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Tom Cruise smile comes with a price

Tom Cruise smile comes with a price
UV light-enhanced tooth bleaching is not only a con, but is dangerous to your eyes and skin, says a Royal Society of Chemistry journal. The light therapy gives absolutely no benefit over bleaching without UV, and damages skin and eyes up to four times as much as sunbathing, reports a study in Photochemical & Photobiological Sciences Those looking to match Tom Cruise's glittering pearly-whites would be better off ignoring claims of better........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 1/30/2009 6:31:31 AM)


Avoiding hitting the snooze button

Avoiding hitting the snooze button
Researchers from Queen Mary, University of London have discovered a new part of the mechanism which allows our bodyclocks to reset themselves on a molecular level. Circadian clocks regulate the daily fluctuations of a number of physiological and behavioural aspects in life, and are synchronised with our surrounding environment via light or temperature cycles. Natural changes in the length of the day mean that an animal's circadian clock........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 1/30/2009 6:29:34 AM)


Protein that may explain 'healthy' obesity

Protein that may explain 'healthy' obesity
Mice whose fat cells were allowed to grow larger than fat cells in normal mice developed "healthy" obesity when fed a high-fat diet, scientists at. UT Southwestern Medical Center found in a newly released study. The fat but healthy mice lacked a protein called collagen VI, which normally surrounds fat cells and limits how large they can grow, like a cage around a water balloon. The findings appear online and in a future edition of........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 1/30/2009 6:24:09 AM)


Exercise for chronic back and neck pain

Exercise for chronic back and neck pain
Exercise is usually used to improve physical function, decrease symptoms and minimize disability caused by chronic low back or neck pain. Numerous randomized trials and clinical practice guidelines have supported this practice, and studies suggest that individually tailored, supervised exercise programs are linked to the best outcomes. Nevertheless, there is a lack of knowledge about exercise prescription, including who is prescribing it,........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 1/30/2009 6:20:47 AM)


Blue light destroys staph infection

Blue light destroys staph infection
Two common strains of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, usually known as MRSA, were virtually eradicated in the laboratory by exposing them to a wavelength of blue light, in a process called photo-irradiation that is described in a paper published online ahead of print in Photomedicine and Laser Surgery The article will appear in the April 2009 issue (Volume 27, Number 2) of the peer-evaluated journal published by Mary Ann Liebert,........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 1/30/2009 6:12:29 AM)


Genes linked to Parkinson's side effects

Genes linked to Parkinson's side effects
People with Parkinson's disease usually suffer a slowing or freezing of movement caused by the death of neurons that make dopamine, a key chemical that allows brain cells to send and receive messages essential to voluntary movements. Patients regain the ability to move, seemingly miraculously, by taking L-DOPA or related drugs that mimic the missing dopamine. After a few years on L-DOPA, however, most patients again lose motor control but in........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 1/30/2009 6:06:06 AM)


Who might be interested in whom

Who might be interested in whom
When it comes to assessing the romantic playing field -- who might be interested in whom -- men and women were shown to be equally good at gauging men's interest during an Indiana University study involving speed dating -- and equally bad at judging women's interest. Scientists expected women to have a leg up in judging romantic interest, because theoretically they have more to lose from a bad relationship, but no such edge was found. ........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 1/30/2009 5:57:57 AM)


Weight loss reduces urinary incontinence

Weight loss reduces urinary incontinence
Reducing urinary incontinence can now be added to the extensive list of health benefits of weight loss, as per a clinical trial funded by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK) and the Office of Research on Women's Health (ORWH), both part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The paper reporting the results of the trial would be reported in the January 29 issue of the New England Journal (NEJM) ........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 1/29/2009 6:21:03 AM)


Our senior citizens living longer but on less

Our senior citizens living longer but on less
"This is a wakeup call for America: Congress must act now to ensure economic stability for today's seniors and future generations". Waltham, MAOlder Americans have experienced huge, negative financial shifts that now make it more difficult to enter retirement with sustainable economic security, a newly released study finds. Seventy-eight percent of all senior households are financially vulnerable when it comes to their ability to meet........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 1/29/2009 6:19:52 AM)


Preterm birth and autism

Preterm birth and autism
Recent studies have suggested that autism spectrum disorder (ASD) appears to be more prevalent among children born very prematurely. The early symptoms of ASD are also linked to other conditions correlation to preterm births, such as cerebral palsy, which can make it difficult to correctly screen children for ASD. Because of this, scientists have begun to explore the relationship between preterm birth, cognitive and developmental impairments,........Go to the Pediatric news blog (Added on 1/29/2009 6:11:34 AM)


Stress disrupts human thinking

Stress disrupts human thinking
new neuroimaging study on stressed-out students suggests that male humans, like male rats, don't do their most agile thinking under stress. The findings, published this month in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, show that 20 male M.D. candidates in the middle of preparing for their board exams had a harder time shifting their attention from one task to another than other healthy young men who were not under the gun. Prior........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 1/28/2009 6:24:27 AM)


HPV18 DNA levels are not prognostic for cervical lesions

HPV18 DNA levels are not prognostic for cervical lesions
Perhaps surprisingly, the number of copies of the carcinogenic human papillomavirus type 18 (HPV18) relative to cellular DNA is not linked to the likelihood of progression to advanced premalignant lesions of the cervix, as per a research studyin the January 27 online issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. Two types of HPV are most frequently linked to cervical cancer, HPV16 and HPV18. Prior studies showed that the number of........Go to the Cervical cancer blog (Added on 1/28/2009 6:18:19 AM)


Regular sprint boosts metabolism

Regular sprint boosts metabolism
A regular high-intensity, three-minute workout has a significant effect on the body's ability to process sugars. Research reported in the open access journal BMC Endocrine Disorders shows that a brief but intense exercise session every couple of days appears to be the best way to cut the risk of diabetes. Professor James Timmons worked with a team of scientists from Heriot-Watt University Edinburgh, Scotland, to investigate the effect of........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 1/28/2009 6:15:12 AM)


Poultry disease and its risks to human health

Poultry disease and its risks to human health
Biodesign Institute at Arizona State University associate research scientist Melha Mellata, a member of professor Roy Curtiss' team, is leading a USDA funded project to develop a vaccine against a leading poultry disease called avian pathogenic E. coli (APEC). APEC is part of a large, diverse group of microbes called extra-intestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC). They cause many complex brain, lung and urinary tract diseases in human, animals,........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 1/28/2009 6:11:53 AM)


Differences in thinking styles

Differences in thinking styles
Consumers approach problems, products, and websites differently as per distinct thinking styles, says a newly released study in the Journal of Consumer Research Authors Thomas P. Novak and Donna L. Hoffman (both University of California, Riverside) say consumers tend to think either rationally or experientially and marketers should design experiences for consumers that allow a good fit between the style and the task. The authors describe........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 1/27/2009 6:25:17 AM)


Fast-food diet cancels out benefits of breastfeeding

Fast-food diet cancels out benefits of breastfeeding
A number of studies have shown that breastfeeding appears to reduce the chance of children developing asthma. But a newly published study led by a University of Alberta professor has observed that eating fast food more than once or twice a week negated the beneficial effects that breastfeeding has in protecting children from the respiratory disease. The article appears online in the international journal Clinical and Experimental Allergy........Go to the Allergy news blog (Added on 1/27/2009 6:18:24 AM)


'Happiness gap' in the US narrows

'Happiness gap' in the US narrows
Happiness inequality in the U.S. has decreased since the 1970s, as per research published this month in the Journal of Legal Studies The study, by University of Pennsylvania economists Betsey Stevenson and Justin Wolfers, observed that the American population as a whole is no happier than it was three decades ago. But happiness inequalitythe gap between the happy and the not-so-happyhas narrowed significantly. "Americans are becoming more........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 1/26/2009 11:40:07 PM)


Controversy of using stimulants to treat asthma

Controversy of using stimulants to treat asthma
HOUSTON Just when the Food and Drug Administration is reconsidering the use of stimulants to treat asthma, a new research study offers further evidence to support a University of Houston professor's theory that an opposite approach to asthma treatment may be in order. Richard A. Bond, professor of pharmacology at the University of Houston College of Pharmacy (UHCOP), has been investigating whether beta-2 adrenoreceptor antagonist drugs (or........Go to the Allergy news blog (Added on 1/26/2009 11:35:35 PM)


Was it the chicken salad you ate or a bad swim?

Was it the chicken salad you ate or a bad swim?
A newly released study finds swimming, having a private well or septic system, and other factors not involving food consumption were major risk factors for bacterial intestinal infections not occurring in outbreaks. Outbreaks associated with food, such as the current Salmonella outbreak involving peanut butter that has sickened more than 500 people in 43 states, account for only about 10 percent of intestinal infections, which are medically........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 1/26/2009 11:28:36 PM)


Not just cutting that salt

Not just cutting that salt
Most people know that too much sodium from foods can increase blood pressure. A newly released study suggests that people trying to lower their blood pressure should also boost their intake of potassium, which has the opposite effect to sodium. Scientists observed that the ratio of sodium-to-potassium in subjects' urine was a much stronger predictor of cardiovascular disease than sodium or potassium alone. "There isn't as much focus on........Go to the Heart-watch-blog (Added on 1/26/2009 11:23:34 PM)


 

Nanospheres penetrate melanoma

Nanospheres penetrate melanoma
Hollow gold nanospheres equipped with a targeting peptide find melanoma cells, penetrate them deeply, and then cook the tumor when bathed with near-infrared light, a research team led by researchers at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center published in the Feb. 1 issue of Clinical Cancer Research "Active targeting of nanoparticles to tumors is the holy grail of therapeutic nanotechnology for cancer. We're getting closer to........Go to the Skin news blog (Added on 2/2/2009 6:05:38 AM)


Smoking and depression

Smoking and depression
eenagers who smoke could be setting themselves up for depression during the later part of life, as per a groundbreaking new Florida State University study. Psychology Professor Carlos Bolanos and a team of scientists observed that nicotine given to adolescent rats induced a depression-like state characterized by a lack of pleasure and heightened sensitivity to stress in their adult lives. The findings, published online in the journal........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 1/30/2009 6:27:12 AM)


Sudden cardiac death without recognizable cause

Sudden cardiac death without recognizable cause
In about 10% of cases, sudden cardiac death (SCD) in young people is due to a cardiac gene defect. This was the conclusion drawn by Silke Kauferstein of the Department of Forensic Medicine of the Johann Wolfgang Goethe University, Frankfurt, and her coauthors in the current Deutsches rzteblatt International (Dtsch Arztebl Int 2009; 106(4): 41-7). Sudden cardiac death is defined as unexpected death occurring rapidlycommonly within 1 h of the........Go to the Heart-watch-blog (Added on 1/30/2009 6:25:43 AM)


Fluorouracil-based Therapy May Cure Colon Cancer

Fluorouracil-based Therapy May Cure Colon Cancer
Adjuvant fluorouracil-based chemotherapy can lead to significant disease-free survival in colon cancer patients and may do even better in some, scientists report in an advance on-line issue of the Journal of Clinical Oncology. As lead investigator Dr. Daniel Sargent told Reuters Health, "The primary clinical implications of this research are that adjuvant fluorouracil-based therapy actually cures colon cancer patients -- as opposed to simply........Go to the Colon-cancer-blog (Added on 1/30/2009 6:18:56 AM)


Bone marrow transplant for multiple sclerosis

Bone marrow transplant for multiple sclerosis
Scientists from Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine appear to have reversed the neurological dysfunction of early-stage multiple sclerosis patients by transplanting their own immune stem cells into their bodies and thereby "resetting" their immune systems. "This is the first time we have turned the tide on this disease," said principal investigator Richard Burt, M.D. chief of immunotherapy for autoimmune diseases at the........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 1/30/2009 6:15:45 AM)


New class of allergy drugs

New class of allergy drugs
If you've ever wondered why some allergic reactions progress quickly and may even become fatal, a new research report reported in the February 2009 issue of the Journal of Leukocyte Biology (http://www.jleukbio.org) provides an important part of the answer. In the report, researchers from Queen's University of Belfast, University of Oxford and Trinity College Dublin show for the first time that eotaxin, a chemical that helps immune cells locate........Go to the Allergy news blog (Added on 1/30/2009 6:09:30 AM)


How vision sends its message to the brain

How vision sends its message to the brain
Researchers have known for more than 200 years that vision begins with a series of chemical reactions when light strikes the retina, but the specific chemical processes have largely been a mystery. A team of scientists from the United States and Switzerland, have she new light on this process by "capturing" this chemical communication for future study. This research, reported in the February 2009 issue of The FASEB Journal........Go to the Ophthalmology news blog (Added on 1/30/2009 6:01:55 AM)


Anxiety and depression and cancellation rates

Anxiety and depression and cancellation rates
Anxiety and depression before and during fertility therapy does not affect the likelihood of a woman becoming pregnant or of her cancelling her therapy, as per a research studypublished in Europe's leading reproductive medicine journal, Human Reproduction [1] on Thursday 29 January. Dr Bea Lintsen, a doctor at the Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Radboud University Nijmegen Medical Centre (The Netherlands), and her colleagues used........Go to the OBGYN news blog (Added on 1/29/2009 6:22:46 AM)


Stunning findings at memory research

Stunning findings at memory research
Like countless neuroresearchers around the world, Northwestern University Professor Nelson Spruston knew H. M. well -- his personal story and the sound of his voice. But it wasn't until H. M. died last month that Spruston learned H. M.'s full name -- Henry Gustav Molaison. In 1953, Molaison, aged 27, had brain surgery to control his severe epilepsy. Both medial temporal lobes were removed, the first and only surgery of its kind. His seizures........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 1/29/2009 6:18:03 AM)


Finding endometrial cancer early

Finding endometrial cancer early
Cancer is a genetic disease. It occurs when changes take place in the genes that regulate cell division, cell growth, cell death, cell signalling and blood vessel formation either due to mutations caused by external factors such as smoking or radiation or due to inherited changes. This interaction between defective genes and environmental factors means that cancer is an extremely complex disease. Cancer of the uterus, or endometrial........Go to the Uterine cancer blog (Added on 1/29/2009 6:14:06 AM)


What's the link between menopause and heart disease?

What's the link between menopause and heart disease?
An evaluation of 203 women as part of the multifaceted Los Angeles Atherosclerosis Study (LAAS) observed that those who transitioned more quickly through menopause were at increased risk for a higher rate of progression of "preclinical atherosclerosis" narrowing of arteries caused by the thickening of their walls. Heart specialist C. Noel Bairey Merz, M.D., is principal investigator of the study. She is director of the Women's Heart Center........Go to the OBGYN news blog (Added on 1/28/2009 6:29:08 AM)


Sequential and alternating chemotherapy and radiatio

Sequential and alternating chemotherapy and radiatio
Larynx cancer patients treated with alternating cycles of chemotherapy and radiation have similar outcomes to patients treated with chemotherapy followed by radiation, as per data from a randomized controlled trial in the January 27 online issue of the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. Prior trials in patients with locally advanced larynx cancer showed that chemotherapy followed by radiation was as effective as total removal of the........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 1/28/2009 6:20:01 AM)


How memories change in the brain over time

How memories change in the brain over time
A new brain imaging study illustrates what happens to memories as time goes by. The study, in the January 28 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience, shows that distinct brain structures are involved in recalling recent and older events. The findings support earlier studies of memory-impaired patients with damage limited to the hippocampus. These patients show deficits in learning new information and in recalling events that occurred just........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 1/28/2009 6:13:31 AM)


Will acupuncture relieve your pain?

Will acupuncture relieve your pain?
The pain relieving effects of acupuncture compared with placebo are small and seem to lack clinical relevance, as per a research studypublished on bmj.com today. Scientists at the Nordic Cochrane Centre in Copenhagen analysed evidence from thirteen acupuncture pain trials involving over 3,000 patients. The trials compared three arms of therapy (real acupuncture, placebo or 'pretend' acupuncture or no acupuncture) for a broad range of common........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 1/28/2009 6:09:49 AM)


Neural mechanisms of empathy

Neural mechanisms of empathy
Is it possible to share a pain that you observe in another but have never actually experienced yourself? A newly released study uses a sophisticated brain-imaging technique to try and answer this question. The research, published by Cell Press in the January 29th issue of the journal Neuron, provides insight into brain mechanisms involved in empathy. Brain-imaging studies have shown similar patterns of brain activity when subjects feel their........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 1/28/2009 6:06:22 AM)


Huge burden of diabetes

Huge burden of diabetes
In the United States, nearly 13 percent of adults age 20 and older have diabetes, but 40 percent of them have not been diagnosed, as per epidemiologists from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), whose study includes newly available data from an Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT). Diabetes is particularly common in the elderly: nearly one-third of those age 65 and older have the........Go to the Diabetic news blog (Added on 1/27/2009 6:24:01 AM)


Statins may treat blood vessel disorder

Statins may treat blood vessel disorder
In a finding that could save thousands of lives a year, University of Utah School of Medicine scientists have shown that a blood vessel disorder leading to unpredictable, sometimes fatal, hemorrhagic strokes, seizures, paralysis or other problems is treatable with the same statin drugs that millions of people take to control high cholesterol. If the results of a study in mice are confirmed in a pilot trial with people, statins could provide........Go to the Heart-watch-blog (Added on 1/26/2009 11:37:50 PM)


Gene therapy for rheumatoid arthritis

Gene therapy for rheumatoid arthritis
Scientists have reported the first clinical evidence that gene treatment reduces symptoms in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, an important milestone for this promising therapy which has endured a sometimes turbulent past. Described in the recent issue of the journal Human Gene Therapy the findings stem from a study of two patients with severe rheumatoid arthritis conducted in Gera number of and led by an investigator at Beth Israel Deaconess........Go to the Rheumatology news blog (Added on 1/26/2009 11:32:26 PM)


Not all breast cancers are the same

Not all breast cancers are the same
Not all breast cancers are the same, and not all will have fatal consequences. But because clinicians find it difficult to accurately determine which tumors will metastasize, a number of patients do not receive the treatment fits their disease. Tel Aviv University has now refined breast cancer identification so that each course of therapy is as individual as the woman being treated. The new approach -- based on a combination of MRI and........Go to the Breast-cancer-blog (Added on 1/26/2009 11:30:58 PM)


School children who receive more recess

School children who receive more recess
School children who receive more recess behave better and are likely to learn more, as per a large study of third-graders conducted by scientists at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University. The study, published in Pediatrics, suggests that a daily break of 15 minutes or more in the school day may play a role in improving learning, social development, and health in elementary school children. The study's principal........Go to the Pediatric news blog (Added on 1/26/2009 11:26:02 PM)


 

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Cancer terms:
Oncologist: Physician or surgeon who had specialized in the treatment of cancer. Medical oncologists usually treat patients with chemotherapy, hormonal therapy and biological therapy, radiation oncologists treat cancer with radiation therapy and surgical oncologists treat patients with surgery. See cancer terms for more cancer related terms.

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