta blockers should be the first line of prevention against variceal bleeding in patients with cirrhosis and portal hypertension. While banding is similarly effective in reducing the occurence rate of such bleeding, it can have fatal complications and is more expensive. These findings appear in the recent issue of Liver Transplantation, a journal by John Wiley & Sons. The article is also available online via Wiley Interscience at........Go to the GI news blog (Added on 9/6/2007 9:57:23 PM)

Soy isoflavone may inhibit rotavirus illness in infants

Soy isoflavone may inhibit rotavirus illness in infants
The soy isoflavone genistin--at concentrations present in soy infant formula-- may reduce a babys susceptibility to rotavirus infections by as much as 74 percent, as per a University of Illinois study published in Septembers Journal of Nutrition. Rotavirus is the primary cause of diarrhea in infants, affecting virtually all children before age five. In the United States, it mainly leads to dehydration, doctors visits, and parents missing........Go to the Pediatric news blog (Added on 9/6/2007 9:47:55 PM)

Mobiles should be kept away from hospital beds

Mobiles should be kept away from hospital beds
Mobile phones should come no closer than one meter to hospital beds and equipment, according Dutch research reported in the online open access journal, Critical Care. Researchers demonstrated that incidents of electromagnetic interference (EMI) from second and third generation mobile phones occurred at a mere three-centimeter distance. In this particular study, the research team examined the effects of General Packet Radio Service (GPRS) and........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 9/6/2007 5:12:31 AM)

Breast Cancer and Aromatase Inhibitor Side Effects

Breast Cancer and Aromatase Inhibitor Side Effects
More than 10 percent of women with breast cancer stopped taking a usually prescribed drug because of joint and muscle pain, as per a new study from scientists at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center. The women in the study were taking aromatase inhibitors, a type of drug designed to block the production of estrogen, which fuels some breast cancers. The therapy is generally given after surgery, chemotherapy or radiation........Go to the Breast-cancer-blog (Added on 9/6/2007 4:51:07 AM)

Primary Care Depression Treatment

Primary Care Depression Treatment
Most patients with depression who are treated by primary care physicians do not receive care consistent with quality standards, as per a new RAND Corporation study. Physicians had high rates of adherence to just one third of the 20 measures of quality that scientists examined and had low rates of adherence to nearly half of the therapy recommendations studied, as per the report in the September 4 edition of the Annals of Internal Medicine. ........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 9/4/2007 7:44:30 PM)

UI professor identifies new eating disorder

UI professor identifies new eating disorder
A University of Iowa professor is making a case for a new eating disorder she calls purging disorder. The disorder is similar to bulimia nervosa in that both syndromes involve eating, then trying to compensate for the calories. What sets the disorders apart is the amount of food consumed and the way people compensate for what they eat. Women with purging disorder eat normal or even small amounts of food and then purge, often by vomiting.........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 9/4/2007 7:26:53 PM)

Halting Lethal Rabies Infection in Brain

Halting Lethal Rabies Infection in Brain
While rabies, an ancient scourge that still kills 70,000 every year in developing countries worldwide can be combated with a series of vaccines today, it nearly is always fatal when it reaches the brain. But now, immunology scientists at the Kimmel Cancer Center at Jefferson have shown how a type of bat rabies infection can be prevented in mice - even after the virus reaches the brain, when it is most lethal. They observed that by opening........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 9/4/2007 7:11:03 PM)

Work time and a person's sleep

Work time and a person's sleep
Work time is the primary lifestyle factor with the largest reciprocal relationship to a persons sleep time the more hours a person works, the less sleep that he or she gets, as per a research studyreported in the September 1 issue of the journal SLEEP. The study, authored by Mathias Basner, MD, of the University of Pennsylvania, focused on a total of 47,731 respondents to the American Time Use Survey (ATUS) conducted in 2003, 2004 and 2005.........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 9/3/2007 1:01:23 PM)

First Common Height Gene Identified

First Common Height Gene Identified
Whilst we all know that tall parents are more likely to have tall children, researchers have been unable to identify any common genes that make people taller than others. Now, however, researchers have identified the first gene, known as HMGA2, a common variant of which directly influences height. The difference in height between a person carrying two copies of the variant and a person carrying no copies is just under 1cm in height, so does........Go to the Research news blog (Added on 9/3/2007 11:32:04 AM)

Cannabis Use On Vacation And Daily Life

Cannabis Use On Vacation And Daily Life
Don't be surprised if some of your colleagues and acquaintances aren't exactly forthcoming about how they spent their summer vacations. Those who appear to have a don't-ask, don't-tell policy when it comes to discussing details of their trips to certain locations in Asia, Canada, the Caribbean, Europe, South America and elsewhere abroad may be among a sub-set of travelers engaging in so-called "deviance" tourism. According to Carla........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 8/31/2007 5:11:24 AM)

 

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Oncologist: Physician or surgeon who had specialized in the treatment of cancer. Medical oncologists usually treat patients with chemotherapy, hormonal therapy and biological therapy, radiation oncologists treat cancer with radiation therapy and surgical oncologists treat patients with surgery. See cancer terms for more cancer related terms.

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