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Occasional memory loss tied to lower brain volume

Occasional memory loss tied to lower brain volume
People who occasionally forget an appointment or a friend's name may have a loss of brain volume, even though they don't have memory deficits on regular tests of memory or dementia, as per a research studyreported in the October 7, 2008, issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The study involved 500 people age 50 to 85 with no dementia who lived in the Netherlands. Participants were asked about........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 10/6/2008 10:33:01 PM)


Free drug samples carry risks for children

Free drug samples carry risks for children
Cambridge, MA.Free prescription drug samples distributed to children may be unsafe, as per a research studyby physicians from Cambridge Health Alliance and Hasbro Children's Hospital. The national study, the first to look at free drug sample use among children, appears in the October 2008 issue of Pediatrics The authors, who also serve as scientists at Harvard Medical School and the Warren Alpert Medical School of Brown University, observed........Go to the Pediatric news blog (Added on 10/6/2008 10:18:59 PM)


Brain pathway responsible for obesity

Brain pathway responsible for obesity
University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers, for the first time, have found a messaging system in the brain that directly affects food intake and body weight. Published in the Oct. 3, 2008 issue of Cell, the findings--from a study in mice--point to a entirely new approach to treating and preventing obesity in humans. The discovery also offers hope for new ways to treat related disorders, such as type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 10/3/2008 5:26:58 AM)


Breast cancer cells recycle to escape death

Breast cancer cells recycle to escape death
A number of breast cancer cells facing potentially lethal antiestrogen treatment recycle to survive, scientists say. About 70 percent of breast cancer cells have receptors for the hormone estrogen, which acts as a nutrient and stimulates their growth. Patients typically get an antiestrogen such as tamoxifen for five years to try to starve them to death, says Dr. Patricia V. Schoenlein, cancer researcher in the Medical College of Georgia........Go to the Breast-cancer-blog (Added on 10/3/2008 5:18:13 AM)


Musicians use both sides of their brains more frequently

Musicians use both sides of their brains more frequently
Supporting what a number of of us who are not musically talented have often felt, new research reveals that trained musicians really do think differently than the rest of us. Vanderbilt University psychology experts have observed that professionally trained musicians more effectively use a creative technique called divergent thinking, and also use both the left and the right sides of their frontal cortex more heavily than the average person. ........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 10/2/2008 10:31:55 PM)


Acupressure calms children before surgery

Acupressure calms children before surgery
An acupressure therapy applied to children undergoing anesthesia noticeably lowers their anxiety levels and makes the stress of surgery more calming for them and their families, UC Irvine anesthesiologists have learned. As per Dr. Zeev Kain, anesthesiology and perioperative care chair, and his Yale University collaborator Dr. Shu-Ming Wang, this noninvasive, drug-free method is an effective, complementary anxiety-relief treatment for........Go to the Pediatric news blog (Added on 10/2/2008 5:04:27 AM)


Getting help for depression and anxiety

Getting help for depression and anxiety
As per the Mood Disorder Society of Canada, about 1.3 million Canadians suffer from depression. University of Alberta researcher Ian Colman says most people are not getting the type of therapy they need. Colman, an assistant professor from the School of Public Health, and his research team decided to perform a study to see the long term effects of taking antidepressants or anti-anxiety medications. The team studied a group of 200........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 10/1/2008 9:31:58 PM)


PTSD impacts veterans' well-being

PTSD impacts veterans' well-being
Deployed peacekeeping veterans with post traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) have significant impairments in health-related quality of life as per research by Dr. J. Donald Richardson of The University of Western Ontario and his co-investigators. The research, published this month in the Canadian Journal of Psychiatry, found anxiety disorders such as PTSD are linked to impaired emotional well-being, and this applies just as much to peacekeeping........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 10/1/2008 8:23:18 PM)


HIV drug maraviroc effective for drug-resistant patients

HIV drug maraviroc effective for drug-resistant patients
As a number of as one quarter of HIV patients have drug resistance, limiting their therapy options and raising their risk for AIDS and death. Now, maraviroc, the first of a new class of HIV drugs called CCR5 receptor antagonists, has been shown to be effective over 48 weeks for drug-resistant patients with R5 HIV-1, a variation of the virus found in more than half of HIV-infected patients. Results of the two Phase 3 multicenter MOTIVATE........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 10/1/2008 8:16:14 PM)


Birth size is a marker of susceptibility to breast cancer

Birth size is a marker of susceptibility to breast cancer
Birth size, and in particular birth length, correlates with subsequent risk of breast cancer in adulthood, as per a new study published in PLoS Medicine by scientists at the London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine. Associations between birth size, perhaps as a marker of the pre-natal environment, and subsequent breast cancer risk have been identified before, but the findings from epidemiological studies have been inconsistent. In........Go to the Breast-cancer-blog (Added on 9/29/2008 10:37:49 PM)


Hepatitis B exposure and pancreatic cancer

Hepatitis B exposure and pancreatic cancer
HOUSTON - In a first-of-its-kind finding, scientists at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center have discovered that exposure to the hepatitis B virus (HBV) may increase the risk of pancreas cancer. The study, reported in the Oct. 1 edition of the Journal of Clinical Oncology, also suggests that patients with this lethal form of cancer treated with chemotherapy may face danger of reactivation of their HBV. Pancreas cancer is........Go to the Pancreatic cancer blog (Added on 9/29/2008 10:19:01 PM)


Less nicotine to the brain than regular cigarettes?

Less nicotine to the brain than regular cigarettes?
For decades now, cigarette makers have marketed so-called light cigarettes which contain less nicotine than regular smokes with the implication that they are less harmful to smokers' health. A new UCLA study shows, however, that they deliver nearly as much nicotine to the brain. Reporting in the current online edition of the International Journal of Neuropsychopharmacology, UCLA psychiatry professor Dr. Arthur L. Brody and his colleagues........Go to the Lung-cancer-blog (Added on 9/28/2008 9:11:36 PM)


Existing anti-obesity drugs may be effective against flu, hepatitis and HIV

Existing anti-obesity drugs may be effective against flu, hepatitis and HIV
Viruses dramatically increase cellular metabolism, and existing anti-obesity drugs may represent a new way to block these metabolic changes and inhibit viral infection, as per a research studypublished recently in the journal Nature Biotechnology Metabolism refers to all the reactions by which living things break down nutrients to produce energy, along with those by which they rebuild broken-down nutrients into complex molecules (e.g. DNA).........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 9/28/2008 8:44:17 PM)


Continuous glucose monitoring in diabetic pregnant women

Continuous glucose monitoring in diabetic pregnant women
Continuous glucose monitoring as part of antenatal care for women with diabetes improves maternal blood glucose control and lowers birth weight and risk of macrosomia* (excessive birth weight in babies), as per a research studypublished on bmj.com today. During pregnancy it is important that women with diabetes keep their blood glucose under control. If not, there may be an increase in the amount of glucose reaching the baby, which makes the........Go to the OBGYN news blog (Added on 9/25/2008 11:06:27 PM)


Are we spending too much on health?

Are we spending too much on health?
In this poor economic climate and period of lower growth is it time to consider limiting spending on healthcare budgets? Two experts debate the issue on bmj.com today. The key challenge is to get more value for money from the already vast sums of money spent on health services rather than increasing spending, argues Professor Nick Bosanquet from Imperial College, London. In the UK, health care spending is growing 2% points faster than GDP........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 9/25/2008 11:03:31 PM)


Young women with early form of breast cance

Young women withearly form of breast cance
Young women with DCIS, a common form of early breast cancer that arises in and is confined to the mammary ducts, are presumed more likely to have recurrences than older women with the same diagnosis. But a new study from Fox Chase Cancer Center rebuffs this conventional thinking. "There are discrepancies among past studies that looked at the outcomes of very young women with DCIS treated with radiation, but a number of suggested a less........Go to the Breast-cancer-blog (Added on 9/24/2008 9:42:21 PM)


Call for warning labels for energy drinks

Call for warning labels for energy drinks
Johns Hopkins researchers who have spent decades researching the effects of caffeine report that a slew of caffeinated energy drinks now on the market should carry prominent labels that note caffeine doses and warn of potential health risks for consumers. "The caffeine content of energy drinks varies over a 10-fold range, with some containing the equivalent of 14 cans of Coca-Cola, yet the caffeine amounts are often unlabeled and few........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 9/24/2008 9:37:29 PM)


Not a moment to lose in therapy for acute stroke

Not a moment to lose in therapy for acute stroke
In an editorial response to a report in the September 25 issue of the New England Journal (NEJM) on the efficacy of intravenous thrombolysis therapy in the hours after acute ischemic stroke, Patrick Lyden, M.D., professor of neurosciences and director of the UC San Diego Stroke Center, cautions that the study should not be interpreted to mean that such treatment can be withheld for hours or even minutes. "The risk of withholding such therapy........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 9/24/2008 7:04:52 PM)


Balancing the brain

Balancing the brain
Neuroresearchers at Children's Hospital Boston have identified the first known "master switch" in brain cells to orchestrate the formation and maintenance of inhibitory synapses, essential for proper brain function. The factor, called Npas4, regulates more than 200 genes that act in various ways to calm down over-excited cells, restoring a balance that is thought to go askew in some neurologic disorders. The findings are reported in the........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 9/24/2008 6:21:40 PM)


1-week radiation effective breast cancer treatment

1-week radiation effective breast cancer treatment
Boston Accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) using a type of radiation seed implants called balloon brachytherapy, a newer type of radiation therapy that offers more convenience to early-stage patients with breast cancer by shortening radiation treatment from the standard six to seven weeks of therapy to only one week, is as effective in keeping breast cancer from coming back as the standard external beam radiation therapy, as per a........Go to the Breast-cancer-blog (Added on 9/22/2008 10:31:05 PM)


 

Why current publication practices may distort science

Why current publication practices may distort science
The current system of publishing medical and scientific research provides "a distorted view of the reality of scientific data that are generated in the laboratory and clinic," says a team of scientists in this week's PLoS Medicine In their Essay, Neal Young (National Institutes of Health, USA), John Ioannidis (Tufts University School of Medicine, USA and University of Ioannina School of Medicine, Greece), and Omar Al-Ubaydli (George Mason........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 10/6/2008 10:28:14 PM)


Stool DNA testing for colorectal cancer

Stool DNA testing for colorectal cancer
The first generation of a stool DNA test to identify early colorectal cancer has limitations, as per a Mayo Clinic-led study reported in the Oct. 7, 2008, issue of Annals of Internal Medicine Results did not corroborate findings of an earlier multicenter study that showed stool DNA testing was more accurate than fecal blood testing for colorectal cancer detection. *. "But the concerns we identified with stool DNA testing are all solvable,"........Go to the Colon-cancer-blog (Added on 10/6/2008 10:14:55 PM)


Using a fan during sleep associated with lower risk of SIDS

Using a fan during sleep associated with lower risk of SIDS
Fan use appears to be linked to a lower risk of sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) in rooms with inadequate ventilation, as per a report in the recent issue of Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals. The national occurence rate of SIDS decreased 56 percent from 1992 to 2003, as per background information in the article. This decline is largely attributed to the increased use of the supine sleep........Go to the Pediatric news blog (Added on 10/6/2008 10:12:45 PM)


Study examines how doctors discuss medical errors

Study examines how doctors discuss medical errors
We can learn from our mistakes, but how willing are we to talk about them? And what happens when those making mistakes are physicians, who are often expected to be infallible? A new University of Iowa study shows that most general practice doctors in teaching hospitals are willing to discuss their own patient care errors with colleagues, but about one in four do not. At the same time, nearly nine of 10 doctors said that if they wanted to........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 10/3/2008 5:11:08 AM)


Colonoscopy reduces colorectal cancer

Colonoscopy reduces colorectal cancer
Patients who undergo a complete negative colonoscopy have a reduced occurence rate of colorectal cancer, confirms a study published in Clinical Gastroenterology and Hepatology However, in the proximal colon, the incidence reduction of colorectal cancer following complete negative colonoscopy differs in magnitude and timing. The reduction of colorectal cancer is observed in about half of the 14 follow-up years and for the most part occurs after........Go to the Colon-cancer-blog (Added on 10/3/2008 5:09:09 AM)


Culture's role on alcohol and violence

Culture's role on alcohol and violence
Countries with strict social rules and behavioral etiquette such as the United Kingdom may foster drinking cultures characterized by unruly or bad behavior, as per a new report on alcohol and violence released recently by International Center for Alcohol Policies (ICAP). The report lists 11 cultural features that may predict levels of violence such as homicide and spousal abuse. The report, "Alcohol and Violence: Exploring Patterns and........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 10/2/2008 4:59:11 AM)


Television Viewing and Aggression

Television Viewing and Aggression
The effect of media violence on behavior is not only an interesting psychological question but is also a relevant public policy and public health issue. Eventhough a number of studies have been conducted examining the link between violence on TV and aggressive behavior, most of these studies have overlooked several other potentially significant factors, including the dramatic context of the violence and the type of violence depicted as well as........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 10/1/2008 9:30:50 PM)


Breakthrough optical technology to assess colon cancer risk

Breakthrough optical technology to assess colon cancer risk
Scientists at NorthShore University HealthSystem (NorthShore) and Northwestern University have discovered that fiber optic technology can for the very first time effectively measure blood levels in the colonic lining (mucosa) in humans, thus having potential applications for analyzing risk of colon cancer. The study appears in the October 2008 issue of Gastroenterology, the official journal of the American Gastroenterological Association........Go to the Colon-cancer-blog (Added on 10/1/2008 8:25:54 PM)


Genes influence effectiveness of weight-loss drug

Genes influence effectiveness of weight-loss drug
Obese patients with a specific genetic make-up lose more weight when taking the weight loss drug sibutramine and undergoing behavioral treatment in comparison to those without this genetic make-up, reports a new study in Gastroenterology, the official journal of the American Gastroenterological Association (AGA) Institute. The obesity epidemic continues to be an increasingly global problem: an estimated 1.6 billion adults worldwide are........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 10/1/2008 8:40:23 AM)


Pain is not a symptom of arthritis, pain causes arthritis

Pain is not a symptom of arthritis, pain causes arthritis
Pain is more than a symptom of osteoarthritis, it is an inherent and damaging part of the disease itself, as per a research studypublished recently in journal Arthritis and Rheumatism More specifically, the study revealed that pain signals originating in arthritic joints, and the biochemical processing of those signals as they reach the spinal cord, worsen and expand arthritis. In addition, scientists observed that nerve pathways carrying pain........Go to the Rheumatology news blog (Added on 9/29/2008 10:35:41 PM)


Second-hand smoke may trigger nicotine dependence

Second-hand smoke may trigger nicotine dependence
Montreal, September 29, 2008 Parents who smoke cigarettes around their kids in cars and homes beware second-hand smoke may trigger symptoms of nicotine dependence in children. The findings appear in the September edition of the journal Addictive Behaviors in a joint study from nine Canadian institutions. "Increased exposure to second-hand smoke, both in cars and homes, was linked to an increased likelihood of children reporting nicotine........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 9/29/2008 10:31:04 PM)


Supplements no better than placebo in slowing cartilage loss

Supplements no better than placebo in slowing cartilage loss
In a two-year multicenter study led by University of Utah doctors, the dietary supplements glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate performed no better than placebo in slowing the rate of cartilage loss in the knees of osteoarthritis patients. This was an ancillary study concurrently conducted on a subset of the patients who were enrolled in the prospective, randomized GAIT (Glucosamine/chondroitin Arthritis Intervention Trial). The primary........Go to the Rheumatology news blog (Added on 9/29/2008 9:28:19 PM)


Deadly rugby virus spreads in sumo wrestlers

Deadly rugby virus spreads in sumo wrestlers
Rugby players may get more than just the ball out of a scrum herpes virus can cause a skin disease called "scrumpox" and it spreads through physical contact. Scientists have studied the spread of the disease among sumo wrestlers in Japan and have discovered that a new strain of the virus could be even more pathogenic, as per an article reported in the recent issue of the Journal of General Virology "Scrumpox", or herpes gladiatorum, is a........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 9/28/2008 8:47:14 PM)


'Hub' of fear memory formation identified in brain cells

'Hub' of fear memory formation identified in brain cells
A protein mandatory for the earliest steps in embryonic development also plays a key role in solidifying fear memories in the brains of adult animals, researchers have revealed. An apparent "hub" for changes in the connections between brain cells, beta-catenin could be a potential target for drugs to enhance or interfere with memory formation. The results are published online this week and appear in the recent issue of Nature Neuroscience ........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 9/28/2008 8:42:18 PM)


English health care system failing to encourage breastfeeding

English health care system failing to encourage breastfeeding
The English healthcare system is failing to encourage breast feeding and a national strategy to promote breast feeding is urgently needed, say experts on bmj.com today. In the UK, the women most likely to use formula milk are young, white and from low socioeconomic backgrounds, and this has created a major public health and inequalities challenge, write Professor Mary Renfrew from the University of York and Professor David Hall from the........Go to the OBGYN news blog (Added on 9/25/2008 11:04:49 PM)


Prevention and treatment of pancreatic cancer

Prevention and treatment of pancreatic cancer
A number of gastrointestinal tumors, including pancreas cancer, have been shown to overexpress the EGFR. The overexpression of EGFR correlates with rapidly progressive disease and poor prognosis. Targeting EGFR pathway as a potential therapeutic strategy for pancreas cancer has been developed. Erlotinib is a small molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitor that efficiently blocks EGFR. Preliminary results of phase III trial in pancreas cancer revealed........Go to the Pancreatic cancer blog (Added on 9/25/2008 11:01:54 PM)


Age alone should not be used to determine whether to treat prostate cancer

Age alone should not be used to determine whether to treat prostate cancer
Concerns regarding the association of hormone treatment used to treat prostate cancer with cardiovascular disease in some older men may lead doctors to forgo hormone therapy solely on the basis of age. But a new study by physicians at Fox Chase Cancer Center shows that men over age 70 with high-risk prostate cancer lived longer and experienced increases in PSA less frequently when treated with long-term androgen deprivation treatment. The........Go to the Prostate-cancer-blog (Added on 9/24/2008 9:40:25 PM)


American kids most medicated

American kids most medicated
American children are approximately three times more likely to be prescribed psychotropic medicine than children in Europe. A new study published recently in BioMed Central's open access journal Child and Adolescent Psychiatry and Mental Health claims that the differences may be accounted for by regulatory practices and cultural beliefs about the role of medicine in emotional and behavioural problems. Julie Zito led a team of scientists from........Go to the Pediatric news blog (Added on 9/24/2008 6:56:50 PM)


Pollution, everyday allergens, may be sources of laryngitis

Pollution, everyday allergens, may be sources of laryngitis
Everyday exposure to environmental tobacco smoke, allergens, and air pollution may be the root of chronic cases of laryngitis, says new research presented at the 2008 American Academy of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery Foundation (AAO-HNSF) Annual Meeting & OTO EXPO in Chicago, IL. Laryngitis symptoms include hoarseness of the voice, cough, and chronic clearing of the throat. Scientists and physicians generally attribute laryngitis to........Go to the Allergy news blog (Added on 9/22/2008 10:38:21 PM)


Acupuncture reduces side effects of breast cancer treatment

Acupuncture reduces side effects of breast cancer treatment
Boston Acupuncture is as effective and longer-lasting in managing the common debilitating side effects of hot flashes, night sweats, and excessive sweating (vasomotor symptoms) linked to breast cancer therapy and has no therapy side effects in comparison to conventional drug treatment, as per a first-of-its-kind study presented September 24, 2008, at the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology's 50th Annual Meeting in Boston. ........Go to the Breast-cancer-blog (Added on 9/22/2008 10:29:19 PM)


 

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Cancer terms:
Oncologist: Physician or surgeon who had specialized in the treatment of cancer. Medical oncologists usually treat patients with chemotherapy, hormonal therapy and biological therapy, radiation oncologists treat cancer with radiation therapy and surgical oncologists treat patients with surgery. See cancer terms for more cancer related terms.

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