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One Of 50 Most Influential Women In Optical

One Of 50 Most Influential Women In Optical
P. Sarita Soni, professor of optometry and vice provost for research at Indiana University Bloomington, was named among the 50 most influential women in optical in a report released by Vision Monday magazine, a national news and analysis service for eye care professionals.

Soni joined the School of Optometry in 1978 and has developed and taught many courses in optometry, vision science and optometric technology. She is also the founder and........Go to the Ophthalmology news blog (Added on 7/31/2006 10:58:37 PM)

HIV hides from drugs

HIV hides from drugs
UC Davis scientists have discovered that the human immunodeficiency virus, the virus that causes AIDS, is able to survive efforts to destroy it by hiding out in the mucosal tissues of the intestine. They also observed that HIV continues to replicate in the gut mucosa, suppressing immune function in patients being treated with antiretroviral treatment--even when blood samples from the same individuals indicated the therapy was working. Results........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 7/31/2006 6:56:36 AM)

Diagnosis And Referrals For Kidney Disease

Diagnosis And Referrals For Kidney Disease
Results of a national study of 304 U.S. physicians, in which "mock" patients' symptoms were presented for diagnosis, suggest that a sizeable percentage of primary care doctors probably fail to properly diagnose and refer patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD).

Their findings, published in the recent issue of the American Journal of Kidney Diseases, show that of 126 kidney specialists surveyed, 97 percent properly diagnosed CKD and 99........Go to the Kidney watch blog (Added on 7/31/2006 6:48:31 AM)

Genetic Model For Parkinson's Disease

Genetic Model For Parkinson's Disease
In the mouse model generated by the research team, a gene called TFAM is automatically deleted from the genome in dopamine nerve cells only. Without TFAM, mitochondria cannot function normally. The so called respiratory chain is compromised and energy production decreases severely in the dopamine cells.

The new mice are born healthy from healthy but genetically modified parents and will develop spontaneous disease. Prior studies in the field........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 7/29/2006 8:47:02 PM)

Radiation Cocktail For Breast Cancer

Radiation Cocktail For Breast Cancer
A carefully determined mixture of electron and x-ray beams precisely treated breast tumors while significantly reducing collateral skin damage in 78 patients, scientists will report on August 1 at the annual meeting of the American Association of Physicists in Medicine in Orlando. The key to choosing the right mixture of beams, as well as their individual properties, was a sophisticated computer approach developed by medical physicists........Go to the Breast-cancer-blog (Added on 7/28/2006 10:41:16 PM)

gene therapy for hereditary heart conditions

gene therapy for hereditary heart conditions
A new way of delivering corrective genes with a single injection into a vein holds promise for long-lasting therapys of hereditary diseases of the heart, University of Florida scientists report.

UF scientists used the approach to successfully reverse symptoms in mice with a form of muscular dystrophy that damages the heart. They also tested the virus-based delivery method in monkeys and found genes were readily absorbed by heart muscle........Go to the Heart-watch-blog (Added on 7/28/2006 10:19:56 PM)

Nanotechnology And Atherosclerosis

Nanotechnology And Atherosclerosis
In laboratory tests, one very low dose of a drug was enough to show an effect on notoriously tenacious artery-clogging plaques. What kind of drug is that potent?.

It's not so much the drug itself as how it was delivered. Fumagillin - a drug that can inhibit the growth of new blood vessels that feed atherosclerotic plaques - was sent directly to the base of plaques by microscopically small spheres called nanoparticles developed by scientists........Go to the Heart-watch-blog (Added on 7/28/2006 9:30:53 PM)

Treating Severe Psoriasis

Treating  Severe Psoriasis
NICE's announcement comes as welcome relief to the thousands of UK patients who have exhausted current available therapy options and failed to sustain a long-term benefit. It is a positive sign for patients throughout Europe, whose healthcare systems are influenced by NICE decisions. Leeroy Blake in England was fortunate enough to be offered therapy with a biological treatment, after years of trying every other available psoriasis therapy:........Go to the Skin news blog (Added on 7/26/2006 5:47:09 PM)

Regular Multivitamin Use Near Time Of Conception

Regular Multivitamin Use Near Time Of Conception
Pittsburgh, July 26 Women who are considering becoming pregnant may significantly reduce their risk of developing a common life-threatening complication called preeclampsia by taking a multivitamin supplement regularly three months before conception and during the first trimester of pregnancy. This finding is being reported in a University of Pittsburgh study available online now through an "advance access" feature of the American Journal of........Go to the OBGYN news blog (Added on 7/26/2006 5:42:28 PM)

New Genetic Findings To Understanding Of OCD

New Genetic Findings  To Understanding Of OCD
Obsessive-compulsive disorder tends to run in families, causing members of several generations to experience severe anxiety and disturbing thoughts that they ease by repeating certain behaviors. In fact, close relatives of people with OCD are up to nine times more likely to develop OCD themselves.

Now, new research is shedding new light on one of the genetic factors that may contribute to that pattern. And while no one gene "causes" OCD, the........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 7/26/2006 5:09:32 PM)

New MRI Technique And 3-d Images Of Knees

New MRI Technique And 3-d Images Of Knees
A faster magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data-acquisition technique will cut the time a number of patients spend in a cramped magnetic resonance scanner, yet deliver more precise 3-D images of their bodies.

Developed at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, the faster technique will enable clinics to image more patients - especially the burgeoning group of elderly adults with osteoarthritis-related knee problems - and can help scientists........Go to the Rheumatology news blog (Added on 7/26/2006 4:58:59 PM)

Keeping Babies From Deadly Infections

Keeping Babies From Deadly Infections
The Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday approved a new test studied at the University of Florida that could lead to better screening for the most common cause of infection in newborn babies.

Passed from mother to child during birth, group B streptococcus can cause sepsis, pneumonia, meningitis, neurological damage and, in a small percentage of newborns, even death.

Eventhough all women are tested for group B streptococcus during........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 7/26/2006 4:49:18 PM)

Overweight Teens Reduce Risk Of Diabetes

Overweight Teens Reduce Risk Of Diabetes
Teens at risk of developing diabetes can prevent or delay its onset through strength training exercise, a University of Southern California study has observed.

Research led by Michael Goran, PhD, professor of preventive medicine in the Keck School of Medicine of USC, showed that overweight Latino teenage boys who lifted weights twice per week for 16 weeks significantly reduced their insulin resistance, a condition in which their bodies don't........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 7/25/2006 8:51:34 PM)

Screen New mothers for postpartum depression

Screen New mothers for postpartum depression
Physicians should screen mothers for postpartum depression regularly for at least a year following childbirth to better identify women who develop symptoms throughout the year and those whose depression persists, University of Rochester Medical Center scientists say.

"If you only screen early or if you only screen once, you will miss some," said Linda Chaudron, M.D., an assistant professor of psychiatry, pediatrics and obstetrics and........Go to the OBGYN news blog (Added on 7/25/2006 8:20:53 PM)

Inflammation Disease Link

Inflammation Disease Link
New research at MIT may help researchers better understand the chemical associations between chronic inflammation and diseases such as cancer and atherosclerosis. The work could lead to drugs that break the link between the two.

When an infection occurs, immune cells flock to the area and secrete large amounts of highly reactive chemicals to combat the invader. But, these inflammatory chemicals also attack normal tissue surrounding the........Go to the Research news blog (Added on 7/25/2006 6:48:57 PM)

Family history of breast cancer may be missed

Family history of breast cancer may be missed
Using survey data from April 2003 to March 2005 for Women's Health Clinic patients without breast cancer, scientists observed that while 16% of the participants reported a maternal relative with breast cancer, only 10% reported a paternal relative. Because mothers are much more likely to develop breast cancer than fathers, participants who reported a mother with breast cancer were excluded from the study.

There may be multiple explanations........Go to the Breast-cancer-blog (Added on 7/25/2006 6:21:34 AM)

Obesity an increasing obstacle

Obesity an increasing obstacle
The increase of obesity in the United States doubled the number of inconclusive diagnostic imaging exams over a 15-year period, as per a research studyfeatured in the recent issue of Radiology.

Scientists assessed all radiology exams performed at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) between 1989 and 2003 to determine the effects of obesity on imaging quality and diagnosis.

In an effort to quantify how obesity affects diagnostic imaging........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 7/25/2006 6:16:51 AM)

Tamoxifen does not prevent breast cancer most women

Tamoxifen does not prevent breast cancer  most women
"We observed that for women at the lower end of the high-risk range for developing breast cancer, there is a very small likelihood that taking tamoxifen will reduce mortality," said Joy Melnikow, professor of family and community medicine at UC Davis School of Medicine and Medical Center and lead author of the study. "This would support revising the current recommended risk threshold for physicians to counsel women about tamoxifen".
........Go to the Breast-cancer-blog (Added on 7/24/2006 6:39:02 AM)

Slowing Alzheimer's disease

Slowing Alzheimer's disease
Scientists have uncovered the pathways behind the protection offered by environmental stimulation in Alzheimer's disease, further confirming that enhanced mental and physical activity slows neurological decline. The paper by Ambre et al., "Reduction of amyloid angiopathy and Aβ plaque burden after enriched housing in TgCRND8 mice: involvement of multiple pathways," appears in the recent issue of The American Journal of Pathology.
........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 7/24/2006 6:34:13 AM)

Prescription pain killer overdose

Prescription pain killer overdose
Trends analysis of drug poisoning deaths has helped explain a national epidemic of overdose deaths in the USA that began in the 1990s, concludes Leonard Paulozzi and his colleagues at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta, USA. The contribution of prescription pain killers to the epidemic has only become clear recently. This research is published this week in the journal, Pharmacoepidemiology and Drug Safety.

Drugs........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 7/23/2006 10:56:25 PM)

 

An Eye-opening Look At Anesthesia

An Eye-opening Look At Anesthesia
Raise your hand if you are more afraid of the prospect of general anesthesia than of surgery itself. If you raised your hand, you are not alone, as per the newest faculty member at the Harvard-MIT Division of Health Sciences and Technology (HST).

Dr. Emery N. Brown, who explores what happens to the brain during anesthesia, began a dual appointment as professor of health sciences and technology and professor of computational neuroscience in........Go to the GI news blog (Added on 7/31/2006 10:32:13 PM)

Malignant Melanoma Secretes Embryo Protein

Malignant Melanoma Secretes Embryo Protein
A Northwestern University research group has discovered that aggressive melanoma cells secrete Nodal, a protein that is critical to proper embryo formation.

An article describing this research was published recently in the advanced online issue of the journal Nature Medicine.

The scientists identified the potent and highly unstable embryonic growth factor by injecting aggressive melanoma cells into developing zebrafish embryos, which........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 7/31/2006 6:51:40 AM)

Interventions Should Start After The First Puff

Interventions Should Start After The First Puff
In this research study, Gervais and his colleagues describe the sequence and timing of 12 milestones (6 correlation to cigarette use and 6 to symptoms of nicotine dependence) among grade 7 students. They observed that symptoms of nicotine dependence can take hold long before regular smoking, even after the first puff in some cases.

This information needs to be incorporated into intervention programs aimed at young smokers.

In a related........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 7/31/2006 6:44:49 AM)

meditation and cognitive impairment

meditation and cognitive impairment
Scientists at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine are examining the effectiveness of meditation on early cognitive impairment. Once this new study is completed, the results could help answer lingering questions over whether or not stress-reducing techniques and mind exercises can lessen or even prevent cognitive decline. This is the first study at Penn's new "Center for Spirituality and the Mind," which evolved from work initiated........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 7/29/2006 8:12:58 PM)

Pigeons provide clues

Pigeons provide clues
Through studying pigeons with genetic heart disease, scientists at Wake Forest University School of Medicine have discovered a clue about why some patients' heart vessels are prone to close back up after angioplasty.

"We identified a regulator of genes that controls the growth of artery smooth muscle cells," said William Wagner, Ph.D., senior researcher. "Learning to modulate the uncontrolled growth of these cells could potentially solve the........Go to the Heart news blog (Added on 7/28/2006 10:34:47 PM)

Peaks And Troughs Of Dengue Epidemics

Peaks And Troughs Of Dengue Epidemics
Researchers have long known that epidemics of dengue fever wax and wane over a period of several years, but they've never been quite sure why. With the incidence and range of the potentially deadly mosquito-borne illness increasing, understanding the factors that influence these epidemics has never been more important.

A new study by scientists at the University of Georgia suggests that a brief period of cross-immunity conferred by any one........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 7/28/2006 10:03:45 PM)

Brain In Action

Brain In Action
For the first time, researchers have been able to watch neurons within the brain of a living animal change in response to experience.

Thanks to a new imaging system, scientists at the Picower Institute for Learning and Memory have gotten an unprecedented look into how genes shape the brain in response to the environment. Their work is published in the July 28 issue of Cell.

"This work represents a technological breakthrough," said first........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 7/28/2006 9:35:08 PM)

Steroid Osteoporosis Connection

Steroid Osteoporosis Connection
Scientists are closing in on the solution to a persistent medical puzzle: why do high doses of cortisone, widely prescribed for asthma, rheumatoid arthritis and other inflammatory and autoimmune conditions, weaken bones?

Through studies of mice, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have now identified osteoclasts, cells that dismantle old bone, as the essential link between osteoporosis and cortisone. As........Go to the Research news blog (Added on 7/28/2006 9:26:32 PM)

Human Behavior Changes Infectious Diseases

Human Behavior Changes Infectious Diseases
Simple models predict that only one strain of an infectious disease can exist at one time, but observation suggests otherwise. In a study in the recent issue of The American Naturalist, Ken Eames and Matt Keeling (University of Warwick) use a mathematical model to help explain multiple strains, showing that the way humans interact is all-important. The scientists observed that the coexistence of multiple infectious disease strains result from........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 7/26/2006 5:28:20 PM)

Identifying Medical Proxy

Identifying Medical Proxy
One-third of married individuals choose someone other than their spouse as a surrogate for medical decision-making. And more often than not, when adult patients chose a parent, sibling or child, they prefer their mothers, sisters and daughters to serve as medical proxies over their fathers, brothers and sons.

These are among the results of a study on advance care planning conducted by Northwestern University researcher K. Michael Lipkin,........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 7/26/2006 5:20:14 PM)

how much the eye tells the brain

how much the eye tells the brain
Scientists at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine estimate that the human retina can transmit visual input at about the same rate as an Ethernet connection, one of the most common local area network systems used today. They present their findings in the recent issue of Current Biology. This line of scientific questioning points to ways in which neural systems compare to artificial ones, and can ultimately inform the design of........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 7/26/2006 4:54:33 PM)

Save Money And Reduce Crime

Save Money And Reduce Crime
The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA), National Institutes of Health, today released a landmark scientific report showing that effective therapy of drug abuse and addiction can save communities money and reduce crime. Principles of Drug Abuse Treatment for Criminal Justice Populations outlines some of the proven components for successful therapy of drug abusers who have entered the criminal justice system, leading to lower rates of drug........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 7/25/2006 8:56:24 PM)

Unlocking the Deadliest Malaria Parasite

Unlocking the Deadliest Malaria Parasite
Scientists at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University have leveraged the results of their research into tuberculosis to craft a tool for unlocking the secrets of another of the world's leading infectious killers-malaria.

These findings, reported in the recent issue of Nature Methods, "should substantially speed up research efforts to bring malaria under control," says Dr. David Fidock, senior author of the paper and an........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 7/25/2006 8:25:53 PM)

Identical Twins Be Genetically Different

Identical Twins Be Genetically Different
They sleep together, eat together, and most people find it impossible to tell them apart. Identical twins who grow up together share just about everything, including their genes. But sometimes only one twin will have health problems when genetics predicts both of them should.

Researchers at the University of Michigan Medical School are just beginning to understand how two people who are so similar biologically can be so different when it........Go to the Pediatric news blog (Added on 7/25/2006 8:17:20 PM)

Nerve-stimulation Epilepsy Treatment

Nerve-stimulation Epilepsy Treatment
A unique nerve-stimulation therapy for epilepsy developed at UCLA offers a potential new alternative for tens of thousands of individuals unable to control their seizures with medicine and ineligible for surgery.

Developed by neuroresearchers at the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and Valencia, Calif.-based Advanced Bionics Corp., trigeminal nerve stimulation (TNS) uses a "brain pacemaker" to stimulate a nerve involved in inhibiting........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 7/25/2006 8:13:48 PM)

Take a deep breath

Take a deep breath
Ventilation treatment burst into the public consciousness more than 60 years ago with the "iron lung" and the polio epidemic. Mechanical ventilation has come a long way since then and is used today with patients who cannot breathe on their own because of trauma, lung injuries and chronic lung disease.

But ventilation demands a delicate balance between over inflating and under inflating the lungs, either of which can lead to further injury.........Go to the Lung news blog (Added on 7/25/2006 6:30:10 AM)

Risk Of Estrogen Plus Testosterone Therapy

Risk Of Estrogen Plus Testosterone Therapy
Women who take a combination of estrogen and testosterone to treat the symptoms of menopause may have an increased risk of breast cancer, as per an article in the July 24 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals.

As women age, their natural levels of the hormone testosterone tend to decrease, as per background information in the article. Some evidence suggests that a number of of the symptoms of........Go to the Breast-cancer-blog (Added on 7/25/2006 12:20:19 AM)

People Unconsciously Use Verbal Gestures

People Unconsciously Use Verbal Gestures
University of Chicago researchers have determined that people spontaneously use a system of communicating when they speak that either reinforces their message or provides additional information that is not conveyed by words alone. Dubbed "analog acoustic expression," this previously uninvestigated form of communication is described as a sort of verbal gesturing.

Like gestures, analog acoustic expression expands people's capacity to........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 7/24/2006 6:58:44 AM)

Gleevec can be toxic to the heart

Gleevec can be toxic to the heart
A team of researchers led by Thomas Force, M.D., James C. Wilson Professor of Medicine at Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, has shown in studies in both mice and in heart cells in culture that Gleevec can cause heart failure. The results of the study, prompted by 10 patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) who developed severe congestive heart failure while taking Gleevec, appear.

July 23, 2006, in an advanced........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 7/23/2006 11:06:26 PM)

Chronic Stress And Ovarian Cancer

Chronic Stress And Ovarian Cancer
When mice with ovary cancer are stressed, their tumors grow and spread more quickly, but that effect can be blocked using a medicine usually prescribed for heart disease, as per a preclinical study by scientists at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center.

The finding, reported in the journal Nature Medicine, now available on-line, provides the first measurable link between psychological stress and the biological processes that........Go to the Ovarian cancer blog (Added on 7/23/2006 10:21:02 PM)

 

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Cancer terms:
Oncologist: Physician or surgeon who had specialized in the treatment of cancer. Medical oncologists usually treat patients with chemotherapy, hormonal therapy and biological therapy, radiation oncologists treat cancer with radiation therapy and surgical oncologists treat patients with surgery. See cancer terms for more cancer related terms.

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