MedicineWorld.Org
Your gateway to the world of medicine
Home
News
Cancer News
About Us
Cancer
Health Professionals
Patients and public
Contact Us
Disclaimer

MedicineWorld.Org: Archive page

New article alert RSS content feed What is RSS feed?
Be the first one to read news and information.
Subscribe to our RSS feed


Back to main page
Suggest Your News Item for Inclusion

Young Type-2 Diabetic Men Suffer Low Testosterone Levels

Young Type-2 Diabetic Men Suffer Low Testosterone Levels
Young men with type 2 diabetes have significantly low levels of testosterone, endocrinologists at the University at Buffalo have found -- a condition that could have a critical effect on their quality of life and on their ability to father children. This study follows research published earlier by these researchers reporting that one-third of middle-aged men with type 2 diabetes have low testosterone levels, requiring therapy for erectile........Go to the Diabetic news blog (Added on 8/27/2008 9:02:59 PM)


Factors may prevent postpartum smoking relapse

Factors may prevent postpartum smoking relapse
Eventhough a number of women quit smoking during pregnancy to protect their unborn children from the effects of cigarettes, half of them resume the habit within a few months of giving birth. By shedding light on the factors that enable the other half to put down that cigarette for good, a study by scientists at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill could lead to programs designed to help women quit and stay quit. As per the........Go to the OBGYN news blog (Added on 8/27/2008 6:56:58 PM)


Alcohol consumption can cause too much cell death

Alcohol consumption can cause too much cell death
The initial signs of fetal alcohol syndrome are slight but classic: facial malformations such as a flat and high upper lip, small eye openings and a short nose. Scientists want to know if those facial clues can help them figure out how much alcohol it takes during what point in development to cause these and other lifelong problems. They have strong evidence that just a few glasses of wine over an hour in the first few weeks of fetal........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 8/25/2008 10:33:04 PM)


Malaria researchers identify new mosquito virus

Malaria researchers identify new mosquito virus
Scientists at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health's Malaria Research Institute have identified a previously unknown virus that is infectious to Anopheles gambiaethe mosquito primarily responsible for transmitting malaria. As per the researchers, the discovered virus could one day be used to pass on new genetic information to An. gambiae mosquitoes as part of a strategy to control malaria, which kills over one million people........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 8/21/2008 9:31:35 PM)


Why a common treatment for prostate cancer ultimately fails

Why a common treatment for prostate cancer ultimately fails
Some of the drugs given to a number of men during their fight against prostate cancer can actually spur some cancer cells to grow, scientists have found. The findings were published online this week in a pair of papers in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences The results may help explain a phenomenon that has bedeviled patients for decades. Hormone treatment, a common therapy for men with advanced prostate cancer, generally........Go to the Prostate-cancer-blog (Added on 8/21/2008 9:19:03 PM)


Childhood ear infections may predispose to obesity later in life

Childhood ear infections may predispose to obesity later in life
Scientists are reporting new evidence of a possible link between a history of moderate to severe middle ear infections in childhood and a tendency to be overweight during the later part of life. Their study suggests that prompt diagnosis and therapy of middle ear infections one of the most common childhood conditions requiring medical attention may help fight obesity in some people. The findings were presented today at the 236th National........Go to the Pediatric news blog (Added on 8/20/2008 8:21:42 PM)


Cervical cancer prevention should focus on vaccination

Cervical cancer prevention should focus on vaccination
The cost-effectiveness of vaccination in the United States against human papillomavirus (HPV), a sexually-transmitted virus that causes cervical cancer, will be optimized by achieving universal vaccine coverage in young adolescent girls, by targeting initial "catch-up" efforts to vaccinate women younger than 21 years of age, and by revising current screening policies, as per an analysis by Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) scientists in........Go to the Cervical cancer blog (Added on 8/20/2008 8:07:23 PM)


How to stop a new type of heart attack

How to stop a new type of heart attack
PACEMAKERS are supposed to protect people from heart attacks. But to do that they have to provide digital as well as biological security. Earlier this year, a team led by William Maisel at Harvard Medical School demonstrated how a commercial radio transmitter could be used to modify wireless communications from a pacemaker (New Scientist, 22 March, p 23). Doctors normally use these signals to monitor and adjust the implanted device, but a........Go to the Heart-watch-blog (Added on 8/20/2008 6:28:14 PM)


79 million US adults have medical bill problems

79 million US adults have medical bill problems
The proportion of working-age Americans who have medical bill problems or who are paying off medical debt climbed from 34 percent to 41 percent between 2005 and 2007, bringing the total to 72 million, as per recent survey findings from The Commonwealth Fund. In addition, 7 million adults age 65 and over also had problems paying medical bills, for a total of 79 million adults with medical bill problems or medical debt. In a new Commonwealth........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 8/20/2008 1:17:59 AM)


How memory deals with a change in plans

How memory deals with a change in plans
You're about to leave work at the end of the day when your cell phone rings: it's your spouse, asking that you pick up a gallon of milk on the way home. Before you head out the door, though, your spouse calls again and asks you to stop by the hardware store too. Based on your knowledge of the area and rush-hour traffic, you decide to get the milk first and the toilet plunger second. But whoops! The phone rings again. This time, it's your boss,........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 8/18/2008 9:16:28 PM)


Oral contraceptives may ease suffering of women with severe PMS

Oral contraceptives may ease suffering of women with severe PMS
A new clinical trial at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill using a popular low-dose contraceptive could uncover a more effective therapy for the 5 to 10 percent of women who suffer from premenstrual dysphoric disorder (PMDD). PMDD is much more severe than premenstrual syndrome, or PMS. The disorder interferes with a woman's ability to function effectively several days out of each month, every month. Physical symptoms include........Go to the OBGYN news blog (Added on 8/18/2008 8:55:25 PM)


In the long run, exertion regulation wins

In the long run, exertion regulation wins
Long-distance running is widely seen as one of the great physical challenges a human can undertake and as the 2008 Summer Olympics commence in Beijing on August 8, a number of eager sports fans will await with baited breath the last event of the Games the men's marathon, held on August 24. For these armchair fans, how marathon runners can complete the gruelling, 42.195 km event physically and mentally may seem like a great mystery. Now,........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 8/13/2008 12:45:02 AM)


Targeted radiation therapy can control limited cancer spread

Targeted radiation therapy can control limited cancer spread
Precisely targeted radiation treatment can eradicate all evidence of disease in selected patients with cancer that has spread to only a few sites, suggests the first published report from an ongoing clinical trial. In the August 15, 2008, issue of Clinical Cancer Research, (published online August 12) scientists from the University of Chicago Medical Center report that targeted radiation treatment had completely controlled all signs of........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 8/13/2008 12:39:33 AM)


Childhood dairy intake may improve adolescent bone health

Childhood dairy intake may improve adolescent bone health
Cincinnati, OH, August 13, 2008Dairy is recognized as a key component of a healthy, balanced diet. However, until recently it was unclear how long-term dairy intake contributes to the a number of aspects of bone health in children, including bone density, bone mineral content, and bone area. A new study soon would be published in The Journal of Pediatrics investigates the effect of childhood dairy intake on adolescent bone health. Dr. Lynn........Go to the Pediatric news blog (Added on 8/13/2008 12:35:59 AM)


Staying ahead of the drug-taking and genetic manipulation

Staying ahead of the drug-taking and genetic manipulation
The race to ensure that researchers stop drug-taking athletes from damaging sport by using performance enhancing drugs or undergoing genetic manipulation is a constant challenge, as per a major four-decade review by three of the World's leading experts on doping in sport. Writing in the recent issue of the European-based Journal of Internal Medicine, they say that significant advances have been made in the fight against drugs in sport over........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 7/29/2008 11:54:36 PM)


Obesity predisposition traced to the brain's reward system

Obesity predisposition traced to the brain's reward system
The tendency toward obesity is directly correlation to the brain system that is involved in food reward and addictive behaviors, as per a new study. Scientists at Tufts University School of Medicine (TUSM) and his colleagues have demonstrated a link between a predisposition to obesity and defective dopamine signaling in the mesolimbic system in rats. Their report appears in the August 2008 issue of The FASEB Journal The mesolimbic system is........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 7/29/2008 11:52:20 PM)


Over-the-counter anesthetic for mammogram pain

Over-the-counter anesthetic for mammogram pain
The simple application of a pain-relieving gel may reduce the breast discomfort some women experience during mammography exams, as per the results of a clinical trial reported in the online edition of Radiology "We now have something that we know reduces discomfort with screening mammography in women who expect higher discomfortlidocaine gel," said the trial's principal investigator, Colleen Lambertz, F.N.P., a nurse practitioner at St.........Go to the Breast-cancer-blog (Added on 7/23/2008 4:55:10 PM)


Why eating less can help the environment

Why eating less can help the environment
An estimated 19 percent of total energy used in the USA is taken up in the production and supply of food. Currently, this mostly comes from non-renewable energy sources which are in short supply. It is therefore of paramount importance that ways of reducing this significant fuel consumption in the US food system are found. In a paper (1) just reported in the Springer journal Human Ecology, David Pimentel and colleagues at Cornell University........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 7/23/2008 4:46:40 PM)


Giving The Right Exercise Advice

Giving The Right Exercise Advice
It is common knowledge that regular exercise supports physical and mental well-being. Despite this and recommendations from health care providers, the majority of patients with chronic illnesses remain inactive. In a new study, University of Missouri scientists observed that adults with chronic illness who received interventions focused on behavior-changing strategies significantly increased their physical activity levels. In contrast,........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 7/23/2008 4:40:53 PM)


Exercise could be the heart's fountain of youth

Exercise could be the heart's fountain of youth
Absence may make the heart grow fonder, but endurance exercise seems to make it younger. As per a research studyconducted at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis, older people who did endurance exercise training for about a year ended up with metabolically much younger hearts. The scientists also showed that by one metabolic measure, women benefited more than men from the training. "We know that the heart deteriorates as........Go to the Heart-watch-blog (Added on 7/23/2008 4:34:28 PM)


 

Black Raspberries Slow Cancer

Black Raspberries Slow Cancer
New research strongly suggests that a mix of preventative agents, such as those found in concentrated black raspberries, may more effectively inhibit cancer development than single agents aimed at shutting down a particular gene. Scientists at the Ohio State University Comprehensive Cancer Center examined the effect of freeze-dried black raspberries on genes altered by a chemical carcinogen in an animal model of esophageal cancer. The........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 8/27/2008 8:48:09 PM)


Heart attack patients who stop statin risk death

Heart attack patients who stop statin risk death
Patients discontinuing statin medicine following an acute myocardial infarction (AMI) increase their risk of dying over the next year, say scientists at McGill University and the McGill University Health Centre (MUHC). Their study was published in a recent issue of the European Heart Journal Using data on British patients who survived an AMI and were still alive three months later, Dr. Stella Daskalopoulou and his colleagues observed that........Go to the Heart-watch-blog (Added on 8/27/2008 7:25:09 PM)


New hope for stroke patients

New hope for stroke patients
If a stroke patient doesn't get therapy within approximately the first three hours of symptoms, there's not much doctors can do to limit damage to the brain. But now scientists report a technique that potentially could restore functions to patients weeks or even months after a stroke. The technique involves jumpstarting the growth of nerve fibers to compensate for brain cells destroyed by the stroke. "In the best-case scenario, this would........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 8/25/2008 10:27:03 PM)


Normalizing tumor vessels to improve cancer therapy

Normalizing tumor vessels to improve cancer therapy
Chemotherapy drugs often never reach the tumors they're intended to treat, and radiation treatment is not always effective, because the blood vessels feeding the tumors are abnormal"leaky and twisty" in the words of the late Judah Folkman, MD, founder of the Vascular Biology program at Children's Hospital Boston. Now, Vascular Biology scientists have discovered an explanation for these abnormalities that could, down the road, improve........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 8/25/2008 10:20:26 PM)


New vaccine to fight multiple influenza strains

New vaccine to fight multiple influenza strains
A universal vaccine effective against several strains of influenza has passed its first phase of testing, as per Dr. Christine Turley of the University of Texas at Galveston. Turley, who is director of clinical trials and clinical research at the Sealy Center for Vaccine Development at UTMB and the study's principal investigator, said that VaxInnate's M2e universal vaccine could possibly protect against seasonal and pandemic influenza........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 8/21/2008 8:44:08 PM)


How addiction develops

How addiction develops
Permanent drug seeking and relapse after renewed drug administration are typical behavioral patterns of addiction. Molecular changes at the connection points in the brain's reward center are directly responsible for this. This finding was published by a research team from the Institute of Mental Health (ZI) in Mannheim, the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) in Heidelberg and the University of Geneva, Switzerland, in the latest issue of........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 8/21/2008 8:30:35 PM)


New test to diagnose osteoarthritis early

New test to diagnose osteoarthritis early
A newly developed medical imaging technology may provide doctors with a long-awaited test for early diagnosis of osteoarthritis (OA), researchers from New York reported today at the 236th National Meeting of the American Chemical Society. By far the most common form of arthritis, OA is a bane of the Baby Boom generation, causing joint pain and disability for more than half of those over 65 nearly 21 million people in the United States. ........Go to the Rheumatology news blog (Added on 8/20/2008 8:16:07 PM)


How rheumatoid arthritis causes bone loss

How rheumatoid arthritis causes bone loss
Scientists have discovered key details of how rheumatoid arthritis (RA) destroys bone, as per a research studyreported in the Aug. 22 edition of the Journal of Biological Chemistry The findings are already guiding attempts to design new drugs to reverse RA-related bone loss and may also address more common forms of osteoporosis with a few adjustments. Two million Americans suffer from rheumatoid arthritis (RA), which causes swelling, pain........Go to the Rheumatology news blog (Added on 8/20/2008 6:29:36 PM)


Alcohol dependence linked to delayed childbearing

Alcohol dependence linked to delayed childbearing
Alcohol use during the teen years can not only lead to subsequent alcohol problems, it can also lead to risky sexual behavior and a greater risk of early childbearing. An examination of the relationship between a lifetime history of alcohol dependence (AD) and timing of first childbirth across reproductive development has observed that AD in women is linked to delayed reproduction. Results would be reported in the recent issue of........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 8/20/2008 1:27:44 AM)


For Earlier Detection Of Autism

For Earlier Detection Of Autism
Recently, Harvard scientists reported that children with autism have a wide range of genetic defects, making it nearly impossible to develop a simple genetic test to identify the disorder. Now, University of Missouri scientists are studying 3-D imaging to reveal correlations in the facial features and brain structures of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), which will enable them to develop a formula for earlier detection of the........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 8/18/2008 8:58:23 PM)


Chemical Liberated by Leaky Gut

Chemical Liberated by Leaky Gut
In up to 20 percent of people infected with HIV, the virus manages to escape from the bloodstream and cross into the brain, resulting in HIV-associated dementia and other cognitive disorders. Now, researchers at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University have found good evidence that a component of the cell walls of intestinal bacteria - a chemical present in high levels in the blood of HIV-infected people - helps HIV to........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 8/18/2008 8:52:20 PM)


Poor coordination in childhood is linked to obesity

Poor coordination in childhood is linked to obesity
Poor physical control and coordination in childhood are associated with an increased risk of obesity in later life, suggests a study published on BMJ.com today. The research contributes to a growing body of evidence on the link between poorer cognitive function in childhood and obesity and type 2 diabetes in adults. The findings are based on 11 042 individuals, who are part of the ongoing National Child Development Study in Great Britain,........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 8/13/2008 12:42:57 AM)


'Erasing' drug-associated memories

'Erasing' drug-associated memories
'Erasing' drug-associated memories may prevent recovering drug abusers from relapsing, scientists at the University of Cambridge have discovered. The team, led by Professor Barry Everitt, was able to reduce drug-seeking behaviours in rats by blocking a brain chemical receptor important to learning and memory during the recall of drug-associated memories. Their research, which was funded by the Medical Research Council, was published in the........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 8/13/2008 12:38:24 AM)


Sleep apnea linked to increased risk of death

Sleep apnea linked to increased risk of death
Sleep-disordered breathing (also known as sleep apnea) is linked to an increased risk of death, as per new results from the Wisconsin Sleep Cohort, an 18-year observational study supported by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) of the National Institutes of Health. Scientists observed that adults (ages 30 to 60) with sleep-disordered breathing at the start of the study were two to three times more likely to die from any cause........Go to the Lung news blog (Added on 7/31/2008 11:29:13 PM)


Right place and right time can trigger drinking

Right place and right time can trigger drinking
Strong cravings for alcohol can be sparked by the mere sight, smell and taste of a person's favorite drink. Responses to such cues that are linked to the positive effects of drinking are a lead cause of relapse in abstinent alcoholics. Using a behavioral animal model, scientists of a new study, scheduled for publication in the August 1st issue of Biological Psychiatry, have observed that the physical surroundings where alcohol cues are........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 7/29/2008 11:56:21 PM)


Fat around the heart

Fat around the heart
When it comes to risk for a heart attack, having excess fat around the heart may be worse than having a high body mass index or a thick waist, as per scientists from Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center and his colleagues reporting in the recent issue of the journal Obesity The study was among the first to explore whether there is a link between fat deposits around the heart, known according toicardial fat, and the development of........Go to the Heart-watch-blog (Added on 7/29/2008 11:50:11 PM)


New Alzheimer's predictors

New Alzheimer's predictors
By combining MRI brain scans and measurements of certain compounds in the cerebrospinal fluid, NYU scientists were able to distinguish individuals who would develop Alzheimer's disease over a two-year period. In a study of 23 people, they found atrophy in areas of the brain involved in learning and memory, and significantly higher CSF levels of phosphorylated tau and other compounds among individuals who would develop Alzheimer's in comparison........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 7/29/2008 11:46:03 PM)


'Statins' linked to improved survival

'Statins' linked to improved survival
For patients receiving kidney transplants, therapy with cholesterol-lowering "statin" drugs may lead to longer survival, reports a study in the November 2008 Journal of the American Society of Nephrology (JASN). "Statin treatment is well established for the primary and secondary prevention of cardiovascular disease in the general population, but its effectiveness in patients with kidney disease is unclear," comments Dr. Rainer Oberbauer of........Go to the Kidney watch blog (Added on 7/23/2008 4:51:25 PM)


Want a reason to love your lower belly fat?

Want a reason to love your lower belly fat?
Fat removed from the lower abdomen and inner thigh through liposuction was found to be an excellent source of stem cells, with higher stem cell concentrations than other areas of the body, reports a Brazilian-based study in August's Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, the official medical journal of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons (ASPS). This is the first study of its kind to examine whether fat tissues from different areas of the........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 7/23/2008 4:43:40 PM)


Human visual system could make powerful computer

Human visual system could make powerful computer
Since the idea of using DNA to create faster, smaller, and more powerful computers originated in 1994, researchers have been scrambling to develop successful ways to use genetic code for computation. Now, new research from a professor at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute suggests that if we want to carry out artificial computations, all we have to do is literally look around. Assistant Professor of Cognitive Science Mark Changizi has begun to........Go to the Ophthalmology news blog (Added on 7/23/2008 4:37:31 PM)


 

Older Blog Entries   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   18   19   20   21   22   23   24   25   26   27   28   29   30   31   32   33   34   35   36   37   38   39   40   41   42   43   44   45   46   47   48   49   50   51   52   53   54   55   56   57   58   59   60   61   62   63   64  
If you wish to publish an article in your name, email us.

Cancer terms:
Oncologist: Physician or surgeon who had specialized in the treatment of cancer. Medical oncologists usually treat patients with chemotherapy, hormonal therapy and biological therapy, radiation oncologists treat cancer with radiation therapy and surgical oncologists treat patients with surgery. See cancer terms for more cancer related terms.

Medicineworld.org: Main Page

Other resources   

Copyright statement
The contents of this web page are protected. Legal action may follow for reproduction of materials without permission.