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Why fish oil is good for you

Why fish oil is good for you
It's good news that we are living longer, but bad news that the longer we live, the better our odds of developing late-onset Alzheimer's disease. A number of Alzheimer's scientists have long touted fish oil, by pill or diet, as an accessible and inexpensive "weapon" that may delay or prevent this debilitating disease. Now, UCLA researchers have confirmed that fish oil is indeed a deterrent against Alzheimer's, and they have identified the........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 12/25/2007 11:07:10 PM)

Protection against chemotherapy cardiotoxicity

Protection against chemotherapy cardiotoxicity
Scientists at the University of Grenoble, in France, have discovered that erythropoietin administration prevents acute cardiotoxic effects induced by doxorubicin and trastuzumab exposures. The research article describing this work entitled Erythropoietin pretreatment protects against acute chemotherapy toxicity in isolated rat hearts will be featured in the January 2008 issue of Experimental Biology and Medicine. Eventhough rare,........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 12/20/2007 9:46:29 PM)

Making hospitals safer from infection

Making hospitals safer from infection
Pittsburgh, Penn. (December 20, 2007) One small water line feeding one hospital faucet alone can house millions of bacteria, said international Legionella expert Janet Stout, Ph.D., urging public health and infection control officers to be proactive against Legionella and other waterborne microbes that contribute to soaring hospital infection rates. Communities of waterborne pathogens, known as biofilm, can line every pipe in every water........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 12/20/2007 9:39:44 PM)

Walking and moderate exercise help prevent dementia

Walking and moderate exercise help prevent dementia
People age 65 and older who regularly walk and get other forms of moderate exercise appear to significantly lower their risk of developing vascular dementia, the second most common form of dementia after Alzheimers disease, as per a research studyreported in the December 19, 2007, online issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The four-year study involved 749 men and women in Italy who were over age 65........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 12/20/2007 5:35:40 AM)

Parents show bias in sibling rivalry

Parents show bias in sibling rivalry
Most parents would hotly deny favouring one child over another but new research suggests they may have little choice in the matter. Biologists studying a unique species of beetle that raises and cares for its young have observed that parents instinctively favour the oldest offspring. The University of Manchester research published in Ecology this month supports the findings of studies carried out on human families but is significant in........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 12/20/2007 5:28:04 AM)

Insurance status linked to cancer outcomes

Insurance status linked to cancer outcomes
A new report from the American Cancer Society finds substantial evidence that lack of adequate health insurance coverage is linked to less access to care and poorer outcomes for cancer patients. The report finds the uninsured are less likely to receive recommended cancer screening tests, are more likely to be diagnosed with later stage disease, and have lower survival rates than those with private insurance for several cancers. The new findings........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 12/20/2007 5:17:23 AM)

More Accurate Radiation Therapy for Expecting Mothers

More Accurate Radiation Therapy for Expecting Mothers
Developing fetuses are extremely sensitive to radiation, which poses an impossible dilemma for expecting mothers in need of screening or therapy for cancer. Now scientists from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute have developed a new set of modeling tools that could enable safer, more accurate, and more effective radiation treatment and nuclear medicine imaging procedures for pregnant women. Radiation is a doubled-edged sword: It holds the........Go to the OBGYN news blog (Added on 12/18/2007 9:58:55 PM)

Maternal grandparents are more involved

Maternal grandparents are more involved
As families gather round for the winter holidays, some faces may be more familiar than others. A recent study shows that the amount of social interaction between extended family members depends on whether people are related through their mother or father. Thomas Pollet and his colleagues at Newcastle University and the University of Antwerp, Belgium, investigated how far maternal grandparents and paternal grandparents will go to maintain........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 12/18/2007 9:52:13 PM)

Colon cancer screenings may not pay off

Colon cancer screenings may not pay off
Even though current guidelines advocate colorectal cancer screenings for those with severe illnesses, they may bring little benefit and may actually pose harm, as per a recent study by Yale School of Medicine scientists reported in the Archives of Internal Medicine. The study offers a new approach for assessing who is likely to benefit from a screening so that screening recommendations can be tailored more effectively to individual patients.........Go to the Colon-cancer-blog (Added on 12/18/2007 8:43:56 PM)

Protecting aging Americans against infectious disease

Protecting aging Americans against infectious disease
Scientists at Oregon Health & Science University have uncovered new information about the bodys immune system in a study that suggests new strategies may be in order for protecting the countrys aging population against disease. The research is reported in the current edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science. The research focused on an important component of the bodys immune system, a certain type of white blood cell........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 12/17/2007 10:17:47 PM)

Toward engineered blood vessels

Toward engineered blood vessels
MIT researchers have found a way to induce cells to form parallel tube-like structures that could one day serve as tiny engineered blood vessels. The scientists observed that they can control the cells' development by growing them on a surface with nano-scale patterning. A paper on the work was posted this month in an online issue of Advanced Materials. Engineered blood vessels could one day be transplanted into tissues such as the........Go to the Research news blog (Added on 12/17/2007 9:05:48 PM)

Social and Financial Implications of Adult ADHD

Social and Financial Implications of Adult ADHD
Mount Laurel, NJ, December 17, 2007 Nationally recognized Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD) authority Russell Barkley, Ph.D., has embarked on a national speaking tour to discuss the symptoms of ADHD in adults and the potentially serious consequences these symptoms may have on the life of an adult living with this disorder. ADHD is believed to affect an estimated 8.1 percent of adults, or 9.2 million adults across the U.S. based........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 12/17/2007 8:50:35 PM)

Green tea may protect brain cells against Parkinson's

Green tea may protect brain cells against Parkinson's
Does the consumption of green tea, widely touted to have beneficial effects on health, also protect brain cells" Authors of a new study being published in the December 15th issue of Biological Psychiatry share new data that indicates this may be the case. The authors investigated the effects of green tea polyphenols, a group of naturally occurring chemical substances found in plants that have antioxidant properties, in an animal model of........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 12/13/2007 10:05:03 PM)

Early treatment stops epilepsy

Early treatment stops epilepsy
Yale School of Medicine researchers have shown for the first time that it is possible to suppress the development of epilepsy in genetically predisposed animalswhich could open the door to treating epilepsy as a preventable disease. According to the study published this month in Epilepsia, early treatment of epilepsy-prone rats with the anti-convulsant medicine ethosuximide before the onset of seizures led to a marked suppression of........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 12/13/2007 9:46:13 PM)

Adapting to pregnancy in human evolution

Adapting to pregnancy in human evolution
The human spine evolved differently in males and females in order to alleviate back pressure from the weight of carrying a baby, as per research spearheaded at The University of Texas at Austin. The lumbar differences are documented for the first time in the Dec. 13 issue of Nature. The scientists believe the adaptation first appeared at least two million years ago, in the early human ancestor Australopithecus. The male-female difference........Go to the OBGYN news blog (Added on 12/13/2007 8:59:03 PM)

Link between women's hormones and mood disorders

Link between women's hormones and mood disorders
Countless movies and TV shows make light of womens so-called moodiness, often jokingly attributing it to their menstrual cycle or, on the other hand, to menopause. In fact, mood disorders are a serious and pervasive health problem, and large-scale population studies have observed women are 1.5 to 3 times more likely to suffer from major depressive disorder than are men. In a newly published study, womens health experts from the University of........Go to the OBGYN news blog (Added on 12/12/2007 9:52:49 PM)

'Retrospective Rubber' Remembers Its Old Identities

'Retrospective Rubber' Remembers Its Old Identities
Scientists at the University of Rochester have developed a shape-memory rubber that may enable applications as diverse as biomedical implants, conformal face-masks, self-sealing sutures, and "smart" labels. The material, described in the journal Advanced Materials, forms a new class of shape-memory polymers, which are materials that can be stretched to a new shape and will stay in that form until heated, at which time they revert to their........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 12/12/2007 9:48:02 PM)

Obesity reduces chances of spontaneous pregnancy

Obesity reduces chances of spontaneous pregnancy
A new study of obesity and the probability of pregnancy has shown that a womans chances of a spontaneous pregnancy steadily decrease the fatter she is. In the first prospective cohort study to examine the relationship between body mass index (BMI) and pregnancy chances in women who have no obvious reasons for infertility but who have spent a year or more trying unsuccessfully to conceive, the study observed that for every BMI unit above 29........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 12/11/2007 10:38:28 PM)

bacteria in cows milk may cause Crohn's disease

bacteria in cows milk may cause Crohn's disease
Crohn's is a condition that affects one in 800 people in the UK and causes chronic intestinal inflammation, leading to pain, bleeding and diarrhoea. The team observed that a bacterium called Mycobacterium paratuberculosis releases a molecule that prevents a type of white blood cell from killing E.coli bacteria found in the body. E.coli is known to be present within Crohn's disease tissue in increased numbers. It is thought that the........Go to the GI news blog (Added on 12/10/2007 10:59:55 PM)

Don't just wear a mouthguard; keep it clean

Don't just wear a mouthguard; keep it clean
Fractured teeth, neck injuries and abrasions in the mouth, also known as sports-related dental injuries, are ever present among athletes. As per the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, sports-related dental injuries account for more than 600,000 emergency room visits each year. One may assume that mouthguards should serve as a preventive measure. In some 200,000 cases annually, mouthguards have been known to avert oral injuries and cut the........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 12/10/2007 10:44:36 PM)

 

Thinking patterns and addiction

Thinking patterns and addiction
Researchers have for the first time identified brain sites that fire up more when people make impulsive decisions. In a study comparing brain activity of sober alcoholics and non-addicted people making financial decisions, the group of sober alcoholics showed significantly more "impulsive" neural activity. The scientists also discovered that a specific gene mutation boosted activity in these brain regions when people made impulsive choices.........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 12/25/2007 11:04:34 PM)

The physiology of champions

The physiology of champions
What could be a greater test of the limits of human physiology than the Olympics" To mark the 2008 games in Beijing, the Journal of Physiology present a special issue focusing on the science behind human athleticism and endurance. This unique collection of original research and in-depth reviews examines the genes that make a champion, the physiology of elite athletes, limits to performance and how they might be overcome. Excess body heat........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 12/20/2007 9:57:55 PM)

Cardiovascular disease death rates decline

Cardiovascular disease death rates decline
Cardiovascular disease (CVD) death rates are declining, but CVD is still the No. 1 cause of death in the United States, and risk factor control remains a challenge for a number of, as per the most recent data from the American Heart Associations Heart Disease and Stroke Statistics 2008 Update. The Update will be available in the Dec. 17 online issue of Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association at........Go to the Heart-watch-blog (Added on 12/20/2007 8:51:40 PM)

Premenstrual symptoms getting on your nerves?

Premenstrual symptoms getting on your nerves?
For some women premenstrual syndrome (PMS) is a minor monthly annoyance, but for others, more severe symptoms seriously disrupt their lives. However despite the number of women affected, science has yet to offer a full explanation or universal therapy. Now intriguing new findings reported in the online open access journal BioPsychoSocial Medicine suggest not only that PMS is tied to decreased nerve activity each month, but also that those with........Go to the OBGYN news blog (Added on 12/20/2007 5:32:42 AM)

Domestic violence as stressor associated with smoking

Domestic violence as stressor associated with smoking
Using a large population survey in India, a new study from Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) scientists has found an association between domestic violence and adult smoking. The study appears in the December 11, 2007 issue of the journal Tobacco Control. Smoking and chewing tobacco contribute to some 800,000 deaths in India every year. The smoking rate for Indian men is around 29%, for women, approximately 3%. The rate of tobacco........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 12/20/2007 5:25:42 AM)

Breakthrough in rapid malaria detection

Breakthrough in rapid malaria detection
A research team led by Dr. Paul Wiseman of the Departments of Physics and Chemistry at McGill University has developed a radically new technique that uses lasers and non-linear optical effects to detect malaria infection in human blood, as per a research studyreported in the Biophysical Journal. The scientists say the new technique holds the promise of simpler, faster and far less labour-intensive detection of the malaria parasite in blood........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 12/20/2007 5:15:25 AM)

Providing chronic fatigue syndrome answers

Providing chronic fatigue syndrome answers
One of the most difficult things for people suffering from Chronic Fatigue Syndrome (CFS) is that a number of believe the condition to be a psychological, not physical affliction. New research by the Faculty of Kinesiology hopes to measure one of the syndromes most obvious symptoms information that could help doctors in the diagnosis CFS. Diagnosis of the syndrome, generally follows eliminating every other possible cause, which leads........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 12/18/2007 10:14:39 PM)

Health care in American prisons

Health care in American prisons?
That question is addressed in a special issue of Journal of Correctional Health Care (JCHC), opening up correctional system health care issues to outside evaluation and input. In key articles and commentaries, all written by eminent experts and pioneers in the field, JCHC explores the history of prison health care, from when the only option was for inmates to provide basic first aid for each other, to the current realities of clinics and........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 12/18/2007 9:22:04 PM)

How Doctors Deal With The Risks

How Doctors Deal With The Risks
Risk is an inherent element of the hospital system and the resulting dangers are often normalised by medical staff to allow them to do their job, as per research by a University of Nottingham academic. Dr Justin Waring, Lecturer in Medical Sociology and Health Policy at the University, observed that medical staff were inevitably pessimistic about the ability of their management team to understand the level of risk that doctors and nurses........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 12/17/2007 10:32:05 PM)

The science of shivering

The science of shivering
Scientists at Oregon Health & Science Universitys Neurological Sciences Institute have uncovered the system that tells the body when to perform one of its most basic defenses against the cold: shivering. The researchers have discovered the brains wiring system, which takes temperature information from the skin and determines when a person should start shivering. Their findings appear in the advance online edition of the journal Nature........Go to the Research news blog (Added on 12/17/2007 10:23:12 PM)

Underuse of colorectal cancer screening

Underuse of colorectal cancer screening
Two recently released studies confirm an alarming reality, that a majority of Americans who should be getting screened for colorectal cancer are not. Men and women over the age of 50 should be screened for colorectal cancer, but as per a research studyin the journal Cancer, scientists observed that among an assessment of Medicare beneficiaries between 1998 and 2004, only 25.4 percent of people were screened, despite Medicare coverage for........Go to the Colon-cancer-blog (Added on 12/17/2007 9:30:22 PM)

Effective new treatment for schizophrenia

Effective new treatment for schizophrenia
Schizophrenia is one of the most debilitating of the major psychiatric disorders, and is also one of the most difficult to treat. Eventhough numerous antipsychotic therapys are available, they can cause significant side effects and a number of patients experience only a partial relief of their symptoms and up to 30% no relief at all. In a new study scheduled for publication in the December 15th issue of Biological Psychiatry, Marder and his........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 12/13/2007 10:06:47 PM)

Why vaccines directed against cancer don't work

Why vaccines directed against cancer don't work
Scientists from the University of Missouri and Imperial College London have found evidence suggesting why vaccines directed against the virus that causes AIDS and a number of cancers do not work. This research is being reported in the Dec. 14 edition of The Journal of Biological Chemistry. In research spanning more than a decade, Gary Clark, associate professor of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Womens Health in the MU School of Medicine, and........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 12/13/2007 9:53:07 PM)

Overweight People Are More Likely to Have Bad Breath

Overweight People Are More Likely to Have Bad Breath
Now there's another good reason to go on that diet after the holidays. Tel Aviv University scientists have published a study that finds a direct link between obesity and bad breath: the more overweight you are, the more likely your breath will smell unpleasant to those around you. The research, led by breath expert Prof. Mel Rosenberg from the Department of Human Microbiology and The Maurice and Gabriela Goldschleger School of Dental........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 12/13/2007 9:08:27 PM)

Too much fructose could leave dieters sugar shocked

Too much fructose could leave dieters sugar shocked
Heres one tip for how to eat at the holidays: Dont take your cues from Santa. The sugary cookies and fat-laden fruitcakes the mythical North Pole resident eats are a no-no. But you dont have to go no-carb to stay fit at the holidays, either, University of Florida scientists say. In fact, a number of dieters may actually be cutting out the wrong foods altogether, as per findings from a UF paper published recently in the European Journal of........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 12/12/2007 10:14:18 PM)

Greater agreement on the attractiveness of faces

Greater agreement on the attractiveness of faces
A new study from scientists at Harvard University shows that friends, siblings and spouses are more likely than strangers to agree on the attractiveness of faces. Recent research regarding facial attractiveness has emphasized the universality of attractiveness preferences, and in this study there was some agreement among the strangers - but the close relations were in even greater agreement regarding facial attractiveness. The study appears........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 12/12/2007 10:09:30 PM)

The bear necessities of aging

The bear necessities of aging
As per George Bernard Shaw: We dont stop playing because we grow old; we grow old because we stop playing, but how fast does that aging occur once started" In the case of populations of salmon in Alaska studied by Stephanie Carlson and his colleagues at the University of Washington and McGill University and reported on in this weeks PLoS ONE, it all depends on how choosy are the bears which feed on them. Pacific salmon are noted for not........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 12/11/2007 10:39:45 PM)

Microbial risks in the water we drink

Microbial risks in the water we drink
It is a familiar scenario experienced around the world: an outbreak of gastrointestinal illness suddenly emerges in a community, and no one knows where it came from or how to stop it. At the start of the outbreak, only a few people are affected, most often the very old and the very young. As the outbreak worsens, more and more people fall ill, and people who were weak or unwell may develop life-threatening complications. Such outbreaks........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 12/11/2007 10:11:01 PM)

First-line therapy for multiple myeloma

First-line therapy for multiple myeloma
A new combination of bortezomib (Velcade) and two other drugs is showing a very high response rate in patients newly diagnosed with multiple myeloma, a team headed by Dana-Farber Cancer Institute researchers reported at the annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology. The three-pronged regimen of Velcade, lenalidomide (Revlimid) and dexamethasone referred to as Rev/Vel/Dex has achieved an overall response rate of 98 percent in 42........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 12/11/2007 8:25:10 PM)

Parenting practices don't suffer during divorce

Parenting practices don't suffer during divorce
New research is challenging the notion that parents who divorce necessarily exhibit a diminished capacity to parent in the period following divorce. A large, longitudinal study conducted by University of Alberta sociology professor Lisa Strohschein has observed that divorce does not change parenting behavior, and that there are actually more similarities than differences in parenting between recently divorced and married parents. The study........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 12/10/2007 10:40:56 PM)

 

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Oncologist: Physician or surgeon who had specialized in the treatment of cancer. Medical oncologists usually treat patients with chemotherapy, hormonal therapy and biological therapy, radiation oncologists treat cancer with radiation therapy and surgical oncologists treat patients with surgery. See cancer terms for more cancer related terms.

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