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Ant guts could pave the way for better drugs

Ant guts could pave the way for better drugs
Researchers have discovered two key proteins that guide one of the two groups of pathogenic bacteria to make their hardy outer shells -- their defense against the world. The work, they said, could allow scientists to create new antibiotics against gram-negative bacteria, like E. coli and salmonella, that would destroy these bacteria by disabling the mechanism that produces their protective coating. "A long-term goal is to find inhibitors........Go to the Research news blog (Added on 3/25/2008 8:04:50 PM)

New approach to help control drug resistance in leukemia

New approach to help control drug resistance in leukemia
Oregon Health & Science University Cancer Institute scientists have observed that an experimental drug known as SGX393 is effective against Gleevec-resistant chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). The results of their study will be published the week of March 24th in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Gleevec, the targeted treatment identified by OHSU Cancer Institute Director Brian Druker, M.D., is the current first line........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 3/24/2008 8:09:32 PM)

Mutant proteins could lead to new treatment for heart disease

Mutant proteins could lead to new treatment for heart disease
Heart damage due to blocked arteries remains the leading cause of disease and death in the Western world, but a Florida State University College of Medicine researcher is helping to open new pathways toward treating the problem. Michael Blaber, a professor in the department of biomedical sciences, is researching mutant forms of a human protein that have been shown to help the human body grow new blood vessels to restore blood flow in damaged........Go to the Heart-watch-blog (Added on 3/24/2008 7:57:23 PM)

Obesity and cancer sreening

Obesity and cancer sreening
A review of cancer screening studies shows that white women who are obese are less likely than healthy weight women to get the recommended screenings for breast and cervical cancer, as per scientists at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hills School of Public Health. The trend was not seen as consistently among black women; however there were fewer high quality studies that examined black women separately. Obesity is increasing,........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 3/24/2008 7:53:01 PM)

Does stress damage the brain?

Does stress damage the brain?
Individuals who experience military combat obviously endure extreme stress, and this exposure leaves a number of diagnosed with the psychiatric condition of post-traumatic stress disorder, or PTSD. PTSD is linked to several abnormalities in brain structure and function. However, as researcher Roger Pitman explains, Eventhough it is tempting to conclude that these abnormalities were caused by the traumatic event, it is also possible that they........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 3/18/2008 9:11:57 PM)

Vegan Diet Promotes Atheroprotective Antibodies

Vegan Diet Promotes Atheroprotective Antibodies
A gluten-free vegan diet may improve the health of patients with rheumatoid arthritis, as per new research from Karolinska Institutet. The diet has a beneficial effect on several risk factors for cardiovascular disease. Rheumatoid arthritis is linked to an increased risk of atherosclerosis (hardening of the arteries) and cardiovascular diseases. The underlying causes are unknown, but scientists suspect that the disturbed balance of blood........Go to the Rheumatology news blog (Added on 3/18/2008 8:57:13 PM)

Risk of Alzheimer's disease in their lifetime

Risk of Alzheimer's disease in their lifetime
Scientists from Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM) have estimated that one in six women are at risk for developing Alzheimers disease (AD) in their lifetime, while the risk for men is one in ten. These findings were released recently by the Alzheimers Association in their publication 2008 Alzheimers Disease: Facts and Figures. Stroke and dementia are the most widely feared age-related neurological diseases, and are also the only........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 3/18/2008 8:39:02 PM)

Lack Of Exercise And Chronic Disease

Lack Of Exercise And Chronic Disease
For years, researchers have been proclaiming the benefits of exercise. Studies showing that regular exercise benefits human health have exploded in number, examining a number of health problems ranging from cancer and diabetes to arthritis and pre-mature death. Now, a University of Missouri researcher has found direct evidence to support the claim of the Centers for Disease Control that a reduction in daily physical activity is an actual........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 3/18/2008 8:29:16 PM)

Pycnogenol improves memory in elderly

Pycnogenol improves memory in elderly
New research accepted for publication in the Journal of Psychopharmacology, demonstrates Pycnogenol, (pic-noj-en-all), an antioxidant plant extract from the bark of the French maritime pine tree, improves the memory of senior citizens. The study results revealed Pycnogenol improved both numerical working memory as well as spatial working memory using a computerized testing system. The research was presented last week at the Oxygen Club of........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 3/18/2008 5:09:01 AM)

Curbing teen drinking difficult in urban areas

Curbing teen drinking difficult in urban areas
Keeping middle schoolers from alcohol is a tougher task in the inner city than in rural areas, even for experts armed with the best prevention programs, a new University of Florida study shows. A three-year, three-pronged prevention program did little to keep Chicago middle schoolers from drinking or using drugs, despite its previous success in rural Minnesota, where the program reduced alcohol use 20 to 30 percent, UF and University of........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 3/17/2008 10:13:15 PM)

Meditation Impacts Blood Pressure

Meditation Impacts Blood Pressure
Transcendental Meditation is an effective therapy for controlling hypertension with the added benefit of bypassing possible side effects and hazards of anti-high blood pressure drugs, as per a new meta-analysis conducted at the University of Kentucky. The study appears in the recent issue of the American Journal of Hypertension. The meta-analysis reviewed nine randomized, controlled trials using Transcendental Meditation as a primary........Go to the Heart-watch-blog (Added on 3/16/2008 9:56:12 PM)

new light on inflammatory diseases

new light on inflammatory diseases
Investigators at Hospital for Special Surgery have identified a new mechanism involved in the pathogenesis of inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. The mechanism may also shed some light on why gene treatment experiments that use adenoviruses to deliver genes to humans have run into problems. The study will appear online on March 16 in the journal Nature Immunology. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF) is known to play a role in several........Go to the Rheumatology news blog (Added on 3/16/2008 9:20:47 PM)

Artificial butter chemical harmful to lungs

Artificial butter chemical harmful to lungs
A new study shows that exposure to a chemical called diacetyl, a component of artificial butter flavoring, can be harmful to the nose and airways of mice. Researchers at the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS), part of the National Institutes of Health, conducted the study because diacetyl has been implicated in causing obliterative bronchiolitis (OB) in humans. OB is a debilitating but rare lung disease, which has been........Go to the Lung news blog (Added on 3/13/2008 9:16:40 PM)

Memory on Trial

Memory on Trial
The U.S. legal system has long assumed that all testimony is not equally credible, that some witnesses are more reliable than others. In tough cases with child witnesses, it assumes adult witnesses to be more reliable. But what if the legal system had it wrong? Scientists Valerie Reyna, human development professor, and Chuck Brainerd, human development and law school professor--both from Cornell University--argue that like the two-headed........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 3/13/2008 8:48:37 PM)

How diabetes drives atherosclerosis

How diabetes drives atherosclerosis
Scientists have discovered how diabetes, by driving inflammation and slowing blood flow, dramatically accelerates atherosclerosis, as per research would be reported in the March 14 edition of the journal Circulation Research. Experts once believed that atherosclerosis, or hardening of the arteries, developed when too much cholesterol clogged arteries with fatty deposits called plaques. When blood vessels became completely blocked, heart........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 3/13/2008 8:44:28 PM)

How to block Fugitive cancer cells

How to block Fugitive cancer cells
Cancer cells get a helping hand from platelets, specialized blood cells involved in clotting. Platelets shelter and feed tumor cells that stray into the bloodstream, making it easier for cancer to spread, or metastasize. Research at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis suggests that inactivating platelets could slow down or prevent metastasis. In advance online publication in the Journal of Cellular Biochemistry, the........Go to the Lung-cancer-blog (Added on 3/13/2008 8:12:16 PM)

Revise guidelines for weight gain during pregnancy

Revise guidelines for weight gain during pregnancy
Current recommendations for weight gain during pregnancy developed by the Institute of Medicine (IOM) in 1990 should be revised, as per an internationally recognized obesity expert and chairman of the department of obstetrics, gynecology and womens health at Saint Louis University. The editorial by Raul Artal, M.D., who has conducted extensive research on obesity during pregnancy, appears in the recent issue of Expert Review of Obstetrics........Go to the OBGYN news blog (Added on 3/11/2008 10:10:10 PM)

How digits grow

How digits grow
Researchers at the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health (SMPH) are wagging a finger at currently held notions about the way digits are formed. Studying the embryonic chick foot, the developmental biologists have come up with a model that explains how digits grow and why each digit is different from the others. As reported in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Online Early Edition the week of March........Go to the Research news blog (Added on 3/11/2008 9:56:52 PM)

Recurrent low-grade carcinoma of the ovary less responsive to chemo

Recurrent low-grade carcinoma of the ovary less responsive to chemo
Recurrent low-grade serous carcinoma, a rare type of ovary cancer, is less sensitive to chemotherapy and therefore more difficult to treat than more common high-grade ovary cancers, as per scientists from The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center. The findings were reported at the Society of Gynecologic Oncologists 39th Annual Meeting on Women's Cancers. The retrospective study is the first to analyze how women with low-grade........Go to the Ovarian cancer blog (Added on 3/11/2008 5:42:26 AM)

Advanced-stage ovarian cancer patients with BRCA live longe

Advanced-stage ovarian cancer patients with BRCA live longe
Two abstracts underscoring the importance of testing for BRCA1/2 mutations in women with ovary cancer were presented at this week's Society of Gynecologic Oncologists 39th Annual Meeting on Women's Cancers, by scientists from The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center. In the first study, a multicenter research team led by M.D. Anderson found advanced- stage ovary cancer patients with non-Ashkenazi Jewish BRCA (non-AJ BRCA)........Go to the Research news blog (Added on 3/11/2008 5:40:32 AM)

 

Partners can help or hinder attempts at changing diet

Partners can help or hinder attempts at changing diet
For people trying to make a change in their diet, significant others generally play a positive and supportive role, but sometimes respond in negative ways, as per a research studyin the March/April Journal of Nutrition Education and Behavior (http://www.jneb.org/). Led by Judy Paisley, Ph.D., R.D., of Ryerson University, Toronto, the scientists looked at how significant others responded when their partners attempted to make a dietary change........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 3/25/2008 10:19:25 PM)

JAMA editor-in-chief comments on Pfizer lawsuit

JAMA editor-in-chief comments on Pfizer lawsuit
In an editorial published early online today, JAMA Editor-in-Chief Catherine D. DeAngelis, M.D., M.P.H., and JAMA Editorial Counsel Joseph P. Thornton, J.D., write about a recent court ruling regarding litigation involving JAMA and the Archives of Internal Medicine (AIM) that significantly threatened the integrity of our peer review process. Attorneys for the pharmaceutical company Pfizer, Inc. had issued subpoenas last year to obtain........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 3/24/2008 8:08:03 PM)

The surprising power of the pill

The surprising power of the pill
Women who have tried to conceive using in vitro fertilization (IVF) methods are painfully aware that timing is of the essence. There are cancelled vacations, too a number of sick days taken from work, and the necessity to plan everything around the therapy. But thanks to a Tel Aviv University study, trying for a baby has just been made easier. In a surprising finding, scientists have discovered that the same pill used to prevent pregnancy........Go to the OBGYN news blog (Added on 3/24/2008 7:55:27 PM)

Dramatic Rise in Hepatitis C-Related Deaths in the United States

Dramatic Rise in Hepatitis C-Related Deaths in the United States
Hepatitis C-related deaths in the United States increased by 123 percent from 1995 through 2004, the most recent year for which data are available. Mortality rates peaked in 2002, then declined slightly overall, while continuing to rise among people 55 to 64 years old. These findings are reported in the recent issue of Hepatology, a journal of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases (AASLD). The article is also available online........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 3/24/2008 7:50:34 PM)

Solving the drug price crisis

Solving the drug price crisis
The mounting U.S. drug price crisis can be contained and eventually reversed by separating drug discovery from drug marketing and by establishing a non-profit company to oversee funding for new medicines, as per two MIT experts on the pharmaceutical industry. Stan Finkelstein, M.D., senior research scientist in MIT's Engineering Systems Division, and Peter Temin, Elisha Gray II Professor of Economics, present their research and detail their........Go to the Health news blog (Added on 3/20/2008 7:44:40 PM)

Grape skin compound fights the complications of diabetes

Grape skin compound fights the complications of diabetes
Research carried out by researchers at the Peninsula Medical School in the South West of England has observed that resveratrol, a compound present naturally in grape skin, can protect against the cellular damage to blood vessels caused by high production of glucose in diabetes, as per a paper reported in the science journal Diabetes, Obesity and Metabolism this week. The elevated levels of glucose that circulate in the blood of patients with........Go to the Diabetic news blog (Added on 3/18/2008 9:05:36 PM)

Scientists successfully awaken sleeping stem cells

Scientists successfully awaken sleeping stem cells
Researchers at Schepens Eye Research Institute have discovered what chemical in the eye triggers the dormant capacity of certain non-neuronal cells to transform into progenitor cells, a stem-like cell that can generate new retinal cells. The discovery, reported in the recent issue of Investigative Ophthalmology and Visual Science (IOVS), offers new hope to victims of diseases that harm the retina, such as macular degeneration and retinitis........Go to the Research news blog (Added on 3/18/2008 8:40:48 PM)

Spring training for parents?

Spring training for parents?
As cries of play ball ring out this spring, they undoubtedly will be followed by complaints of anxiety and stress from young athletes wanting to quit sports. Parents and coaches can make youth sports a fun, learning experience or a nightmare, as per sport psychology experts at the University of Washington. But to achieve the former, sports officials and organizations must provide more training programs, particularly for parents, as per........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 3/18/2008 8:30:40 PM)

Neighborhoods Play Key Role In How Much People Exercise

Neighborhoods Play Key Role In How Much People Exercise
The neighborhoods people live in can help inspire - or discourage - their residents to exercise and keep physically active, new research suggests. Residents of neighborhoods with higher levels of poverty, lower education, and more female-headed families are less likely than others to exercise, as per the study. It's not simply that poorer people are less likely to exercise, scientists say. In fact, the study, which was done in Chicago,........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 3/17/2008 10:26:16 PM)

Breast cancer in black women

Breast cancer in black women
Scientists at the University of Chicago are studying possible connections between living in disadvantaged neighborhoods and the development of early onset breast cancer in a path-breaking project led by Sarah Gehlert, Director of the Center for Interdisciplinary Health Disparities Research at the University. The initiative is funded with a $9.7 million grant from National Institutes of Health and is the first to use animal models to help........Go to the Breast-cancer-blog (Added on 3/17/2008 10:06:00 PM)

Researchers use light to detect Alzheimer's

Researchers use light to detect Alzheimer's
A team of scientists in Bedford, Mass. has developed a way of examining brain tissue with near-infrared light to detect signs of Alzheimer's disease. In the March 15 issue of the journal Optics Letters, published by the Optical Society of America, the team describes how they used optical technology to examine tissue samples taken from different autopsies and correctly identified which samples came from people who had Alzheimer's disease.........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 3/16/2008 9:39:25 PM)

Second depth-perception method in brain

Second depth-perception method in brain
Its common knowledge that humans and other animals are able to visually judge depth because we have two eyes and the brain compares the images from each. But we can also judge depth with only one eye, and researchers have been searching for how the brain accomplishes that feat. Now, a team led by a scientist at the University of Rochester believes it has discovered the answer in a small part of the brain that processes both the image from a........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 3/16/2008 9:25:00 PM)

Link between common cold and ear infection

Link between common cold and ear infection
A new five-year study at the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston confirms the suspected close link between the two most common diseases of young children: colds and ear infections. The study, which appears in the March 15 issue of Clinical Infectious Disease, confirmed the suspected close link between the two most common diseases of young children, viral colds and ear infections. It also identified the viruses linked to higher........Go to the ENT news blog (Added on 3/13/2008 9:12:20 PM)

Preventing spread of ovarian cancer

Preventing spread of ovarian cancer
A drug that blocks production of an enzyme that enables ovary cancer to gain a foothold in a new site can slow the spread of the disease and prolong survival in mice, as per a research studyby scientists from the University of Chicago Medical Center, but only if the drug is given early in the disease process. In the recent issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation, the scientists show that an enzyme known as MMP-2 is necessary for ovary........Go to the Ovarian cancer blog (Added on 3/13/2008 9:10:29 PM)

Pain Receptor in Brain and Memory

Pain Receptor in Brain and Memory
Researchers have long known that the nervous system receptor known as TRPV1 can affect sensations of pain in the body. Now a group of Brown University researchers has observed that these receptors - a darling of drug developers - also may play a role in learning and memory in the brain. In surprising new research, reported in the journal Neuron, Julie Kauer and her team show that activation of TPRV1 receptors can trigger long-term........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 3/13/2008 8:23:43 PM)

Paradoxical Alzheimer's finding linking memory loss

Paradoxical Alzheimer's finding linking memory loss
Do you remember the seventh song that played on your radio on the way to work yesterday? Most of us dont, thanks to a normal forgetting process that is constantly cleaning house culling inconsequential information from our brains. Scientists at the Buck Institute now think that this normal memory loss is hyper-activated in Alzheimers disease (AD) and that this effect is key to the profound memory loss linked to the incurable neurodegenerative........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 3/12/2008 9:31:35 PM)

Ibuprofen Works Against Aspirin

Ibuprofen Works Against Aspirin
Stroke patients who use ibuprofen for arthritis pain or other conditions while taking aspirin to reduce the risk of a second stroke undermine aspirin's ability to act as an anti-platelet agent, scientists at the University at Buffalo have shown. In a cohort of patients seen by physicians at two offices of the Dent Neurologic Institute, 28 patients were identified as taking both aspirin and ibuprofen (a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, or........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 3/12/2008 9:29:05 PM)

Road map to safer pain control

Road map to safer pain control
At a time when several U.S. health insurers have discontinued payment for use of the sedative propofol during most screening colonoscopies, physicians at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine have discovered that an alternative way to administer the drug could both save millions of health care dollars and provide a safer way to deliver optimal pain relief. The scientists studied two groups of patients who received........Go to the Research news blog (Added on 3/11/2008 9:58:51 PM)

New nerve cells originate from neural stem cells

New nerve cells originate from neural stem cells
Most cells in the human brain are not nerve cells, but supporting cells (glial cells). They serve as a framework for nerve cells and play an important role in the wound reaction that occurs with injuries to the brain. However, what these reactive glial cells in the brains of mice and men originate from, and which cells they evolve into was hitherto unknown. Now, the study group of Prof. Dr. Magdalena Gtz is able to show that after injury,........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 3/11/2008 7:51:54 PM)

Breakthrough Drug for Clot Victims

Breakthrough Drug for Clot Victims
Washington University scientists have identified the mechanism that makes a bioengineered enzyme function efficiently, opening the way to clinical development of the first safe clot busting agent for treating heart attacks and strokes. A team of scientists at Oregon Health & Science University and Washington University in St. Louis have described for the first time the mechanism that gives a mutant enzyme molecule that they have engineered -........Go to the Research news blog (Added on 3/11/2008 5:37:06 AM)

 

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Cancer terms:
Oncologist: Physician or surgeon who had specialized in the treatment of cancer. Medical oncologists usually treat patients with chemotherapy, hormonal therapy and biological therapy, radiation oncologists treat cancer with radiation therapy and surgical oncologists treat patients with surgery. See cancer terms for more cancer related terms.

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