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Hope to emphysema patients

Hope to emphysema patients
Patients in the Valley with emphysema might soon be breathing a little easier thanks to a new airway bypass study called the Exhale Airways Stents for Emphysema (EASE) trial. The trial principal is Dr. Karl Van Gundy aided by researchers Drs. Michael Peterson, Jose Joseph, Timothy Evans and Kathryn Bilello all pulmonologists at UCSF Fresno Medical Education Program. The study is a multi-center, international trial that is designed to evaluate........Go to the Lung news blog (Added on 10/21/2008 9:22:31 PM)


Chronic inflammation can help nurture skin cancer

Chronic inflammation can help nurture skin cancer
Inflammation, a frontline defense against infection or disease, can help nurture skin cancer, scientists have found. IDO, an enzyme that works like a firefighter to keep inflammation under control, can be commandeered to protect early cancerous cells, say Medical College of Georgia scientists studying an animal model of chronic inflammation and skin cancer. "Inflammation should really help prevent a tumor," says Dr. Andrew Mellor,........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 10/21/2008 9:14:54 PM)


Bird flu vaccine protects people and pets

Bird flu vaccine protects people and pets
A single vaccine could be used to protect chickens, cats and humans against deadly flu pandemics, as per an article reported in the recent issue of the Journal of General Virology The vaccine protects birds and mammals against different flu strains and can even be given to birds while they are still in their eggs, allowing the mass vaccination of wild birds. The emergence of bird flu has posed a major challenge to researchers designing........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 10/20/2008 5:46:53 AM)


Educational materials can alter young women's attitudes about tanning

Educational materials can alter young women's attitudes about tanning
A new study indicates that educational literature can influence young women's use of indoor tanning, not by raising their fear of skin cancer but by changing their attitudes about indoor tanning and promoting healthier alternatives for changing appearance. The study is reported in the December 1, 2008 issue of CANCER, a peer-evaluated journal of the American Cancer Society. Each year there are more than 1.3 million skin cancer diagnoses in........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 10/20/2008 5:43:42 AM)


When a light goes on during thought processes

When a light goes on during thought processes
A nerve cell is a major hub for the exchange of valuable information. The nose, eyes, ears, and other sense organs perceive our environment through various antennae known as receptors. The numerous stimuli are then passed on to the neurons. All of this information is collected, processed, and finally transferred to specific brain centers at these hubs - the human brain consists of almost 100 billion nerve cells. The nerve cell uses a special........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 10/16/2008 11:01:24 PM)


Prostate cancer gene test provides new early detection

Prostate cancer gene test provides new early detection
Arnhem, 16 October 2008 Prostate cancer (PCa) is one of the most common male cancers in the Western world. Currently, early detection of PCa depends on an abnormal digital rectal examination and an elevated prostate-specific-antigen (PSA) level requiring a prostate biopsy, often linked to anxiety, discomfort, complications, and heavy expenses. The prostate-cancer-gene-3 (PCA3) test is a new PCa gene-based marker carried out with a urine........Go to the Prostate-cancer-blog (Added on 10/16/2008 10:59:10 PM)


Aspirin does not prevent heart attacks in patients with diabetes

Aspirin does not prevent heart attacks in patients with diabetes
Taking regular aspirin and antioxidant supplements does not prevent heart attacks even in high risk groups with diabetes and asymptomatic arterial disease, and aspirin should only be given to patients with established heart disease, stroke or limb arterial disease, as per a research studypublished recently on bmj.com. In light of these findings, and the evidence from six other well controlled trials, the prescribing practice of doctors and........Go to the Heart-watch-blog (Added on 10/16/2008 10:49:46 PM)


Brain-nourishing molecule may predict schizophrenia relapse

Brain-nourishing molecule may predict schizophrenia relapse
A factor that helps optimize brain formation and function may also provide clues about whether patients suffering with schizophrenia are headed toward relapse, scientists say. Over the next two- and one-half years, they are regularly measuring levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, or BDNF, in the blood of patients with schizophrenia to see if the pattern of their rise and fall is a good indicator that patients are headed for trouble,........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 10/15/2008 5:52:23 PM)


A walk in the park improves attention in children with ADHD

A walk in the park improves attention in children with ADHD
For children with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) tasks that require concentration such as doing homework or taking a test can be very difficult. A simple, inexpensive remedy may be a "dose of nature". A study conducted at the University of Illinois shows that children with ADHD demonstrate greater attention after a 20-minute walk in a park than after a similar walk in a downtown area or a residential neighborhood. The........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 10/15/2008 5:42:14 PM)


Searching the Internet increases brain function

Searching the Internet increases brain function
UCLA researchers have observed that for computer-savvy middle-aged and elderly adults, searching the Internet triggers key centers in the brain that control decision-making and complex reasoning. The findings demonstrate that Web search activity may help stimulate and possibly improve brain function. The study, the first of its kind to assess the impact of Internet searching on brain performance, is currently in press at the American Journal........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 10/14/2008 10:17:46 PM)


Why do women get more cavities than men?

Why do women get more cavities than men?
Reproduction pressures and rising fertility explain why women suffered a more rapid decline in dental health than did men as humans transitioned from hunter-and-gatherers to farmers and more sedentary pursuits, says a University of Oregon anthropologist. The conclusion follows a comprehensive review of records of the frequencies of dental cavities in both prehistoric and living human populations from research done around the world. A driving........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 10/14/2008 10:04:08 PM)


How brain sees what you do not see

How brain sees what you do not see
Blindsight is a phenomenon in which patients with damage in the primary visual cortex of the brain can tell where an object is eventhough they claim they cannot see it. A research team led by Prof. Tadashi Isa and Dr. Masatoshi Yoshida of the National Institute for Physiological Sciences, Japan, provides compelling evidence that blindsight occurs because visual information is conveyed bypassing the primary visual cortex. Japan Science and........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 10/14/2008 7:54:46 PM)


Researchers continue to find genes for type 1 diabetes

Researchers continue to find genes for type 1 diabetes
Genetics scientists have identified two novel gene locations that raise the risk of type 1 diabetes. As they continue to reveal pieces of the complicated genetic puzzle for this disease, the scientists expect to improve predictive tests and devise preventive strategies. "As we add to our knowledge of the biology of type 1 diabetes and better understand details of the disease's genetic risk, we will be able to develop better diagnostic tests........Go to the Diabetes-watch-blog (Added on 10/14/2008 7:52:14 PM)


Steroid Treatment Offers No Benefit In Preemies

Steroid Treatment Offers No Benefit In Preemies
Results of a multicenter study led by Johns Hopkins Children's Center challenge the longstanding practice of treating premature babies with hydrocortisone, a steroid believed to fight inflammation and prevent lung disease. The scientists observed that such therapy offers little or no benefit and that low cortisol levels are not even necessarily harmful. High cortisol levels, conversely, appeared to increase the risk of dangerous bleeding in the........Go to the Pediatric news blog (Added on 10/9/2008 10:21:30 PM)


Women, the elderly and weekend admissions

Women, the elderly and weekend admissions
Women, the elderly, and patients admitted to the emergency department on weekends are all less likely to receive same-day coronary angioplasty for a life-threatening heart attack in Florida, University of South Florida scientists found. Their study was published this month in the American Journal of Cardiology. Angioplasty, also known according tocutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), uses a catheter-guided balloon to open a blocked artery........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 10/8/2008 9:43:11 PM)


Guidelines urge physical activity during pregnancy

Guidelines urge physical activity during pregnancy
Moderate physical activity during pregnancy does not contribute to low birth weight, premature birth or miscarriage and may actually reduce the risk of complications, as per a Michigan State University professor who contributed to the U.S. government's first-ever guidelines on physical activity. Kinesiology professor James Pivarnik and doctoral students Lanay Mudd and Erin Kuffel wrote the section on pregnancy and postpartum activity as part........Go to the OBGYN news blog (Added on 10/8/2008 9:37:46 PM)


The pepperoni pizza hypothesis

The pepperoni pizza hypothesis
What's the worst that could happen after eating a slice of pepperoni pizza? A little heartburn, for most people. But for up to a million women in the U.S., enjoying that piece of pizza has painful consequences. They have a chronic bladder condition that causes pelvic pain. Spicy food -- as well as citrus, caffeine, tomatoes and alcohol-- can cause a flare in their symptoms and intensify the pain. It was thought that the spike in their........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 10/8/2008 9:34:08 PM)


Wheezing and asthma in young children

Wheezing and asthma in young children
The diagnosis of asthma in a young child may well be more challenging to pediatricians than previously appreciated, as per a review of research and clinical experience literature by Howard Eigen, M.D., of the Indiana University School of Medicine and Riley Hospital for Children appearing in the October 2008 issue of Clinical Pediatrics "Wheezing can be serious," said Dr. Eigen, the Billie Lou Wood Professor of Pediatrics at the IU School of........Go to the Allergy news blog (Added on 10/7/2008 10:38:08 PM)


Novel Imaging Approach For Atrial Fibrillation

Novel Imaging Approach For Atrial Fibrillation
University of Utah scientists have developed a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-based method for detecting and quantifying injury to the wall of the heart's left atrium in patients who have undergone a procedure to treat atrial fibrillation. The results of the study are reported in the Oct. 7, 2008, issue of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. Atrial fibrillation (AF) is an arrhythmia, or abnormal heart rhythm, that involves........Go to the Heart-watch-blog (Added on 10/7/2008 10:22:59 PM)


African-Americans may be at higher risk of stroke

African-Americans may be at higher risk of stroke
Cerebral microbleeds, which are small bleeds within the brain, appear to be more common in African-Americans than in Caucasians, increasing the likelihood of having a stroke, as per a research studyreported in the October 7, 2008, issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. These types of brain lesions can be an important indicator for stroke. For the study, 87 people from the Washington, DC, area who had........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 10/6/2008 10:37:34 PM)


 

Nutrition advice best served with family in mind

Nutrition advice best served with family in mind
Scientists at the University of Sheffield and Royal Holloway, University of London will argue today (21 October 2008) that the nation's diet is unlikely to improve significantly if healthy eating policies fail to take into account the diverse nature of contemporary family life. Recent government initiatives have attempted to change people's dietary behaviour and the amount of exercise they take. But, despite compelling evidence of the need........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 10/21/2008 9:29:21 PM)


Link between health-related behaviors and grades

Link between health-related behaviors and grades
Lack of sleep, excessive television/computer screen time, stress, gambling, alcohol and tobacco use and other health-related issues are taking a toll on college students' academic performance, as per a research studyreleased by the University of Minnesota Boynton Health Service. "Our study shows that there is a direct link between college students' health and their academic achievement. This is the first time that anything like this has been........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 10/21/2008 9:09:47 PM)


Smell of smoke does not trigger relapse in quitters

Smell of smoke does not trigger relapse in quitters
Research into tobacco dependence published online in the recent issue of Addiction, has shown that recent ex-smokers who find exposure to other people's cigarette smoke pleasant are not any more likely to relapse than those who find it unpleasant. Led by Dr Hayden McRobbie and Professor Peter Hajek of the Tobacco Dependence Research Unit at Barts and The London School of Medicine and Dentistry, scientists examined the hypothesis that those........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 10/20/2008 5:54:44 AM)


How neuronal activity leads to Alzheimer's protein cleavage

How neuronal activity leads to Alzheimer's protein cleavage
Amyloid precursor protein (APP), whose cleavage product, amyloid-b (Ab), builds up into fibrous plaques in the brains of Alzheimer's disease patients, jumps from one specialized membrane microdomain to another to be cleaved, report Sakurai et al. Eventhough there is no definitive evidence that Ab plaques are the direct cause of Alzheimer's disease, there is much circumstantial evidence to support this. And working on this hypothesis,........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 10/20/2008 5:45:30 AM)


High-altitude climbing causes subtle loss of brain cells and motor function

High-altitude climbing causes subtle loss of brain cells and motor function
A study of professional mountain climbers has shown that high-altitude exposure can cause subtle white and grey matter changes to the area of the brain involved in motor activity, as per the recent issue of the European Journal of Neurology Italian scientists took MRI scans of nine world-class mountain climbers, who had been climbing for at least 10 years, before and after expeditions to Mount Everest (8,848 metres) and K2 (8,611 metres)........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 10/16/2008 11:02:56 PM)


Genetic based human diseases are an ancient evolutionary legacy

Genetic based human diseases are an ancient evolutionary legacy
The Human Genome Project that deciphered the human genetic code, uncovered thousands of genes that, if mutated, are involved in human genetic diseases. The genomes of a number of other organisms were deciphered in parallel. This now allows the evolution of these disease associated genes to be systematically studied. Tomislav Domazet-LoŇ°o and Diethard Tautz from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology in Plon (Gera number of) have........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 10/16/2008 10:57:47 PM)


Early exposure to drugs, alcohol creates lifetime of health risk

Early exposure to drugs, alcohol creates lifetime of health risk
People who began drinking and using marijuana regularly previous to their 15th birthday face a higher risk of early pregnancy, as well as a pattern of school failure, substance dependence, sexually-transmitted disease and criminal convictions that lasts into their 30s. A study published online by the journal Psychological Science has been able to sort out for the first time the difficult question of whether it's bad kids who do drugs, or........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 10/16/2008 10:39:42 PM)


Governments urged to fight global child killer

Governments urged to fight global child killer
Pneumococcal disease, one of the world's leading causes of death and serious illness (1), must be recognised as an urgent global health issue together with HIV, malaria and TB, say the UK All-Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) on Pneumococcal Disease Prevention in the Developing World in a report launching at the House of Lords today. Between 700,000 and one million children under the age of five die each year from pneumococcal disease,........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 10/15/2008 5:54:44 PM)


Genetic analysis predicts whether liver cancer likely to recur

Genetic analysis predicts whether liver cancer likely to recur
Scientists are poised to unlock the genetic secrets stored in hundreds of thousands of cancer biopsy samples locked in long-term storage and previously believed to be useless for modern genetic research. With the aid of a new technique developed by Howard Hughes Medical Institute researchers, researchers can now reconstruct thousands of genes that are "shredded" into tiny pieces when tissue samples are treated with a chemical fixative and........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 10/15/2008 5:45:18 PM)


High-school social skills predict better earnings than test scores

High-school social skills predict better earnings than test scores
Ten years after graduation, high-school students who had been rated as conscientious and cooperative by their teachers were earning more than classmates who had similar test scores but fewer social skills, said a new University of Illinois study. The study's findings challenge the idea that racial, ethnic, and socioeconomic gaps in educational attainment and earnings can be narrowed solely by emphasizing cognitive skills, said Christy........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 10/15/2008 5:38:58 PM)


Vitamin B does not slow cognitive decline in Alzheimer's

Vitamin B does not slow cognitive decline in Alzheimer's
A clinical trial led by Paul S. Aisen, M.D., professor of neurosciences at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine, showed that high-dose vitamin B supplements did not slow the rate of cognitive decline in patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer disease. The study would be reported in the October 15 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA). Aisen is director of the Alzheimer's Disease Cooperative........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 10/14/2008 9:47:07 PM)


Alzheimer's disease and blood pressure

Alzheimer's disease and blood pressure
A new study (http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.bihy.2008.04.006) published in Bioscience Hypotheses (http://www.elsevier.com/locate/issn/1756-2392), a recently launched Elsevier journal, proposes that some people suffering from Alzheimer's disease experience a reduction in their hypertension because of cognitive decline. Publications relating to dementia and blood pressure have been evaluated by the paper's author Dr Sven Kurbel of the Osijek........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 10/14/2008 8:25:51 PM)


A low-cholesterol diet leaves a bitter taste in the gut

A low-cholesterol diet leaves a bitter taste in the gut
One role for the proteins on the tongue that sense bitter tasting substances, type 2 taste receptors (T2Rs), is to limit ingestion of these substances, as a large number of natural bitter compounds are known to be toxic. T2Rs are also found in the gut, and it has been suggested that there they have a similar role to their function in the mouth (i.e., they might limit intestinal toxin absorption). Data to support this idea has now been generated........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 10/9/2008 10:39:22 PM)


Communication Between Neurons And Muscle Cells

Communication Between Neurons And Muscle Cells
You can't raise a finger without your brain directing muscle cells, and researchers have figured out another reason that commonly works so well. A neuron sends a message, or neurotransmitter, to the muscle cell to tell it what to do. To get the message, the receiving cell must have a receptor. Oddly, the unstable protein rapsyn is responsible for anchoring the receptor so it's properly positioned to catch the message. Medical College of........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 10/9/2008 10:28:00 PM)


Human Mind and Future Infrastructure Systems

Human Mind and Future Infrastructure Systems
The National Science Foundation (NSF) Office of Emerging Frontiers in Research and Innovation (EFRI) has announced 12 grants for fiscal year 2008, awarding a total of $23,779,056 over four years to 54 researchers representing 20 institutions. Interdisciplinary teams will pursue transformative, fundamental research in two areas of great promise: understanding the brain and how its abilities may be used through cognitive optimization and........Go to the Research news blog (Added on 10/8/2008 9:59:33 PM)


Circadian clock may be critical for remembering

Circadian clock may be critical for remembering
The circadian rhythm that quietly pulses inside us all, guiding our daily cycle from sleep to wakefulness and back to sleep again, may be doing much more than just that simple metronomic task, as per Stanford researchers. Working with Siberian hamsters, biologist Norman Ruby has shown that having a functioning circadian system is critical to the hamsters' ability to remember what they have learned. Without it, he said, "They can't remember........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 10/8/2008 9:39:09 PM)


Proteins in sperm unlock understanding infertility

Proteins in sperm unlock understanding infertility
Proteins found in sperm are central to understanding male infertility and could be used to determine new diagnostic methods and fertility therapys as per a paper published by the journal Molecular and Cellular Proteomics (MCP). The article demonstrates how proteomics, a relatively new field focusing on the function of proteins in a cell, can be successfully applied to infertility, helping identify which proteins in sperm cells are........Go to the Research news blog (Added on 10/8/2008 9:36:08 PM)


Atomic-resolution views suggest function of enzyme

Atomic-resolution views suggest function of enzyme
An atomic-resolution view of an enzyme found only in the eye has given scientists at the University of Washington (UW) clues about how this enzyme, essential to vision, is activated. The enzyme, phosphodiesterase 6 (PDE6), is central to the way light entering the retina is converted into a cascade of signals to the brain. This particular form of the enzyme comes from the cone photoreceptors of the retina and has not been well-researched, in........Go to the Ophthalmology news blog (Added on 10/7/2008 10:50:28 PM)


Novel Lung Cancer Vaccine Trial Launched

Novel Lung Cancer Vaccine Trial Launched
Oncologists at the Moores Cancer Center at the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) in La Jolla are hoping to stave off the relentless march of advanced lung cancer by treating patients with a novel kind of cancer vaccine. While a number of vaccines attempt to pump up the immune system to fight off a cancer, the new vaccine, Lucanix, is genetically engineered to also trick the cancer into turning off its immune system-suppressing........Go to the Lung-cancer-blog (Added on 10/7/2008 10:18:34 PM)


Compassion meditation to psychological stress

Compassion meditation to psychological stress
Data from a new study suggests that individuals who engage in compassion meditation may benefit by reductions in inflammatory and behavioral responses to stress that have been associated with depression and many medical illnesses. The study's findings are published online at www.sciencedirect.com and in the medical journal Psychoneuroendocrinology "While much attention has been paid to meditation practices that emphasize calming the mind,........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 10/7/2008 10:07:21 PM)


 

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