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New clues for treatment of disease that causes accelerated aging

New clues for treatment of disease that causes accelerated aging
There is renewed hope for therapy of a rare genetic condition that causes rapidly accelerated aging and leads to an average life expectancy of 13 years. Researchers studying the genes of two infants who died of mysterious illnesses found the infants had mutations in LMNA, the same gene altered in patients with the premature aging condition progeria. But the infants' unusual mutations caused them to make a number of more bad copies of the........Go to the Research news blog (Added on 5/2/2007 9:56:17 PM)

Google technology to track avian flu spread

Google technology to track avian flu spread
An interactive "supermap" that portrays the mutations and spread of the avian flu around the globe over time should help scientists and policy makers better understand the virus and anticipate further outbreaks, as per a new study involving University of Colorado at Boulder and Ohio State University researchers. The research team used data from the known evolution and spread of the avian flu, known as H5N1, to create a roadmap of viral........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 4/30/2007 8:24:22 PM)

Study shows children less prone to false memories

Study shows children less prone to false memories
In the 1980's, a spate of high profile child abuse convictions gave way to heightened concern about false memory reports given by children. Take, for example, the case of Kelly Michaels, a preschool teacher who was convicted on 115 counts of sexual abuse based on the testimony of 20 of her pupils. After serving seven years of her 47 year sentence, Michaels' conviction was overturned after the techniques used to interview the children were shown........Go to the Pediatric news blog (Added on 4/30/2007 6:58:45 PM)

Pharmaceutical Compounds Found in Fresh Water

Pharmaceutical Compounds Found in Fresh Water
As per a research studyin the May/June 2007 issue of the journal Ground Water, pharmaceuticals are being found in septic tanks and, consequentially, ground water due to incomplete human metabolism and excretion into the waste stream or by disposal of unused medications in the toilet or down the sink. This screening-level study investigated the occurrence of pharmaceuticals in areas receiving waste water from septic tanks located in sand and........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 4/30/2007 6:42:35 PM)

Creating a Molecular Nose

Creating a Molecular Nose
The senses of living organisms function using various mechanisms, among other things utilizing membrane proteins as receptors. Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research and the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry have now succeeded in creating biosensors by incorporating such proteins into artificial structures. The membrane proteins are synthesized in-vitro directly from the genetic information introduced to the cell........Go to the Research news blog (Added on 4/29/2007 7:22:32 PM)

Reducing Salt To Reduced Cardiovascular Disease

Reducing Salt To Reduced Cardiovascular Disease
Reducing sodium intake not only prevents high blood pressure, but also prevents heart disease, as per new clinical trial data from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health. Men and women with pre-high blood pressure who reduced their sodium intake by 25 to 35 percent had a 25 percent lower risk of total cardiovascular disease over the 10 to 15 years after they reduced their sodium intake. "The........Go to the Heart-watch-blog (Added on 4/29/2007 4:52:16 PM)

New hereditary breast cancer gene discovered

New hereditary breast cancer gene discovered
A new hereditary breast cancer gene has been discovered by researchers at the Lundberg Laboratory for Cancer Research and the Plastic Surgery Clinic at the Sahlgrenska Academy in Sweden. The scientists observed that women with a certain hereditary deformity syndrome run a nearly twenty times higher risk of contracting breast cancer than expected. Several research teams around the world have long been searching for new hereditary breast........Go to the Breast-cancer-blog (Added on 4/25/2007 9:41:02 PM)

Short chromosomes put cancer cells in forced rest

Short chromosomes put cancer cells in forced rest
A Johns Hopkins team has stopped in its tracks a form of blood cancer in mice by engineering and inactivating an enzyme, telomerase, thereby shortening the ends of chromosomes, called telomeres. "Normally, when telomeres get critically short, the cell commits suicide as a means of protecting the body," says Carol Greider, Ph.D., the Daniel Nathans chair of molecular biology and genetics at Johns Hopkins. Her study, appearing online this........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 4/25/2007 9:34:44 PM)

Report Calls For More Dairy Foods At School

Report Calls For More Dairy Foods At School
Rosemont, Ill. April 25, 2007 Today, the National Academy of Sciences' Institute of Medicine released a report recommending nutrition standards be established for "competitive" foods in the school environment, such as a la carte cafeteria items, vending machines and school stores. The National Dairy Council (NDC) applauds the overall recommendations outlined in the report, which promote the consumption of nonfat and low-fat dairy products,........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 4/25/2007 9:12:38 PM)

Hot flashes: genes, obesity and alcohol

Hot flashes: genes, obesity and alcohol
A number of women in the menopausal transition experience hot flashes: unpredictable, sometimes disruptive, periods of intense heat in the upper torso, neck and face. Eventhough generations of physicians have prescribed hormones to reduce these symptoms, very little research has focused on the underlying causes of hot flashes. Three new studies explore the role of genes, obesity and alcohol consumption in contributing to - or lessening - the........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 4/24/2007 11:03:58 PM)

Smoking Common During Pregnancy

Smoking Common During Pregnancy
While pregnancy may be considered an effective motivator for smoking cessation, results of a new study by scientists at the Mailman School of Public Health indicate that pregnant U.S. women usually smoke, placing themselves and their unborn children at risk for health and developmental complications. The research also finds a significant association between cigarette use, nicotine dependence, and the presence of mental disorders among pregnant........Go to the OBGYN news blog (Added on 4/24/2007 10:30:46 PM)

Cortex area thinner in youth with Alzheimer's-related gene

Cortex area thinner in youth with Alzheimer's-related gene
A part of the brain first affected by Alzheimers disease is thinner in youth with a risk gene for the disorder, a brain imaging study by scientists at the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), one of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), has found. A thinner entorhinal cortex, a structure in the lower middle part of the brains outer mantle, may render these youth more susceptible to degenerative changes and mental decline during the........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 4/23/2007 11:04:05 PM)

HIV Survivors Prompts New Treatment Studies

HIV Survivors Prompts New Treatment Studies
A number of patients diagnosed with HIV in the 1980s and 1990s have survived and now are entering their golden years. AIDs cases among the over-50 crowd reached 90,000 in 2003, and as per the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, will account for half of all HIV/AIDS cases in the United States by 2015. Consequently, health care providers and social service workers are pioneering new ground to treat the growing number of HIV-positive........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 4/23/2007 9:37:03 PM)

Prostate Cancer Treatments Impact On Quality Of Life

Prostate Cancer Treatments Impact On Quality Of Life
A rigorous, long-term study of quality of life in patients who underwent one of the three most common therapys for prostate cancer observed that each affected men's lives in different ways. The findings provide invaluable information for men with prostate cancer who are facing vital therapy decisions. Scientists studied quality of life in men who either underwent radical prostatectomy, implantation of radioactive seeds in their prostate........Go to the Prostate-cancer-blog (Added on 4/23/2007 5:19:55 PM)

Protein Is Critical To Formation Of Muscles

Protein Is Critical To Formation Of Muscles
Proper formation of the proteins that power heart and skeletal muscle seems to rely on a precise concentration of a "chaperone" protein known as UNC-45, as per a new study. This basic discovery may have important implications for understanding and eventually treating heart failure and muscle wasting elsewhere in the body resulting from burns, brain trauma, diabetes, cancer and the effects of aging, the senior author of the paper said. The........Go to the Research news blog (Added on 4/23/2007 5:14:25 PM)

Monkeys' ability to reflect on their thoughts

Monkeys' ability to reflect on their thoughts
New research from Columbia's Primate Cognition Laboratory has shown for the first time that monkeys could acquire meta-cognitive skills: the ability to reflect about their thoughts and to assess their performance. The study was a collaborative effort between Herbert Terrace, Columbia professor of psychology & psychiatry, and director of its Primate Cognition Laboratory, and two graduate students, Lisa Son now professor of psychology at........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 4/21/2007 8:39:42 AM)

Brain networks strengthened by ion channels

Brain networks strengthened by ion channels
Yale School of Medicine and University of Crete School of Medicine scientists report in Cell April 20 the first evidence of a molecular mechanism that dynamically alters the strength of higher brain network connections. This discovery may help the development of drug therapies for the cognitive deficits of normal aging, and for cognitive changes in schizophrenia, bipolar disorder, or attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). "Our........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 4/21/2007 6:49:44 AM)

Novel transfusion strategy for pediatric patients

Novel transfusion strategy for pediatric patients
In its April 19th, 2007 edition, the New England Journal (NEJM) published an article about the findings of a multi-center randomized clinical trial that compared transfusion strategies for patients in pediatric intensive care units. The study, led by Dr. Jacques Lacroix, a full professor in the Department of Pediatrics at the Universit de Montral and a pediatric intensivist as well as researcher at the CHU Sainte-Justine, a university hospital........Go to the Pediatric news blog (Added on 4/19/2007 7:38:14 PM)

Novel drug for treating leukemia

Novel drug for treating leukemia
Scientists from the Children's Cancer Hospital at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center have observed that a novel targeted treatment effectively treats acute leukemia in animal models by preventing cancer cells from being purged of damaged proteins. In the March online issue of the journal Blood, researchers reported that the new proteasome inhibitor, NPI-0052, not only successfully kills leukemia cells, but also shows........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 4/19/2007 7:34:49 PM)

Insights Into Multiple Sclerosis

Insights Into Multiple Sclerosis
Scientists have developed a way to use three types of microscopic imaging techniques simultaneously to analyze living tissue and learn more about the molecular mechanisms of multiple sclerosis, information that could help lead to earlier detection and new therapys. The combined imaging method is enabling the scientists to study how multiple sclerosis causes an overproduction of "astroglial filaments," which form bundles between critical........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 4/17/2007 10:58:16 PM)

 

risk of exposure to secondhand tobacco smoke

risk of exposure to secondhand tobacco smoke
Tens of thousands of Americans die each year from secondhand tobacco smoke, as per a 2006 report by the U.S. Surgeon General. While the health risks linked to indoor secondhand smoke are well documented, little research has been done on exposure to toxic tobacco fumes outdoors. Now, Stanford University scientists have conducted the first in-depth study on how smoking affects air quality at sidewalk cafs, park benches and other outdoor........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 5/2/2007 9:51:53 PM)

Protecting Infants Against Future Allergies

Protecting Infants Against Future Allergies
Maybe being a fussy housekeeper isn't such a good thing after all. Environmental health researchers at the University of Cincinnati (UC) say they have confirmed what other researchers have only suspected: early-life exposure to certain indoor fungal components (molecules) can help build stronger immune systems, and may protect against future allergies. The UC team observed that infants who were exposed to high levels of indoor fungal........Go to the Allergy news blog (Added on 4/30/2007 8:28:12 PM)

In Case of a Smallpox Outbreak

In Case of a Smallpox Outbreak
In the event of a smallpox outbreak in the United States, how long would it take for a vaccine to start protecting Americans by stimulating an immune response? A new national study led by Saint Louis University School of Medicine will attempt to answer this question. General routine vaccinations for smallpox were stopped in the United States in 1971, and the world was declared free of smallpox in 1980. But because of the recent concern about........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 4/30/2007 7:07:06 PM)

The Tungsten Nevada Leukemia Link

The Tungsten Nevada Leukemia Link
Tungsten began increasing in trees in Fallon, Nev. several years before the town's rise in childhood leukemia cases, as per a new research report. The amount of tungsten in tree rings from Fallon quadrupled between 1990 and 2002, whereas the amount in tree rings from nearby towns remained the same, as per a research team led by Paul R. Sheppard of The University of Arizona's Laboratory of Tree-Ring Research. This is the first study that........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 4/30/2007 6:53:38 PM)

Concealed Intentions In Human Brain

Concealed Intentions In Human Brain
Our secret intentions remain concealed until we put them into action -so we believe. Now scientists have been able to decode these secret intentions from patterns of their brain activity. They let subjects freely and covertly choose between two possible tasks - to either add or subtract two numbers. They were then asked to hold in mind their intention for a while until the relevant numbers were presented on a screen. The scientists were able to........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 4/29/2007 7:15:13 PM)

Study to Assess Bariatric Surgery in Adolescents

Study to Assess Bariatric Surgery in Adolescents
The National Institutes of Health (NIH) today launched an observational study to evaluate the benefits and risks of bariatric surgery in adolescents. Bariatric surgery restricts stomach size and can decrease the amount of calories and nutrients the body absorbs. The Teen Longitudinal Assessment of Bariatric Surgery (LABS) study will help to determine if it is an appropriate therapy option for extremely overweight teens. "The reasons for........Go to the GI news blog (Added on 4/29/2007 4:55:06 PM)

Cortex Area Thinner in Youth with Alzheimer's-Related Gene

Cortex Area Thinner in Youth with Alzheimer's-Related Gene
A part of the brain first affected by Alzheimer's disease (http://www.nia.nih.gov/Alzheimers/) is thinner in youth with a risk gene for the disorder, a brain imaging study by scientists at the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH), one of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), has found. A thinner entorhinal cortex, a structure in the lower middle part of the brain's outer mantle, may render these youth more susceptible to degenerative........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 4/29/2007 4:48:02 PM)

Physician ties to drug industry

Physician ties to drug industry
Despite the potential for conflict of interest, virtually all practicing physicians in the U.S. have some form of relationship with pharmaceutical manufacturers but the nature and extent of those relationships vary, depending on the kind of practice, medical specialty, patient mix, and professional activities, reports a study in the April 26 issue of the New England Journal (NEJM). In the first national survey to gauge the predictors and........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 4/25/2007 9:37:00 PM)

Fixing the 'taste' of diet soda

Fixing the 'taste' of diet soda
University of Illinois scientists Soo-Yeun Lee and Shelly Schmidt are trying to solve a mystery: Why doesn't diet soda taste more like regular soda? Can a well-trained panel of "taste testers" pinpoint the exact problem? And can food researchers do anything to fix it? "If we could make diet soda taste better, it would be a big step in fighting the obesity epidemic," said Shelly Schmidt, a U of I professor of food chemistry. "A number of........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 4/25/2007 9:27:08 PM)

FDA causes unnecessary scare

FDA causes unnecessary scare
The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has caused an unnecessary scare about some pain relievers by adding a warning to drugs that are safe, says Curt Furberg, M.D., Ph.D., from Wake Forest University School of Medicine. At the same time, he says the agency has failed to recognize the harm of a pain reliever that should be taken off the market. "The FDA is adding 'black box' warnings to all prescription and over-the-counter pain........Go to the Rheumatology news blog (Added on 4/24/2007 10:51:08 PM)

Depression may trigger diabetes in older adults

Depression may trigger diabetes in older adults
Chronic depression or depression that worsens over time may cause diabetes in older adults, according to new Northwestern University research. This is the first national study to suggest that depression alone -- and not lifestyle factors like being overweight can trigger Type 2 diabetes in adults 65 and older, a population with a high prevalence of diabetes and depression. The report will be published April 23 in Archives of Internal........Go to the Diabetic news blog (Added on 4/23/2007 11:06:19 PM)

School Environment And Student Aggression

School Environment And Student Aggression
The culture of a school can dampen - or exacerbate - the violent or disruptive tendencies of aggressive young teens, new research indicates. A large-scale study from the University of Illinois observed that while personal traits and peer interactions have the most direct effect on the aggressive behavior of middle school students, the school environment also influences student aggression. The study assessed individual, family and school........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 4/23/2007 9:42:20 PM)

Progress On MS research and care

Progress On MS research and care
'Pediatric Multiple Sclerosis and Related Disorders' has just been published by the International Pediatric MS Study Group as a supplement to the journal Neurology. The Group was founded by the National MS Society (USA) to foster global cooperation in studying and addressing the challenges linked to what is generally thought of as an adult neurological disease when it occurs in a non-adult population. It is estimated that there are at least........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 4/23/2007 5:25:30 PM)

Adjustable chairs reduce shoulder and neck pain

Adjustable chairs reduce shoulder and neck pain
Adjustable-height chairs with ergonomically curved seats can significantly reduce neck and shoulder pain in garment workers, as per a new study in the April 20 issue of Spine. The study shows that chair design affects neck and shoulder pain among garment workers -- and possibly in other laborers engaged in visually intensive manufacturing work, the scientists say. The study was led by David Rempel, MD, MPH, director of the ergonomics........Go to the Rheumatology news blog (Added on 4/23/2007 5:22:56 PM)

Protecting Nerve Fibers In MS

Protecting Nerve Fibers In Ms
Oregon Health & Science University neuroresearchers are eyeing a protein as a potential therapeutic target for multiple sclerosis because de-activating it protects nerve fibers from damage. OHSU researchers, working with colleagues at the Portland Veterans Affairs Medical Center and the University of Padova in Italy, have shown that genetically inactivating a protein called cyclophilin D can protect nerve fibers in a mouse model of multiple........Go to the Research news blog (Added on 4/23/2007 5:16:04 PM)

Benefits Of Remote Monitoring

Benefits Of Remote Monitoring
Scientists from Canada and Australia have observed that the use of remote monitoring for patients with chronic heart failure has the potential to significantly improve clinical outcomes (mortality, morbidity and quality indicators). The use of remote monitoring (telephone support or telemonitoring) to electronically transfer a patients' physiological data such as blood pressure, weight and ECG and oxygen details, to their healthcare provider........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 4/21/2007 8:15:40 AM)

Family turmoil and domestic violence

Family turmoil and domestic violence
Adolescents who are chronically exposed to family turmoil, violence, noise, poor housing or other chronic risk factors show more stress-induced physiological strain on their organs and tissues than other young people. However, when they have responsive, supportive mothers, they do not experience these negative physiological changes, reports a new study from Cornell. But the research group also observed that the cardiovascular systems of........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 4/21/2007 6:44:43 AM)

How Viruses Invade The Brain

How Viruses Invade The Brain
A molecule thought crucial to ferrying the deadly rabies virus into the brain, where it eventually kills, apparently isnt. The surprising finding, say scientists at Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia, may change the way researchers think about how central nervous system-attacking viruses such as herpes viruses invade the brain and cause disease. As per Matthias Schnell, Ph.D., professor of microbiology and immunology at Jefferson........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 4/19/2007 7:42:20 PM)

Smoking indicator of alcohol misuse

Smoking indicator of alcohol misuse
Where there is cigarette smoking there is probably misuse of alcohol too, as per a research studyby Yale School of Medicine scientists in the Archives of Internal Medicine. "This means cigarette smoking status can be used as a clinical indicator for alcohol misuse, which presents an opportunity for intervention," said the principal investigator, Sherry McKee, assistant professor of psychiatry. She said that eventhough brief screening........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 4/18/2007 11:07:01 PM)

Stem cells decrease ischemic injury

Stem cells decrease ischemic injury
This is the impressive result of a study carried out by a group of scientists coordinated by Dr. Maria Grazia De Simoni of the Mario Negri Institute in Milan, Italy in cooperation with the Istituto Neurologico Besta (Milan) and the University of Lausanne. The study appears in the April 18th issue of the international, peer-evaluated, open-access online journal of the Public Library of Science, PLoS ONE. Stroke is the first cause of permanent........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 4/17/2007 11:13:25 PM)

 

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