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Floating effective for stress and pain

Floating effective for stress and pain
Relaxation in large, sound- and light-proof tanks with high-salt water floating is an effective way to alleviate long-term stress-related pain. This has been shown by Sven-ke Bood, who recently completed his doctorate in psychology, with a dissertation from Karlstad University in Sweden. The dissertation confirms what earlier studies have indicated: sleep was improved, patients felt more optimistic, and the content of the vitalizing hormone........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 11/5/2007 9:19:32 PM)

Breaking a sweat means less pounds later

Breaking a sweat means less pounds later
Don't slack off on exercise if you want to avoid packing on the pounds as you age. A consistently high level of physical activity from young adulthood into middle age increases the odds of maintaining a stable weight and lessens the amount of weight gained over time, as per a new analysis from Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine. People who reported at least 30 minutes of vigorous activity a day such as jogging,........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 11/5/2007 8:41:55 PM)

Breastfeeding boost IQ in infants

Breastfeeding boost IQ in infants
Breastfeeding boosts infants IQs, but only if the babies have a genetic variant that enhances their metabolism of breast milk, a Yale researcher and collaborators report today in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. It is this genetic variant in FADS2, a gene involved in the control of fatty acid pathways, that may help the children make better use of the breast milk and promote the brain development that is linked to a higher........Go to the Pediatric news blog (Added on 11/5/2007 8:30:56 PM)

Emotional Intelligence and the use of tobacco and cannabis

Emotional Intelligence and the use of tobacco and cannabis
The term Emotional Intelligence could be defined as the capacity to perceive, comprehend and regulate one's own emotions and those of others so as to be able to distinguish between emotions and use this information as a guide for one's thoughts and actions. One of the important benefits of developing this type of intelligence is the ability to learn how to interact with others and to face an ever changing social and cultural world more........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 11/4/2007 9:22:12 PM)

Fountain of youth for your heart?

Study: Fountain of youth for your heart?
An age-related decline in heart function is a risk factor for heart disease in the elderly. While a number of factors contribute to a progressive age-related decline in heart function, alterations in the types of fuels the heart uses to produce energy also play important roles. Jason Dyck and his research team at the University of Alberta have been studying the types of fuels used by the heart in young and aged mice. The young healthy heart........Go to the Heart-watch-blog (Added on 11/4/2007 9:06:57 PM)

Older adults not more distractible

Older adults not more distractible
Despite prior research suggesting that elderly adults are more distractible, new research shows they are no more distractible than younger adults when asked to focus their attention on their sense of sight or sound, or when asked to switch their attention from one sense to the other. The research, performed at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center, focused on the effects of age on multisensory attention, or the way the senses work........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 11/4/2007 8:00:18 PM)

Better, faster heart attack care

Better, faster heart attack care
A North Carolina team of doctors, nurses, hospitals and emergency medical service workers has come up with a way to provide faster, more effective therapy for heart attack patients. It doesnt require expensive drugs or fancy new equipment. But it does require competitors to become collaborators, and it calls on everyone involved to move therapy forward empowering emergency services personnel in the field to diagnose a heart attack,........Go to the Heart-watch-blog (Added on 11/4/2007 2:43:46 PM)

Gene alterations in lung cancer

Gene alterations in lung cancer
An international team of scientists, supported in part by the National Human Genome Research Institute (NHGRI), one of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), today announced that its systematic effort to map the genomic changes underlying lung cancer has uncovered a critical gene alteration not previously associated with any form of cancer. The research, reported in the advance online issue of the journal Nature, also revealed more than 50........Go to the Lung-cancer-blog (Added on 11/4/2007 2:28:20 PM)

Breastfeeding study dispels sagging myth

Breastfeeding study dispels sagging myth
Nursing mothers needn't worry. A new study shows that breastfeeding does not increase breast sagging. University of Kentucky plastic surgeon Dr. Brian Rinker and colleagues conducted the study with patients at UK HealthCare Cosmetic Surgery Associates. The study observed that breastfeeding does not adversely affect breast shape. "A lot of times, if a woman comes in for a breast lift or a breast augmentation, she'll say 'I want to fix what........Go to the OBGYN news blog (Added on 11/1/2007 9:58:39 PM)

Ears ringing?

Ears ringing?
Brain researchers at Johns Hopkins have discovered how cells in the developing ear make their own noise, long before the ear is able to detect sound around them. The finding, reported in this weeks Nature, helps to explain how the developing auditory system generates brain activity in the absence of sound. It also may explain why people sometimes experience tinnitus and hear sounds that seem to come from nowhere. The research team made their........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 10/31/2007 8:46:15 PM)

Avastin Improves Ovarian Cancer Treatment

Avastin Improves Ovarian Cancer Treatment
A new study appearing in International Journal of Gynecological Cancer states that Bevacizumab, a biologic anti-cancer agent that prevents tumor growth by interfering with the formation of new blood vessels, may have the potential to improve the efficacy of standard combination chemotherapy in ovary cancer. Ovary cancer is the fifth most common cancer in women, accounting for nearly 14,000 deaths annually in the United States. Despite the........Go to the Ovarian cancer blog (Added on 10/31/2007 8:10:48 PM)

complementary therapies after heart surgery

complementary therapies after heart surgery
A new Mayo Clinic study shows that massage treatment decreases pain levels for patients after heart surgery. During a five-month period in 2005, 58 patients undergoing surgery participated in a pilot study to examine the effect of massage on pain after surgery. Of the 30 who received massage, the mean pain scores were less than 1 on a scale of 1 to 10, with 10 as the most painful. Before the massage treatment, these patients rated their pain........Go to the Heart-watch-blog (Added on 10/31/2007 7:45:13 PM)

Treadmill training helps Down syndrome babies walk

Treadmill training helps Down syndrome babies walk
Starting Down syndrome infants on treadmill training for just minutes a day can help them walk up to four or five months earlier than with only traditional physical treatment, a new study from the University of Michigan says. The study also suggests that infants who do high intensity treadmill training may walk even sooner. Getting infants walking is critical because so a number of other skills arise from locomotion: social skills, motor........Go to the Pediatric news blog (Added on 10/30/2007 10:23:43 PM)

Technology For Early Detection Of Viruses

Technology For Early Detection Of Viruses
Iowa State University scientists have developed a technology that detects a single molecule of the virus linked to cervical cancer in women. That's a significant improvement over the current test for the human papillomavirus, said Edward Yeung, an Iowa State Distinguished Professor and the Robert Allen Wright Chair in Chemistry who led the research team that developed the new test. The current test, the Nobel Prize-winning polymerase chain........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 10/30/2007 9:51:51 PM)

Can statins make radiation more effective?

Can statins make radiation more effective?
Prostate cancer patients who receive high-dose radiation therapy and also take statin drugs usually used to lower cholesterol have a 10 percent higher chance of being cured of their cancer at 10 years after diagnosis (76 percent), in comparison to those who dont take these medications (66 percent), as per a research studypresented at a scientific session October 31, 2007, at the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncologys 49th........Go to the Prostate-cancer-blog (Added on 10/29/2007 10:33:08 PM)

Smoking increases risk of psoriasis

Smoking increases risk of psoriasis
Another disease can be added to the list of smoking-related disorders -- psoriasis. Scientists have observed that smoking increases the risk of developing psoriasis, heavier smoking increases the risk further, and the risk decreases only slowly after quitting. Investigators from the Massachusetts General Hospital, Brigham and Women's Hospital, the Harvard School of Public Health, all in Boston, USA, and Vancouver General Hospital, Vancouver,........Go to the Skin news blog (Added on 10/29/2007 10:16:15 PM)

What's the brain got to do with education?

What's the brain got to do with education?
Quite a lot - as per teachers in a recent survey commissioned by The Innovation Unit and carried out by scientists at the University of Bristol. Eventhough current teacher training programmes generally omit the science of how we learn, an overwhelming number of the teachers surveyed felt neuroscience could make an important contribution in key educational areas. The research was undertaken to inform a series of seminars between educationalists........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 10/29/2007 9:48:09 PM)

Ten minutes of talking has a mental payoff

Ten minutes of talking has a mental payoff
Spending just 10 minutes talking to another person can help improve your memory and your performance on tests, as per a University of Michigan study would be reported in the February 2008 issue of the Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin. "In our study, socializing was just as effective as more traditional kinds of mental exercise in boosting memory and intellectual performance," said Oscar Ybarra, a psychology expert at the U-M........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 10/29/2007 7:42:37 PM)

Removal of uterus increases risk of urinary incontinence

Removal of uterus increases risk of urinary incontinence
Scientists at the Swedish medical university Karolinska Institutet have shown that hysterectomy - a common operation involving the removal of the uterus - greatly increases the risk of urinary incontinence. Their results, which come from a nationwide study, are presented in The Lancet. Hysterectomy is the most common gynaecological abdominal operation in the world. It is normally performed as a cure for non-malignant medical problems in........Go to the OBGYN news blog (Added on 10/28/2007 4:16:19 PM)

Dealing with Stress as a Treatment for Alcohol Abuse

Dealing with Stress as a Treatment for Alcohol Abuse
A researcher at the University at Buffalo's Research Institute on Addictions (RIA) is initiating a study of "mindfulness-based stress reduction," a technique often used in behavioral medicine for stress reduction but not before as an adjunct in the therapy of alcohol use disorders. "By adapting and applying mindfulness-based stress reduction or MBSR in alcoholism therapy, we hope to develop an increased ability to cope with stress and........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 10/28/2007 3:56:49 PM)

 

Do Women Fare Worse with Some Heart Devices?

Do Women Fare Worse with Some Heart Devices?
While ICDs-implantable cardioverter defibrillators-are the device of choice to manage abnormal heart rhythms, a new study led by heart specialists at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine suggests that women with ICDs fare less well than their male counterparts. In a retrospective analysis to be presented at the AHA Scientific Sessions 2007 on Sunday, November 4 (Poster #C148; 3 p.m.), lead researcher Andrea Russo, M.D., Clinical........Go to the Heart-watch-blog (Added on 11/5/2007 8:56:09 PM)

Environmental stress and cancer

Environmental stress and cancer
One way environmental stress causes cancer is by reducing the activity level of an enzyme that causes cell death, scientists say. They observed that stress-inducing agents, such as oxidative stress, recruit a protein called SENP1 that cuts a regulator called SUMO1 away from the enzyme SIRT1 so its activity level drops, says Dr. Yonghua Yang, postdoctoral fellow in the laboratory of Dr. Kapil Bhalla, director of the MCG Cancer Center. This........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 11/5/2007 8:33:59 PM)

Children with gene show reduced cognitive function

Children with gene show reduced cognitive function
Children who possess a gene known to increase the risk of Alzheimer's disease already show signs of reduced cognitive function, an Oregon Health & Science University study has observed. Researchers in the OHSU School of Medicine discovered that 7- to 10-year-olds with a member of a family of genes implicated in development, nerve cell regeneration and neuroprotection display reduced spatial learning and memory, linked to later-life cognitive........Go to the Pediatric news blog (Added on 11/5/2007 8:23:25 PM)

The need for speed in stroke treatment

The need for speed in stroke treatment
Every 45 seconds, an American suffers a stroke. Every minute one of those individuals goes without therapy, more brain cells die. And every hour that passes before victims get to the hospital, the less likely they are to be eligible for the most effective therapy. But despite all this, 69 percent of stroke victims don¡¯t reach the hospital in the first three hours after their stroke symptoms begin, as per a new study led by the University of........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 11/4/2007 9:18:59 PM)

Scientists question folic acid fortification

Scientists question folic acid fortification
Researchers at the Institute of Food Research have highlighted possible consequences of fortifying flour with folic acid due to new evidence of how it is absorbed by the body. In May, the Food Standards Agency's Board agreed unanimously that 'required fortification' with folic acid should be introduced to make sure the number of babies born with neural tube defects is reduced. This means that it would be compulsory to add folic acid to........Go to the Research news blog (Added on 11/4/2007 8:25:37 PM)

Asymptomatic peripheral artery disease prevalence is rising

Asymptomatic peripheral artery disease prevalence is rising
The prevalence of asymptomatic peripheral artery disease (PAD) is steadily increasing among American adults, scientists reported at the American Heart Associations Scientific Sessions 2007. PAD occurs when fatty deposits accumulate in the inner linings of artery walls, restricting blood flow and needed oxygen to the legs, feet, arms and other areas of the body. PAD increases the risk of dying from heart disease and stroke. We were........Go to the Health news blog (Added on 11/4/2007 8:03:09 PM)

Gene Behind Rheumatoid Arthritis

Gene Behind Rheumatoid Arthritis
University of Manchester scientists have identified a genetic variant in a region on chromosome 6 that is linked to rheumatoid arthritis (RA), the most common inflammatory arthritis affecting 387,000 people in the UK. Professor Jane Worthington and her team at the Arthritis Research Campaign (arc) Epidemiology Unit at the University investigated 9 genetic regions identified earlier this year as potentially harbouring DNA variants determining........Go to the Rheumatology news blog (Added on 11/4/2007 2:34:39 PM)

Radio waves fire up nanotubes embedded in tumors

Radio waves fire up nanotubes embedded in tumors
Cancer cells treated with carbon nanotubes can be destroyed by non-invasive radio waves that heat up the nanotubes while sparing untreated tissue, a research team led by researchers at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center and Rice University has shown in preclinical experiments. In a paper posted online ahead of December publication in the journal Cancer, scientists show that the technique completely destroyed liver cancer........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 11/1/2007 10:08:34 PM)

Red Wine, Fruits And Vegetables May Stop Cancer

Red Wine, Fruits And Vegetables May Stop Cancer
The next cancer drug might come straight from the grocery store, as per new research reported in the November 2007 issue of The FASEB Journal. In the study, French researchers describe how high and low doses of polyphenols have different effects. Most notably, they observed that very high doses of antioxidant polyphenols shut down and prevent malignant tumors by cutting off the formation of new blood vessels needed for tumor growth. Polyphenols........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 11/1/2007 8:37:06 PM)

Are We Programmed to Laugh When Tickled?

Are We Programmed to Laugh When Tickled?
Do we learn to laugh when tickled or is it an innate response? That is the question psychologist Professor Clarence Leuba set himself to examine using his own children, no less, as experimental subjects. In 1933 he decided that he would not laugh in the presence of his first child while tickling him (Leuba, 1941). Everyday life in the Leuba household, therefore, was devoid of tickling except for one special experimental period. During this........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 11/1/2007 7:50:01 PM)

Opium and marijuana research go underground

Opium and marijuana research go underground
The worlds leading expert on the opium poppy has joined forces with scientists working on another infamous drug-producing plant cannabis in hopes of finding new uses for the much-maligned sources of heroin and marijuana. Peter Facchini, professor of Biological Sciences and Canada Research Chair in Plant Biotechnology, has received a $650,000 NSERC Strategic Project Grant to create new varieties of opium poppy and cannabis that can be used........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 10/31/2007 8:22:23 PM)

Can your perspective influence your motivation?

Can your perspective influence your motivation?
Students, athletes and performing artists are often advised to imagine themselves performing successfully. That strategy is believed to motivate them for future exams, games, and shows. But is that motivation influenced by what perspective they take when imagining their performance? Research published by SAGE in the recent issue of Personality and Social Psychology Bulletin explores that question. The three studies explored in the article........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 10/31/2007 7:54:27 PM)

Brain marker for predicting Alzheimer's disease

Brain marker  for predicting Alzheimer's disease
Duke University Medical Center scientists have used imaging technology to identify a new marker that may help identify those at greatest risk for cognitive decline and the development of Alzheimer's disease. The study focused on people with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), a condition that affects an estimated four to five million individuals in the United States. People with MCI are at increased risk for developing Alzheimer's disease in........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 10/30/2007 10:09:27 PM)

Chemical that Triggers Parkinson's Disease

Chemical that Triggers Parkinson's Disease
Scientists at the Saint Louis University School of Medicine have discovered the key brain chemical that causes Parkinson's disease - a breakthrough finding that could pave the way for new, far more effective therapies to treat one of the most common and debilitating neurological disorders. Currently, the main approach for treating Parkinson's disease, which afflicts more than 1.5 million Americans, is to replace dopamine that's lost when the........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 10/30/2007 10:06:08 PM)

New cements to heal spinal fractures

New cements to heal spinal fractures
New research could offer hope for victims of the most devastating spinal injuries - typically those caused in car crashes. Biological cements to repair burst fractures of the spine are being developed and tested in a major new collaborative project between the University of Leeds and Queens University Belfast. The team has been awarded just under 500,000 by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) to develop and examine........Go to the Rheumatology news blog (Added on 10/29/2007 10:28:40 PM)

Radiation seeds effectively cure prostate cancer

Radiation seeds effectively cure prostate cancer
Radiation seed implants (brachytherapy) are just as effective at curing prostate cancer in younger men (aged 60 and younger) as they are in older men, as per a research studypresented at a scientific session on October 31, 2007, at the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncologys 49th Annual Meeting in Los Angeles. Brachytherapy is a minimally invasive procedure where a radiation oncologist places small radioactive seeds into the........Go to the Prostate-cancer-blog (Added on 10/29/2007 10:18:23 PM)

Ethnic Differences in Sleep Quality and Blood Pressure

Ethnic Differences in Sleep Quality and Blood Pressure
In the United States, African Americans have higher blood pressure and are at greater risk of high blood pressure than whites. In addition, African Americans report poorer sleep quality and exhibit a smaller nighttime decrease in blood pressure than whites, a phenomenon called blood pressure "dipping". "This ethnic difference in blood pressure dipping may help explain why African Americans are at greater risk of hypertension," says Dr. Joel........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 10/29/2007 10:10:36 PM)

Epilepsy-induced brain cell damage prevented

Epilepsy-induced brain cell damage prevented
For some epilepsy patients, the side effects of epilepsy can be as troubling as the seizures. One pressing concern is the cognitive impairment seizures often inflict, which potentially includes memory loss, slowed reactions and reduced attention spans. Now researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have directly observed seizure-induced structural changes in brain cells in laboratory animals. They report in The........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 10/29/2007 7:18:06 PM)

Breast cancer in African-American women

Breast cancer in African-American women
African American women are diagnosed with breast cancer at a younger age and have larger tumors and more lymph node involvement than Caucasian women, a Yale School of Medicine researcher reported today. Speaking at the American Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology meeting in Los Angeles, Meena Moran, M.D., assistant professor of therapeutic radiology and Yale Cancer Center member, said her results were based on 2,164 Caucasian........Go to the Breast-cancer-blog (Added on 10/29/2007 7:16:52 PM)

DNA buckyballs for drug delivery

DNA buckyballs for drug delivery
DNA isn't just for storing genetic codes any more. Since DNA can polymerize -- linking a number of molecules together into larger structures -- researchers have been using it as a nanoscale building material, constructing geometric shapes and even working mechanical devices. The term "buckyballs" has been used up to now for tiny spherical assemblies of carbon atoms known as Buckminsterfullerenes or just fullerenes. Under the right........Go to the Research news blog (Added on 10/28/2007 3:13:18 PM)

 

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Cancer terms:
Oncologist: Physician or surgeon who had specialized in the treatment of cancer. Medical oncologists usually treat patients with chemotherapy, hormonal therapy and biological therapy, radiation oncologists treat cancer with radiation therapy and surgical oncologists treat patients with surgery. See cancer terms for more cancer related terms.

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