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Genetic link between mammographic density and breast cancer

Genetic link between mammographic density and breast cancer
A University of Melbourne study has revealed that certain breast cancer genetic variants increase mammographic density, confirming the link between mammographic breast density and breast cancer. Professor John Hopper of the University's School of Population Health says women vary greatly in their underlying risk of breast cancer. "These findings provide an insight into possible new pathways into the development of breast cancer". "We hope........Go to the Breast-cancer-blog (Added on 2/17/2010 7:26:50 AM)


Bowel disease link to blood clots

Bowel disease link to blood clots
People living with Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD) are known to be at high risk of blood clots when admitted to hospital during a flare-up of their disease but now new research by researchers at The University of Nottingham has shown that those who are not admitted to hospital during flare-ups are also at risk. The two main types of IBD are Ulcerative Colitis and Crohn's Disease which affect about one in every 250 people in the UK. The........Go to the GI news blog (Added on 2/11/2010 8:20:05 AM)


Silver Nanoparticles

Silver Nanoparticles
Diamonds and gold may make some hearts flutter on Valentine's Day, but in a University at Buffalo laboratory, silver nanoparticles are being designed to do just the opposite. The nanoparticles are part of a new family of materials being created in the laboratory of SUNY Distinguished Professor and Greatbatch Professor of Advanced Power Sources Esther Takeuchi, PhD, who developed the lithium/silver vanadium oxide battery. The battery was a........Go to the Kidney watch blog (Added on 2/11/2010 8:09:29 AM)


Neuroimaging study may combat Alzheimer's

Neuroimaging study may combat Alzheimer's
Researchers have determined that a new instrument known as PIB-PET is effective in detecting deposits of amyloid-beta protein plaques in the brains of living people, and that these deposits are predictive of who will develop Alzheimer's disease. The finding, the result of a survey of more than 100 studies involving the instrument, including those by the scientists, confirms the sensitivity of the tool, still not commercially available. In........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 2/10/2010 8:17:25 AM)


Racial gaps continue in heart disease

Racial gaps continue in heart disease
Racial gaps exist in women's heart-health awareness, women's knowledge of heart attack warning signs requires attention and nearly half of women report they would not call 9-1-1 if they were having heart attack symptoms, as per new research published in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, a journal of the American Heart Association. Results of the study, commissioned by the American Heart Association, revealed that eventhough........Go to the Heart-watch-blog (Added on 2/10/2010 8:02:32 AM)


Brain area responsible for fear of losing money

Brain area responsible for fear of losing money
Neuroresearchers at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) and their colleagues have tied the human aversion to losing money to a specific structure in the brainthe amygdala. The finding, described in the latest online issue of the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), offers insight into economic behavior, and also into the role of the brain's amygdalae, two almond-shaped clusters of tissue located in the........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 2/9/2010 9:06:49 AM)


Hypertension may predict dementia

Hypertension may predict dementia
Hypertension appears to predict the progression to dementia in elderly adults with impaired executive functions (ability to organize thoughts and make decisions) but not in those with memory dysfunction, as per a report in the recent issue of Archives of Neurology, one of the JAMA/Archives journals. "Eventhough midlife high blood pressure has been confirmed as a risk factor for the development of dementia in late life, there have been........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 2/9/2010 9:04:00 AM)


Stillbirth in women with fibroids

Stillbirth in women with fibroids
In a study to be presented today at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine's (SMFM) annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting , in Chicago, scientists will unveil findings that show that there is an increased risk of intrauterine fetal death (IUFD), usually known as stillbirth, in women who have fibroids. IUFD, or still birth, is rare and affects only six to seven out of every thousand births. The study, conducted by scientists at Washington........Go to the OBGYN news blog (Added on 2/8/2010 8:04:16 AM)


Estrogen-only HRT may increase risk of asthma

Estrogen-only HRT may increase risk of asthma
Oestrogen-only hormone replacement treatment (HRT) may increase the risk of developing asthma after the menopause, suggests a large scale study published ahead of print in the journal Thorax The authors base their findings on 57, 664 women, who were quizzed about their use of HRT and development of asthma symptoms every two years between 1990 and 2002. All the women were taking part in the French E3N study, which includes almost 100, 000........Go to the Allergy news blog (Added on 2/8/2010 7:56:11 AM)


Financial hardship and anxiety

Financial hardship and anxiety
A new analysis has observed that women with medium or low levels of income are especially susceptible to anxiety and depression after being diagnosed with the premalignant breast condition, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS). Published early online in Cancer, a peer-evaluated journal of the American Cancer Society, the study suggests that women with financial hardship appears to benefit from psychosocial interventions that are designed to........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 2/8/2010 7:39:48 AM)


Marijuana ineffective as an Alzheimer's treatment

Marijuana ineffective as an Alzheimer's treatment
The benefits of marijuana in tempering or reversing the effects of Alzheimer's disease have been challenged in a newly released study by scientists at the University of British Columbia and Vancouver Coastal Health Research Institute. The findings, reported in the current issue of the journal Current Alzheimer Research, could lower expectations about the benefits of medical marijuana in combating various cognitive diseases and help redirect........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 2/8/2010 7:34:39 AM)


Killing cancer with nano

Killing cancer with nano
Using lasers and nanoparticles, researchers at Rice University have discovered a new technique for singling out individual diseased cells and destroying them with tiny explosions. The researchers used lasers to make "nanobubbles" by zapping gold nanoparticles inside cells. In tests on cancer cells, they found they could tune the lasers to create either small, bright bubbles that were visible but harmless or large bubbles that burst the cells. ........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 2/5/2010 7:58:53 AM)


High sensitivity to stress isn't always bad

High sensitivity to stress isn't always bad
Children who are particularly reactive to stress are more vulnerable to adversity and have more behavior and health problems than their peers. But a new longitudinal study suggests that highly reactive children are also more likely to do well when they're raised in supportive environments. The study, by researchers at the University of British Columbia, the University of California, San Francisco, and the University of California, Berkeley,........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 2/5/2010 7:48:16 AM)


Electronic health records need better monitoring

Electronic health records need better monitoring
The push is on for healthcare providers to make the switch to electronic health records but it is hard to tell how well these complex health information technology systems are being implemented and used, writes a health informatics researcher at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston in a Feb. 3 commentary in JAMA, The Journal of the American Medical Association. To improve monitoring, Dean Sittig, Ph.D., main author and........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 2/4/2010 8:18:13 AM)


Mother's exposure to bisphenol

Mother's exposure to bisphenol
For years, researchers have warned of the possible negative health effects of bisphenol A, a chemical used to make everything from plastic water bottles and food packaging to sunglasses and CDs. Studies have linked BPA exposure to reproductive disorders, obesity, abnormal brain development as well as breast and prostate cancers, and in January the Food and Drug Administration announced that it was concerned about "the potential effects of BPA........Go to the OBGYN news blog (Added on 2/4/2010 8:11:59 AM)


Waiting for birth or inducing

Waiting for birth or inducing
In a study to be presented today at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine's (SMFM) annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting , in Chicago, scientists will unveil findings that show that waiting for birth is as effective as inducing labor in cases of intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR). Intrauterine growth restriction means that the fetus is substantially smaller than normal. The condition affects about 10% of pregnant women. At birth........Go to the OBGYN news blog (Added on 2/4/2010 7:42:44 AM)


Genes and premature labor

Genes and premature labor
New evidence that genetics play a significant role in some premature births may help explain why a woman can do everything right and still give birth too soon. Research presented today at the 30th Annual Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine (SMFM) meeting ― The Pregnancy Meeting ― showed that the genes of both the mother and the fetus can make them susceptible to an inflammatory response that increases the risk of preterm labor........Go to the OBGYN news blog (Added on 2/4/2010 7:39:03 AM)


Reducing complications of obesity

Reducing complications of obesity
Eventhough obesity is a risk factor for diabetes and coronary heart disease worldwide, only some obese individuals go on to develop these metabolic complications, while others are relatively protected. Defining these protective factors could help researchers prevent disease in the wider population. To this end, a research team at the Gladstone Institute of Cardiovascular Disease, led by Suneil Koliwad, MD, PhD, recently added new details........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 2/3/2010 2:21:53 PM)


How some prostate cancer cells become more aggressive?

How some prostate cancer cells become more aggressive?
Prostate cancer cells are more likely to spread to other parts of the body if a specific gene quits functioning normally, as per new data from scientists at UT Southwestern Medical Center. Certain prostate cancer cells can be held in check by the DAB2IP gene. The gene's product, the DABIP protein, acts as scaffolding that prevents a number of other proteins involved in the progression of prostate cancer cells from over-activation. When those........Go to the Prostate-cancer-blog (Added on 2/3/2010 8:08:54 AM)


Three Brain Diseases Linked to Same Neural Protein

Three Brain Diseases Linked to Same Neural Protein
For the first time, scientists from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine have observed that three different degenerative brain disorders are linked by a toxic form of the same protein. The protein, called Elk-1, was found in clumps of misshaped proteins that are the hallmarks of Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, and Huntington's disease. "These results suggest a molecular link between the presence of inclusions and........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 2/3/2010 7:37:07 AM)


 

What the brain values may not be what it buys

What the brain values may not be what it buys
It's no wonder attractive human faces are everywhere in media and advertising when we see those faces, our brains are constantly computing how much the experiences are worth to us. New brain-imaging research shows it's even possible to predict how much people might be willing to pay for a particular face. Scientists at Duke University Medical Center observed that as participants were watching a sequence of faces, their brains were........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 2/17/2010 7:27:55 AM)


Key interaction that controls telomeres

Key interaction that controls telomeres
In the dominoes that make up human cells, scientists at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center have traced another step of the process that stops cells from becoming malignant. It starts with the enzyme telomerase, which affects the caps, or telomeres, at the end of a chromosome. Telomeres shorten over time. But telomerase prevents this from happening, making the cell immortal. If cancer is triggered in the cell, the presence........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 2/17/2010 7:24:23 AM)


Chronic Illnesses and Acupuncture

Chronic Illnesses and Acupuncture
Doctors at Rush University Medical Center are offering pediatric patients diagnosed with chronic illnesses acupuncture treatment to help ease the pain and negative side effects like nausea, fatigue, and vomiting caused by chronic health conditions and intensive therapys. The confluence of Chinese and Western medicine at Rush Children's Hospital is part of a study to analyze and document how acupuncture might help in reducing pain in children........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 2/10/2010 8:20:08 AM)


When do you explore new things?

When do you explore new things?
A sick or sad child might cling to mom's leg. But that same child fed, rested and generally content will happily toddle off to explore every nook and cranny of the known world. Or: You're chipper and you decide to check out the new restaurant across town. You're blue and you turn to comfort foods. If you've seen or experienced these scenarios, you may not be surprised about the latest finding from an international team of social and........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 2/10/2010 8:15:21 AM)


Depression and lack of concentration

Depression and lack of concentration
A number of clinicians think that depression goes hand in hand with cognitive difficulties such as memory problems or difficulties concentrating and paying attention, but a recent review of nearly 20 years of literature conducted by scientists from UT Southwestern Medical Center has observed that depression does not always lead to such impairments. "The relationship between cognition thinking, attention and memory and depression remains........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 2/10/2010 8:12:58 AM)


Lower detection of prostate cancer with PSA screening in US

Lower detection of prostate cancer with PSA screening in US
Fewer prostate cancers were detected by prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening in the U.S. than in a European randomized trial because of lower screening sensitivity, as per a new brief communication published online February 8 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute To compare the PSA screening performance in a clinical trial with that in a population setting, Elisabeth M. Wever, MSc, Department of Public Health, Erasmus Medical........Go to the Prostate-cancer-blog (Added on 2/9/2010 9:05:41 AM)


Energy Released From a Virus During Infection

Energy Released From a Virus During Infection
Within a virus's tiny exterior is a store of energy waiting to be unleashed. When the virus encounters a host cell, this pent-up energy is released, propelling the viral DNA into the cell and turning it into a virus factory. For the first time, Carnegie Mellon University physicist Alex Evilevitch has directly measured the energy linked to the expulsion of viral DNA, a pivotal discovery toward fully understanding the physical mechanisms that........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 2/8/2010 8:10:26 AM)


Genetic variant linked to biological aging

Genetic variant linked to biological aging
Researchers announced recently (7 Feb) they have identified for the first time definitive variants linked to biological ageing in humans. The team analyzed more than 500,000 genetic variations across the entire human genome to identify the variants which are located near a gene called TERC. The study in Nature Genetics published recently by scientists from the University of Leicester and King's College London, working with University of........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 2/8/2010 7:57:53 AM)


Family meals, adequate sleep and limited TV

Family meals, adequate sleep and limited TV
A new national study suggests that preschool-aged children are likely to have a lower risk for obesity if they regularly engage in one or more of three specific household routines: eating dinner as a family, getting adequate sleep and limiting their weekday television viewing time. In a large sample of the U.S. population, the study showed that 4-year-olds living in homes with all three routines had an almost 40 percent lower prevalence of........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 2/8/2010 7:41:00 AM)


Beer and bone health

Beer and bone health
A newly released study suggests that beer is a significant source of dietary silicon, a key ingredient for increasing bone mineral density. Scientists from the Department of Food Science & Technology at the University of California, Davis studied commercial beer production to determine the relationship between beer production methods and the resulting silicon content, concluding that beer is a rich source of dietary silicon. Details of this........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 2/8/2010 7:38:50 AM)


Soft drink consumption and pancreatic cancer

Soft drink consumption and  pancreatic cancer
Consuming two or more soft drinks per week increased the risk of developing pancreatic cancer by nearly twofold compared to individuals who did not consume soft drinks, according to a report in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. Although relatively rare, pancreatic cancer remains one of the most deadly, and only 5 percent of people who are diagnosed are alive five years........Go to the Pancreatic cancer blog (Added on 2/8/2010 7:37:33 AM)


Possible source of beta cell destruction

Possible source of beta cell destruction
Doctors at Eastern Virginia Medical School's Strelitz Diabetes Center have been stalking the culprit responsible for Type 1 diabetes. Now, they are one step closer. Members of a research team at the center, led by Jerry Nadler, MD, professor and chair of internal medicine and director of the center, have been studying the role of the enzyme 12-Lipoxygenase (12-LO) in the development of Type 1 diabetes. They hope that targeting this enzyme........Go to the Diabetes-watch-blog (Added on 2/5/2010 7:54:14 AM)


Barriers to screening for colorectal cancer

Barriers to screening for colorectal cancer
Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States. Despite evidence and guidelines supporting the value of screening for this disease, rates of screening for colorectal cancer are consistently lower than those for other types of cancer, particularly breast and cervical. Although the screening rates in the target population of adults over age 50, have increased from 20-30 percent in 1997 to nearly 55........Go to the Colon-cancer-blog (Added on 2/5/2010 7:52:40 AM)


Plant derivative may fight cancer

Plant derivative may fight cancer
Medical College of Georgia scientists are seeking to refine cancer therapy with an anti-inflammatory plant derivative long used in Chinese medicine. Celastrol, derived from trees and shrubs called celastracaea, has been used for centuries in China to treat symptoms such as fever, chills, joint pain and inflammation. The MCG scientists think it may also play a role in cancer therapy by inactivating a protein mandatory for cancer growth. ........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 2/4/2010 8:20:06 AM)


Risk of stroke lower for recent Ontario immigrants

Risk of stroke lower for recent Ontario immigrants
Recent immigrants to Ontario have a 30 per cent lower risk of stroke than long term residents, as per preliminary study results from scientists at St. Michael's Hospital and the Institute of Clinical Evaluative Sciences (ICES). "What we learned could translate into long-term health benefits for the whole population," says Dr. Gustavo Saposnik, a neurologist at St. Michael's Hospital. "We need to do further research but the study points to........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 2/4/2010 8:09:51 AM)


Sutures cause fewer complications than staples

Sutures cause fewer complications than staples
In a study to be presented today at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine's (SMFM) annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting , in Chicago, scientists will present findings that there were less complications for women, after having a cesarean delivery, if sutures were used instead of staples to close the wound. When Suzanne Basha, M.D. began her career as an obstetrician/gynecologist, she was surprised to find nothing in the literature that........Go to the OBGYN news blog (Added on 2/4/2010 7:41:49 AM)


Treating depression during pregnancy with acupuncture

Treating depression during pregnancy with acupuncture
In a study to be presented today at the Society for Maternal-Fetal Medicine's (SMFM) annual meeting, The Pregnancy Meeting , in Chicago, scientists will unveil findings that show that acupuncture appears to be an effective therapy for depression during pregnancy. "Depression during pregnancy is an issue of concern because it has negative effects on both the mother and the baby as well as the rest of the family," said Dr. Schnyer, one of the........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 2/4/2010 7:33:19 AM)


Gene variation makes alcoholism less likely in some

Gene variation makes alcoholism less likely in some
Exposure to severe stress early in life increases the risk of alcohol and drug addiction. Yet surprisingly, some adults sexually abused as children - and therefore at high risk for alcohol problems - carry gene variants that protect them from heavy drinking and its effects, as per scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. The researchers, from the university's Midwest Alcoholism Research Center, say the finding........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 2/3/2010 8:14:41 AM)


New weight-loss supplement as good as 20-minute walk

New weight-loss supplement as good as 20-minute walk
A new weight-loss supplement tested by the University of Oklahoma Health and Exercise Science Department has the potential to burn as a number of calories as a 20-minute walk, as per Joel T. Cramer, assistant professor of exercise physiology. Cramer says General Nutrition Centers contracted with OU to test the weight-loss benefits of the nutritional supplement called the tri-pepper blend, which contains black pepper, caffeine and a........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 2/3/2010 8:11:37 AM)


Women should be allowed to eat, drink during labor

Women should be allowed to eat, drink during labor
The traditional practice of restricting food and fluids during labour does not provide any benefits, finds a new review co-authored by a Queen's University Associate Professor. "Based on our review, there is no convincing and existing evidence to support restriction of fluids, and perhaps food, for women during labour. Women should be able to choose for themselves," says Dr. Joan Tranmer of the Queen's School of Nursing. Practitioners........Go to the OBGYN news blog (Added on 2/3/2010 7:59:21 AM)


 

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Cancer terms:
Oncologist: Physician or surgeon who had specialized in the treatment of cancer. Medical oncologists usually treat patients with chemotherapy, hormonal therapy and biological therapy, radiation oncologists treat cancer with radiation therapy and surgical oncologists treat patients with surgery. See cancer terms for more cancer related terms.

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