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Online nutrition courses

Online nutrition courses
Most of us have heard of Phoenix, no, not the mystical bird or the capital of Arizona, but the online university. As per the Babson Survey Research Group, enrollment in online courses is growing faster than overall higher education offerings due to various reasons like the economic downturn. With the increase in demand for online education, a study in the March/April 2011 issue of the Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior explores nine........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 3/8/2011 7:42:12 AM)


Weight-loss surgery successful in adolescents

Weight-loss surgery successful in adolescents
Bariatric surgery refers to several different surgical procedures designed to assist weight loss by limiting the amount of food someone eats or the amount they absorb during digestion. It has been used for several years to treat obesity in adults. A newly released study reported in the journal Clinical Obesity reveals that bariatric surgery can result in significant weight loss in severely obese adolescents. Led by Ange Aikenhead of the........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 3/7/2011 7:21:46 AM)


Gene responsible for severe osteoporosis

Gene responsible for severe osteoporosis
Researchers have identified a single mutated gene that causes Hajdu-Cheney syndrome, a disorder of the bones causing progressive bone loss and osteoporosis (fragile bones). The study, published in Nature Genetics today, gives vital insight into possible causes of osteoporosis and highlights the gene as a potential target for treating the condition. There are only 50 reported cases of Hajdu-Cheney syndrome (HCS), of which severe osteoporosis........Go to the Research news blog (Added on 3/7/2011 7:08:27 AM)


Sleepy connected Americans

Sleepy connected Americans
poll released recently by the National Sleep Foundation (NSF) finds pervasive use of communications technology in the hour before bed. It also finds that a significant number of Americans aren't getting the sleep they say they need and are searching for ways to cope. A number of Americans report dissatisfaction with their sleep during the week. The poll observed that 43% of Americans between the ages of 13 and 64 say they rarely or never........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 3/7/2011 6:53:59 AM)


An overtired medical resident

An overtired medical resident
Recent Accreditation Council for Graduate Medical Education (ACGME) limits aimed to enhance patient safety may compromise the quality of doctors' training, as per a research studyby Mayo Clinic scientists reported in the recent issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings (http://www.mayoclinicproceedings.com). Patient safety has long been a critical concern for hospitals, in particular for those training new doctors. Since 1984, when the death of........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 3/1/2011 10:14:42 PM)


Abstaining Without Thinking About It

Abstaining Without Thinking About It
Alcoholism is a tough addiction to kick. Eventually, most people return to drinking. But some Dutch and German psychological researchers have tested a short-term regime that promises to help alcoholics stay sober. Their study is published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association of Psychological Science. Heavy drinkers tend to behave impulsively in response to temptation. Meanwhile, their "reflective," or controlled,........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 3/1/2011 9:52:29 PM)


Tanning bed exposure can be deadly

Tanning bed exposure can be deadly
Tanning bed exposure can produce more than some tanners may bargain for, particularly when they self-diagnose and use the radiation to treat skin eruptions, as per research conducted by the Indiana University School of Medicine Department of Dermatology. "There are a number of reasons to be cautious of tanning bed radiation but some people use tanning beds to 'self-treat' skin eruptions," said Jeffrey B. Travers, M.D., Ph.D., senior author........Go to the Skin news blog (Added on 3/1/2011 9:25:43 PM)


Steroids to treat asthma: How safe are they?

Steroids to treat asthma: How safe are they?
Children experiencing an asthma attack who are treated with a short burst of oral steroids may have a transient depression of immune response as per a newly released study led by Universit� de Montr�al. These findings, published in this month's issue of Pediatric Allergy, Immunology and Pulmonology, have implications for asthmatic children who have flare-ups and who appears to be exposed to new contagious diseases. "There is no question that........Go to the Allergy news blog (Added on 2/24/2011 7:58:11 AM)


How many mammograms radiologists must read?

How many mammograms radiologists must read?
Radiologists who interpret more mammograms and spend some time reading diagnostic mammograms do better at determining which suspicious breast lesions are cancer, as per a new report published online on February 22 and in print in the recent issue of Radiology In direct response to a report from the Institute of Medicine that called for more research on the relationship between interpretive volume and performance in screening mammography, the........Go to the Breast-cancer-blog (Added on 2/22/2011 7:35:29 AM)


Vaccine made with synthetic gene

Vaccine made with synthetic gene
Scientists at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University have developed an experimental vaccine that appears to protect against an increasingly common and especially deadly form of pneumococcal pneumonia. Details of the new vaccine, which was tested in an animal model, are reported in a paper published recently in the Journal of Infectious Diseases Pneumococcal pneumonia can occur when the lungs are infected with the bacterial........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 2/22/2011 7:32:12 AM)


Callous-unemotional traits

Callous-unemotional traits
Research presented this week at the annual meeting of the American Association for the Advancement of Science highlights the importance of callous-unemotional traits (CU) in identifying children at risk of antisocial behavior and other adjustment problems. The research, presented by Indiana University Bloomington faculty member Nathalie M.G. Fontaine, finds that the emergence of CU traits in childhood is in most cases influenced by genetic........Go to the Pediatric news blog (Added on 2/21/2011 7:43:13 AM)


Higher triglyceride level increases stroke risk

Higher triglyceride level increases stroke risk
A study by scientists in Denmark revealed that increasing levels of non-fasting triglycerides are linked to an increased risk of ischemic stroke in men and women. Higher cholesterol levels were linked to greater stroke risk in men only. Details of this novel, 33-year study are now available online in Annals of Neurology, a journal published by Wiley-Blackwell on behalf of the American Neurological Association. As per the World Health........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 2/21/2011 7:29:31 AM)


New pneumococcal vaccine approach

New pneumococcal vaccine approach
Pneumococcus (Streptococcus pneumoniae) accounts for as much as 11 percent of mortality in young children worldwide. While successful vaccines like Prevnar� exist, they are expensive and only work against specific pneumococcal strains, with the risk of becoming less effective as new strains emerge. Through a novel discovery approach, scientists at Children's Hospital Boston and Genocea Biosciences, Inc., in collaboration with the international........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 2/17/2011 7:16:03 AM)


Regrowing hair

Regrowing hair
It has been long known that stress plays a part not just in the graying of hair but in hair loss as well. Over the years, numerous hair-restoration remedies have emerged, ranging from hucksters' "miracle solvents" to legitimate medications such as minoxidil. But even the best of these have shown limited effectiveness. Now, a team led by scientists from UCLA and the Veterans Administration that was investigating how stress affects........Go to the Skin news blog (Added on 2/17/2011 7:11:54 AM)


Increasing brain enzyme may slow Alzheimer's disease

Increasing brain enzyme may slow  Alzheimer's disease
Increasing puromycin-sensitive aminopeptidase, the most abundant brain peptidase in mammals, slowed the damaging accumulation of tau proteins that are toxic to nerve cells and eventually lead to the neurofibrillary tangles, a major pathological hallmark of Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia, as per a research studypublished online in the journal, Human Molecular Genetics Scientists found they could safely increase the........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 2/17/2011 7:05:33 AM)


Reduced levels of neurotransmitter in MS

Reduced levels of neurotransmitter in MS
Scientists at the University of Illinois at Chicago have demonstrated for the first time that damage to a particular area of the brain and a consequent reduction in noradrenaline are linked to multiple sclerosis. The study is available online in the journal Brain The pathological processes in MS are not well understood, but an important contributor to its progression is the infiltration of white blood cells involved in immune defense........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 2/14/2011 7:39:08 AM)


Compound blocks brain cell destruction in Parkinson's disease

Compound blocks brain cell destruction in Parkinson's disease
Researchers from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have produced the first known compound to show significant effectiveness in protecting brain cells directly affected by Parkinson's disease, a progressive and fatal neurodegenerative disorder. Eventhough the findings were in animal models of the disease, the effectiveness of the compound, combined with its potential to be taken orally, offers the tantalizing possibility of........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 2/14/2011 7:35:15 AM)


Children with ADHD and substance abuse

Children with ADHD and substance abuse
Children with attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder are two to three times more likely than children without the disorder to develop serious substance abuse problems in adolescence and adulthood, as per a research studyby UCLA psychology experts and his colleagues at the University of South Carolina. "This greater risk for children with ADHD applies to boys and girls, it applies across race and ethnicity � the findings were very........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 2/14/2011 7:16:51 AM)


Flavonoids may lower risk of Parkinson's

Flavonoids may lower risk of Parkinson's
New research shows men and women who regularly eat berries may have a lower risk of developing Parkinson's disease, while men may also further lower their risk by regularly eating apples, oranges and other sources rich in dietary components called flavonoids. The study was released recently and will be presented at the American Academy of Neurology's 63rd Annual Meeting in Honolulu April 9 to April 16, 2011. Flavonoids are found in plants........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 2/14/2011 7:07:11 AM)


Obesity and knee arthritis

Obesity and knee arthritis
More than 14 million visits were made to physicians' offices in 2008 by patients with knee problems. Five new studies presented at the 2011 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS) look at the effect that obesity has on knee arthritis and a patient's ability to recover from knee surgery. Does Obesity Cause Irreparable Damage To Knees Despite Weight Loss? (Embargo: February 15) One newly released study........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 2/14/2011 6:55:21 AM)


 

The sorry state of health of US medicine

The sorry state of health of US medicine
As the debate about healthcare in the United States rages, four insightful articles in the March 2011 issue of The American Journal of Medicine strive to add reasoned arguments and empirical research findings to the dialog. The issue leads off with the editorial, "The 800-Pound Gorilla in the Healthcare Living Room," by Journal Editor-in-Chief Dr. Joseph Alpert, Professor of Medicine, Arizona College of Medicine, Tucson. As a practicing........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 3/8/2011 7:40:13 AM)


Stroke patients benefit from family involvement

Stroke patients benefit from family involvement
Your family's involvement in your exercise treatment could significantly improve your function and recovery after stroke, as per a research studyin the March print issue of Stroke: Journal of the American Heart Association. Scientists observed that adding family-assisted exercise treatment to routine physical treatment after stroke improved motor function, balance, distance walked and ability to perform daily living activities. It also........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 3/7/2011 7:22:53 AM)


Protecting the brain from epileptic seizures

Protecting the brain from epileptic seizures
For years brain researchers have puzzled over the shadowy role played by the molecule putrescine, which always seems to be present in the brain following an epileptic seizure, but without a clear indication whether it was there to exacerbate brain damage that follows a seizure or protect the brain from it. A new Brown University study unmasks the molecule as squarely on the side of good: It seems to protect against seizures hours later. ........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 3/7/2011 7:14:36 AM)


13 new genes to heart disease

13 new genes to heart disease
Insight into the complex biological mechanisms that cause heart disease has taken a major step forward with the discovery of 13 new genes that increase the risk of coronary artery disease (CAD). The influence of the majority of the new genes is independent of other established risk factors, suggesting new, unsuspected causes of CAD. The discovery more than doubles the number of genes known to affect the progression of heart disease. The........Go to the Heart-watch-blog (Added on 3/7/2011 7:06:40 AM)


Don't Underestimate the Power of Herbal Teas

Don't Underestimate the Power of Herbal Teas
Those who enjoy the caffeinated lift that comes from drinking traditional coffees and teas may tend to overlook the benefits of drinking herbal infusions. Now, as explained in this month's issue of Agricultural Research magazine, the idea that herbal teas may provide a variety of health benefits is no longer just folklore. U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)-funded researchers in Boston, Mass., have looked into the science-based evidence........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 3/1/2011 10:23:45 PM)


Happiness increases lifespan

Happiness increases lifespan
A review of more than 160 studies of human and animal subjects has found "clear and compelling evidence" that - all else being equal - happy people tend to live longer and experience better health than their unhappy peers. The study, in the journal Applied Psychology: Health and Well-Being, is the most comprehensive review so far of the evidence linking happiness to health outcomes. Its main author, University of Illinois professor emeritus........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 3/1/2011 9:58:53 PM)


HIV vaccine impacts the genetic makeup of the virus

HIV vaccine impacts the genetic makeup of the virus
An AIDS vaccine tested in people, but found to be ineffective, influenced the genetic makeup of the virus that slipped past. The findings suggest new ideas for developing HIV vaccines. The results were published Feb. 27 in Nature Medicine This is the first evidence that vaccine-induced cellular immune responses against HIV-1 infection exert selective pressure on the virus. "Selective pressure" refers to environmental demands that favor........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 3/1/2011 9:28:34 PM)


Cell pathway key to insulin resistance in Type 2 diabetes

Cell pathway key to insulin resistance in Type 2 diabetes
A research team, led by La Jolla Institute scientist Joel Linden, Ph.D., has shed new light on the problem of insulin resistance, and identified the key participants in a molecular pathway that holds therapeutic promise for reducing the severity of type 2 diabetes. The scientists looked at the role of adenosine, an immune system signaling molecule, in triggering inflammation, which significantly contributes to insulin resistance. Insulin........Go to the Diabetic news blog (Added on 2/24/2011 7:54:45 AM)


Using EEGs to diagnose autism

Using EEGs to diagnose autism
A computational physicist and a cognitive neuroscientist at Children's Hospital Boston have come up with the beginnings of a noninvasive test to evaluate an infant's autism risk. It combines the standard electroencephalogram (EEG), which records electrical activity in the brain, with machine-learning algorithms. In a pilot study, their system had 80 percent accuracy in distinguishing between 9-month-old infants known to be at high risk for........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 2/22/2011 7:33:34 AM)


Take care of your brain

Take care of your brain
As the average life span becomes longer, dementia becomes more common. Swedish scientist Laura Fratiglioni has shown that everyone can minimize his or her risk of being affected. Factors from blood pressure and weight to the degree of physical and mental activity can influence cognitive functioning as one gets older. The lengthening of the average life span in the population has caused an increase in the prevalence of aging related........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 2/21/2011 7:45:58 AM)


Relatives of melanoma patients

Relatives of melanoma patients
It is well known that sunbathing increases the risk of skin cancer and that this risk is increased in people with a family history of melanoma. New research published in BioMed Central's open access journal BMC Public Health shows that young people in this 'at risk' group are still ignoring sun safety advice. Professor Sharon Manne at the Centre Cancer Prevention and Control Program, New Jersey, asked over 500 people with a family history of........Go to the Skin news blog (Added on 2/21/2011 7:40:36 AM)


Blood pressure measurement method to revolutionize

Blood pressure measurement method to revolutionize
In a major scientific breakthrough, a new blood pressure measurement device is set to revolutionise the way patients' blood pressure is measured. The new approach, invented by researchers at the University of Leicester and in Singapore, has the potential to enable doctors to treat their patients more effectively because it gives a more accurate reading than the current method used. It does this by measuring the pressure close to the heart �........Go to the Research news blog (Added on 2/21/2011 7:38:51 AM)


Careful cleaning of children's skin wounds key to healing

Careful cleaning of children's skin wounds key to healing
When it comes to curing skin infected with the antibiotic-resistant bacterium MRSA (methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus), timely and proper wound cleaning and draining appears to be more important than the choice of antibiotic, as per a new Johns Hopkins Children's Center study. The work is reported in the recent issue of Pediatrics Scientists originally set out to compare the efficacy of two antibiotics usually used to treat staph........Go to the Skin news blog (Added on 2/21/2011 7:25:04 AM)


Key culprit in breast cancer metastasis

Key culprit in breast cancer metastasis
When doctors discover high concentrations of regulatory T cells in the tumors of patients with breast cancer, the prognosis is often grim, though why exactly has long been unclear. Now new research at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine suggests these regulatory T cells, whose job is to help mediate the body's immune response, produce a protein that appears to hasten and intensify the spread of breast cancer to distant........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 2/17/2011 7:08:19 AM)


Tau-induced memory loss in Alzheimer's mice

Tau-induced memory loss in Alzheimer's mice
Amyloid-beta and tau protein deposits in the brain are characteristic features of Alzheimer disease. The effect on the hippocampus, the area of the brain that plays a central role in learning and memory, is especially severe. However, it appears that the toxic effect of tau protein is largely eliminated when the corresponding tau gene is switched off. Scientists from the Max Planck Research Unit for Structural Molecular Biology at DESY in........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 2/17/2011 7:00:12 AM)


Healthy lifestyle, positive attitude

Healthy lifestyle, positive attitude
Joint replacement patients who improve their lifestyle and maintain a positive mindset previous to surgery are more likely to have better functional outcomes than those who do not, as per research presented today at the 2011 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (AAOS). Multiple studies observed that patients who smoke, misuse alcohol, fail to control blood sugar levels or simply have a poor attitude previous to........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 2/17/2011 6:54:49 AM)


Blood test to detect Alzheimer's disease

Blood test to detect Alzheimer's disease
UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers have helped develop a novel technology to diagnose Alzheimer's disease from blood samples long before symptoms appear. This preliminary technology, which uses synthetic molecules to seek out and identify disease-specific antibodies, also could be used eventually in the development of specific biomarkers for a range of other hard-to-diagnose diseases and conditions, including Parkinson's disease and........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 2/14/2011 7:37:29 AM)


Circulating Tumor Cell Detection

Circulating Tumor Cell Detection
Tiny gold particles can help doctors detect tumor cells circulating in the blood of patients with head and neck cancer, scientists at Emory and Georgia Tech have found. The detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) is an emerging technique that can allow oncologists to monitor patients with cancer for metastasis or to evaluate the progress of their therapy. The gold particles, which are embedded with dyes allowing their detection by laser........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 2/14/2011 7:33:10 AM)


Gonorrhea acquires a piece of human DNA

Gonorrhea acquires a piece of human DNA
If a human cell and a bacterial cell met at a speed-dating event, they would never be expected to exchange phone numbers, much less genetic material. In more scientific terms, a direct transfer of DNA has never been recorded from humans to bacteria. Until now. Northwestern Medicine scientists have discovered the first evidence of a human DNA fragment in a bacterial genome � in this case, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, the bacterium that causes........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 2/14/2011 6:59:25 AM)


Late nights can lead to higher risk of strokes

Late nights can lead to higher risk of strokes
New research from Warwick Medical School published recently in the European Heart Journal shows that prolonged sleep deprivation and disrupted sleep patterns can have long-term, serious health implications. Leading academics from the University have linked lack of sleep to strokes, heart attacks and cardiovascular disorders which often result in early death. Professor Francesco Cappuccio from the University of Warwick Medical School,........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 2/8/2011 6:44:05 AM)


 

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Cancer terms:
Oncologist: Physician or surgeon who had specialized in the treatment of cancer. Medical oncologists usually treat patients with chemotherapy, hormonal therapy and biological therapy, radiation oncologists treat cancer with radiation therapy and surgical oncologists treat patients with surgery. See cancer terms for more cancer related terms.

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