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Cause Of Chronic Dizziness

Cause Of Chronic Dizziness
Approximately 9 million to 15 million people in the U.S. suffer from recurrent bouts of dizziness and 3 million experience symptoms of dizziness nearly every day. As per a paper that appears in the recent issue of Archives of OtolaryngologyHead & Neck Surgery, scientists at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine observed that chronic subjective dizziness (CSD) may have several common causes, including anxiety disorders, migraine,........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 2/20/2007 9:10:27 PM)

Newborns with respiratory distress

Newborns with respiratory distress
Newborns with respiratory distress should be reviewed for primary ciliary dyskinesia, a rare genetic disease that has features similar to cystic fibrosis, says Thomas Ferkol, M.D., from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. He reports finding that about 80 percent of patients with primary ciliary dyskinesia (PCD) have a history of newborn respiratory distress.

"The diagnosis of PCD requires a high index of suspicion, but PCD........Go to the Pediatric news blog (Added on 2/20/2007 7:58:49 PM)

Chemotherapy Drug Packs A One-two Punch

Chemotherapy Drug Packs A One-two Punch
Cancer can be wily, and those who treat the disease have amassed a wide array of weapons with which to fight it and kill tumors. Radiation treatment and various forms of chemotherapy were all believed to be separate but equal therapys. Now, however, new research is beginning to show that it's not just killing the cancer cells that matter. How they're killed may turn out to be just as important and could play a role in marshalling the body's........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 2/20/2007 7:51:55 PM)

Sometimes People Can Be Trusted

Sometimes People Can Be Trusted
Government ownership is not always the best way to protect natural resources, said Elinor Ostrom, director of the Workshop in Political Theory and Policy Analysis at Indiana University.

In a presentation given on Saturday (Feb. 17) at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, she described a diagnostic framework to help policymakers develop sustainability plans for each unique resource. Contradicting the........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 2/19/2007 8:33:53 PM)

Those Who Once Were Blind Can Learn To See

Those Who Once Were Blind Can Learn To See
How does the human brain "learn" to see? If the brain is deprived of visual input early in life, can it later learn to see at all?

MIT scientists are exploring those questions by studying some unique patients--people who were born blind, or blinded very young, and later had their sight restored.

Doctors have long believed that children who were blind during a "critical period" early in life had little hope of learning how to see even if........Go to the Ophthalmology news blog (Added on 2/19/2007 8:11:39 PM)

Alzheimers Research Initiated At UCSB

Alzheimers Research Initiated At UCSB
Michael Bowers, a professor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, developed this project, which is being funded by the National Institutes of Health. Bowerss laboratory will receive $1.3 million of the total $9 million project grant, plus biological samples worth an additional $500,000. The grant covers a five-year period. Four institutions are involved.

Bowers is using specialized chemical research methods and applying them to........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 2/15/2007 7:11:42 AM)

African-american Breast Cancer Survivors And Perceived Risk

African-american Breast Cancer Survivors And Perceived Risk
A unique survey of African American breast cancer survivors at heightened risk for hereditary breast cancer has found the majority do not believe they have an increased chance of developing the cancer again.

Scientists from the University of Pennsylvania, reporting in the recent issue of Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, say these findings suggest it is important to ensure that African American women understand their risk of........Go to the Breast-cancer-blog (Added on 2/15/2007 4:31:24 AM)

Be careful with garlic treatment for children

Be careful with garlic treatment for children
Parents and practitioners should know more about garlic before using it to treat children, as per a review of data conducted in part by the University of Alberta.

While using garlic to treat children for various ailments appears to be generally safe, more research needs to be done on its specific effects, and garlic is not recommended in at least one therapy, scientists found after reviewing several studies that used the plant to treat........Go to the Pediatric news blog (Added on 2/13/2007 9:17:01 PM)

Migration Played Key Role in HIV Spread

Migration Played Key Role in HIV Spread
Labor migration played a critical role in the spread of HIV in South Africa, as per new research reported in the journal AIDS.

Using data collected from nearly 500 men and women living in bustling towns and rural villages, scientists from Brown University, Harvard Medical School and Imperial College London created a mathematical model that shows that migration of South African workers played a major role in the spread of HIV mainly by........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 2/13/2007 8:36:15 PM)

Walkable Communities Make Elders Healthier

Walkable Communities Make Elders Healthier
Some of a neighborhood's features -- the length of its blocks, how a number of grocery stores or restaurants are nearby -- may be more than selling points for real estate agents. A new study suggests such factors may work to beat back obesity in older people by increasing a neighborhood's "walkability."

The findings by University of Washington and Group Health Cooperative scientists involved more than 900 elderly Group Health members living........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 2/12/2007 9:50:14 PM)

More than meets the tongue

More than meets the tongue
Does orange juice taste sweeter if it's a brighter orange? A new study in the recent issue of the Journal of Consumer Research finds that the color of a drink can influence how we think it tastes. In fact, the scientists observed that color was more of an influence on how taste waccording toceived than quality or price information.

"Perceptual discrimination is fundamental to rational choice in a number of product categories yet rarely........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 2/12/2007 9:40:08 PM)

Protecting Women's Mood Under Stress

Protecting Women's Mood Under Stress
German scientists have found additional evidence that the stress hormone cortisol can have positive effects in certain situations. Eventhough chronic stress, which brings long-term elevations of cortisol in the bloodstream, can weaken the immune system and induce depression, this new study adds to mounting evidence that cortisol given near in time to a physical or psychological stress may lessen the stressor's emotional impact. Psychology........Go to the OBGYN news blog (Added on 2/11/2007 9:28:10 PM)

Technology To Captures Tumors'genetic Profile

Technology To Captures Tumors'genetic Profile
A study led by scientists at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Broad Institute of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University provides the first demonstration of a practical method of screening tumors for cancer-related gene abnormalities that might be treated with "targeted" drugs.

The findings, published online today on the Nature Genetics Web site, may help relieve a bottleneck between scientists' expanding knowledge........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 2/11/2007 9:05:59 PM)

Abortion -- where do we draw the line?

Abortion -- where do we draw the line?
The 40th anniversary in October this year of the passing of the UK Abortion Act is certain to be marked by attempts to reopen the debate about lowering the upper limit for legal terminations. In a special report in this weeks BMJ, journalist Jonathan Gornall examines current arguments for reform.

Any challenge to the upper limit of 24 weeks poses big questions about viability, infant suffering, and the capabilities of neonatal care, writes........Go to the OBGYN news blog (Added on 2/9/2007 4:40:56 AM)

African-American mothers more likely to deliver prematurely

African-American mothers more likely to deliver prematurely
African-American women are three times more likely to deliver babies three to 17 weeks prematurely than Caucasian women, as per a review of Missouri birth statistics by scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis.

In addition, African-American women are more likely to deliver babies prematurely in subsequent pregnancies.

The scientists analyzed data from the Missouri Department of Health's maternally linked........Go to the OBGYN news blog (Added on 2/9/2007 4:23:57 AM)

Lung Cancer Rates Among Female Nonsmokers

Lung Cancer Rates Among Female Nonsmokers
Not all lung cancer is due to a lifetime of smoking cigarettes. Sometimes the diagnosis is a mystery, and the stigma surrounding the disease makes it hard for patients to talk about. Now, scientists at the Stanford University School of Medicine and the Northern California Cancer Center have taken the first steps toward analyzing why people who never smoked get lung cancer.

Their data, would be reported in the Feb. 10 issue of the Journal of........Go to the Lung-cancer-blog (Added on 2/8/2007 10:06:45 PM)

Take More Breaks To Avoid Back Injury

Take More Breaks To Avoid Back Injury
Workers who lift for a living need to take longer or more frequent breaks than they now do to avoid back injury, as per a new study at Ohio State University.

The study also suggests that people who are new on the job need to take breaks even more often than experienced workers, and that the risk of injury is higher at the end of a work shift.

People who took part in the study lifted boxes onto conveyor belts for eight hours, while........Go to the Rheumatology news blog (Added on 2/7/2007 9:02:11 PM)

Double Whammy When It Comes To Body Fat

Double Whammy When It Comes To Body Fat
When it comes to body fat, today's elderly adults face a double whammy, as per new research from Wake Forest University School of Medicine and his colleagues. Up until age 80, elderly adults not only gain fat as they age -- but because of the obesity epidemic -- they actually begin their older years fatter.

The result is an increased risk of diabetes, heart disease, high blood pressure, arthritis and disability, as per Jingzhong Ding, M.D.,........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 2/7/2007 5:04:35 AM)

speed up radiation therapy

speed up radiation therapy
A new computer-based technique could eliminate hours of manual adjustment linked to a popular cancer therapy. In a paper reported in the Feb. 7 issue of Physics in Medicine and Biology, scientists from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center describe an approach that has the potential to automatically determine acceptable radiation plans in a matter of minutes, without compromising the quality of therapy.
........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 2/7/2007 4:50:44 AM)

AIDS vaccines demonstrate potential to protect

AIDS vaccines demonstrate potential to protect
GeoVax Labs, Inc, an Atlanta-based biotechnology company, today reported successful results from a preclinical trial using GeoVax's vaccines for the therapeutic therapy and prevention of Acquired Immunodeficiency Disease Syndrome ("AIDS") in non-human primates. The data demonstrate the effectiveness of GeoVax's DNA/MVA vaccines in controlling the Simian ("SIV") AIDS virus through immune responses raised by the vaccines. These promising........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 2/6/2007 9:46:24 PM)

 

Tracking Personality Traits to Learn More About Alcoholism

Tracking Personality Traits to Learn More About Alcoholism
A long-term research project at the University of Missouri-Columbia is producing valuable information about alcoholism and individuals who are affected by a family history of the disease. MU psychology researchers, now several years into a multi-year study, have discovered that individuals from alcoholic homes maintain personality traits that could eventually lead to alcohol dependency.

Kenneth J. Sher, professor of clinical psychology in........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 2/20/2007 8:04:33 PM)

Mental And Physical Health Of Caregivers

Mental And Physical Health Of Caregivers
Having positive cultural beliefs about caring for elders and strong religious beliefs can ward off depression and other mental health difficulties for female caregivers of spouses and parents with dementia, but sustained elevated levels of the stress hormone, cortisol, puts these women at risk for physical health problems, as per a research studyreported in the American Journal of Geriatric Psychology.

"Caregiving for someone with dementia........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 2/20/2007 7:54:21 PM)

Test Identifies Lymphoma Patients Likely to Respond

Test Identifies Lymphoma Patients Likely to Respond
Scientists at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University have discovered a genetic signature identifying cases of lymphoma that are uniquely susceptible to a newly developed molecular targeted treatment. As a result, physicians organizing clinical trials of the new treatment will be able to enroll patients who'll be most likely to benefit from it.

The research was led by Dr. Ari Melnick, assistant professor of........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 2/20/2007 7:47:39 PM)

New test for most virulent HPV strains

New test for most virulent HPV strains
A test for the two strains of human papillomavirus responsible for most cervical cancers is under study.

The molecular assay uses a cervical scraping, like that for a liquid-based Pap smear, to test for HPV types 16 and 18, responsible for 70 percent of cervical cancers, says Dr. Daron G. Ferris, family medicine doctor and director of the Gynecologic Cancer Prevention Center at the Medical College of Georgia.

"Data from a National Cancer........Go to the Cervical cancer blog (Added on 2/19/2007 9:05:32 PM)

HIV protein to kill cancer cells

HIV protein to kill cancer cells
Cancer cells are sick, but they keep growing because they don't react to internal signals urging them to die. Now scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have found an efficient way to get a messenger into cancer cells that forces them to respond to death signals. And they did it using one of the most sinister pathogens around - HIV.

"HIV knows how to insert itself into a number of different types of cells," says........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 2/19/2007 8:07:15 PM)

Low-pitch Treatment For Tinnitus

Low-pitch Treatment For Tinnitus
For those who pumped up the volume one too a number of times, UC Irvine scientists may have found a therapy for the hearing damage loud music can cause.

Fan-Gang Zeng and his colleagues have identified an effective way to treat the symptoms of tinnitus, a form of hearing damage typically marked by high-pitched ringing that torments more than 60 million Americans. A low-pitched sound, the scientists discovered, applied by a simple MP3 player........Go to the ENT news blog (Added on 2/15/2007 6:28:02 AM)

Flu shot might protect against H5N1

Flu shot might protect against H5N1
The yearly influenza vaccine that health officials urge people to get each fall might also offer certain individuals some cross protection against the H5N1 virus, usually known as bird flu, as per researchers at St. Jude Children's Research Hospital.

The researchers observed that a protein present in the annual influenza shot can act as a vaccine itself and trigger some cross protection against H5N1 in mice; and that some human volunteers........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 2/13/2007 9:51:48 PM)

Genetic Testing Of Degenerative Eye Disease

Genetic Testing Of Degenerative Eye Disease
ANN ARBOR, Mich. Genetic testing for eye disease is providing vital information about complex retinal diseases, particularly when used to confirm a clinicians diagnosis.

In a newly published review of such tests that were conducted over a five-year period at the University of Michigan Kellogg Eye Center, researchers were able to confirm a clinicians diagnosis in half of the cases. The testing took place in the laboratory of Radha Ayyagari,........Go to the Ophthalmology news blog (Added on 2/13/2007 8:48:07 PM)

Patients And Therapists Are 'Wired To Connect'

Patients And Therapists Are 'Wired To Connect'
Empathy is well known to be an important component of the patient-therapist relationship, and a new study has revealed the biology behind how patients and therapists connect during a clinical encounter. In the February Journal of Nervous and Mental Diseases, scientists from Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) report the first physiologic evidence of shared emotions underlying the experience of empathy during live psychotherapy sessions. The........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 2/13/2007 8:41:26 PM)

Protein targets antibiotic-resistant bacteria

Protein targets antibiotic-resistant bacteria
A new type of protein discovered by Queens University scientists may be useful in developing therapys for antibiotic-resistant bacteria, such as those that cause food poisoning and typhoid.

By solving the structure and activity of the protein called YihE or RdoA a team of professors and students from the departments of Biochemistry and Microbiology & Immunology has opened up possibilities for new drug development.

Our group is the........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 2/13/2007 7:51:09 PM)

Whose tastes do you trust more?

Whose tastes do you trust more?
Whose tastes do you trust more? The person who loves the same things you love? Or the person who hates the same things you hate? Turns out, when were looking for advice, positivity reigns. A new study reveals that we trust those who love the same things we love more than those who hate the same things we hate. As the scientists explain in the recent issue of the Journal of Consumer Research, "There are few ways that products are loved, but a........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 2/12/2007 9:43:26 PM)

Be around friends to impair your memory

Be around friends to impair your memory
Youre watching a basketball game with some buddies and decide to order pizza during the commercial. Scientists from Indiana University observed that people in a group setting exposed to brand information such as an ad for Pizza Hut -- have a hard time recalling the brands competitors. In other words, being around friends when deciding where to order takeout might cause you to forget completely about that local pizza place youve been wanting to........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 2/12/2007 9:11:53 PM)

New smear test policy puts young women at risk

New smear test policy puts young women at risk
Last month, the BMJ reported a fall in the number of young women attending smear tests. Now, two senior doctors warn that a new policy not to screen women aged 20-24 may be a factor in falling coverage and could increase the risk of cancer developing in young women.

Prevalence of carcinoma in situ (a precursor to cancer known as CIN3) has increased in women aged 20-24, write consultants Amanda Herbert and John Smith. This new policy will add........Go to the OBGYN news blog (Added on 2/9/2007 4:46:49 AM)

New Model for Testing and Discovery of Anti-HIV Drugs

New Model for Testing and Discovery of Anti-HIV Drugs
Scientists at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine are the first to show that a mouse protein, whose human equivalent is correlation to defense against HIV-1, inhibits the infection and spread of a mouse tumor virus. The study, which appeared online January 28 in advance of its print publication in Nature, provides a new model for the discovery and evaluation of anti-HIV drugs. HIV-1, like the mouse tumor virus, is a retrovirus........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 2/9/2007 4:33:25 AM)

Benchmark fetal surgery study

Benchmark fetal surgery study
It's one of the biggest controversies in fetal surgery and the cause of heated debate among surgeons and maternal-fetal medicine physicians around the world: What's the best way to treat twin-twin transfusion syndrome (TTTS), one of the most common conditions requiring fetal surgery and the leading cause of mortality in twins?

The benchmark, NIH-funded study on TTTS, conducted at 17 centers in the United States, will be presented February 9........Go to the OBGYN news blog (Added on 2/9/2007 4:25:25 AM)

Better Control Of Hemorrhagic Fever Viruses

Better Control Of Hemorrhagic Fever Viruses
Scientists report discovering the receptor through which a group of life-threatening hemorrhagic fever viruses enter and attack the body's cells, and show that infection can be inhibited by blocking this receptor. The findings, would be published online by the journal Nature on February 7, give a clue to the high lethality of New World arenaviruses, suggest a way of reducing the severity of infection, and point the way toward a sorely needed........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 2/7/2007 9:12:47 PM)

Helping women with PCOS achieve pregnancy

Helping women with PCOS achieve pregnancy
Metformin, a drug used to treat diabetes and once thought to have great promise in overcoming the infertility linked to polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), is less effective than the standard fertility drug therapy, clomiphene, as per scientists from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine and the National Institutes of Health Reproductive Medicine research network. This is the largest, most comprehensive effort yet to compare the two........Go to the OBGYN news blog (Added on 2/7/2007 8:20:43 PM)

Children's perceptions and antisocial behavior

Children's perceptions and antisocial behavior
Children who grow up in antisocial families are more likely to be antisocial themselves. Much of the research into why this is so has focused on parents' behavior. A new study finds that the way children perceive their parents' behavior provides clues as to why children of antisocial parents may grow up to be antisocial.

The study, conducted by scientists at the University of California, Davis, and Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 2/7/2007 5:10:42 AM)

Children who sleep less more likely to be overweight

Children who sleep less more likely to be overweight
Research indicates that getting inadequate sleep has negative effects on children's social and emotional well-being and school performance. Now a Northwestern University study finds it also increases their risk of being overweight.

The study -- conducted in two waves of data collection approximately five years apart -- is the first nationally representative, longitudinal investigation of the relationship between sleep, Body Mass Index (BMI)........Go to the Pediatric news blog (Added on 2/7/2007 5:00:14 AM)

Identifying Breast Cancer in Overweight Women

Identifying Breast Cancer in Overweight Women
Increasing the ability to identify sentinel nodes-the very first lymph nodes that trap cancer cells draining away from a breast lesion site-has a major impact in the therapy and outcome of patients with breast cancer, possibly eliminating the need for unnecessary and painful surgery. Scientists observed that using SPECT/CT imaging aids in sentinel node identification-particularly for overweight or obese women, as per a report in the recent........Go to the Breast-cancer-blog (Added on 2/6/2007 9:59:15 PM)

 

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Cancer terms:
Oncologist: Physician or surgeon who had specialized in the treatment of cancer. Medical oncologists usually treat patients with chemotherapy, hormonal therapy and biological therapy, radiation oncologists treat cancer with radiation therapy and surgical oncologists treat patients with surgery. See cancer terms for more cancer related terms.

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