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Zopiclone over use and impaired decision making

Zopiclone over use and impaired decision making
A newly released study from the Norwegian Institute of Public Health shows a positive link between the amount of the hypnotic (sleeping medicine) zopiclone in the blood and the chance of being assessed as impaired in a clinical examination. The study also included drivers who only showed alcohol in their blood test. - This could be important background knowledge in the discussion about establishing legal limits in traffic for sedatives or........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 3/27/2009 5:28:40 AM)


Anorexia and psychiatric disorders

Anorexia and psychiatric disorders
The study was initiated in 1985. A total of 51 teenagers with anorexia nervosa were studied, together with an equally large control group of healthy persons. The groups have been investigated and compared several times as the years have passed. "This study is unique in an international perspective. It is the only study in the world that reflects the natural course of anorexia nervosa in the population", says Elisabet Wentz, Associate........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 3/26/2009 9:53:42 PM)


Public transit may help you keep fit

Public transit may help you keep fit
A newly released study by scientists at the University of British Columbia suggests taking public transit may help you keep fit. The study, reported in the Journal of Public Health Policy, finds that people who take public transit are three times more likely than those who don't to meet the Heart and Stroke Foundation of Canada's suggested daily minimum of physical activity. Doctoral student Ugo Lachapelle and Assoc. Prof. Lawrence Frank........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 3/26/2009 9:46:59 PM)


Exercise and Migraine

Exercise and Migraine
While physical exercise has been shown to trigger migraine headaches among sufferers, a newly released study describes an exercise program that is well tolerated by patients. The findings show that the program decreased the frequency of headaches and improved quality of life. The study is published in Headache: The Journal of Head and Face Pain. The study used a sample of migraine sufferers who were examined before, during and after an........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 3/26/2009 9:34:52 PM)


Mixed messages from TV shows

Mixed messages from TV shows
EPA is releasing a new approach to advance the science upon which the agency bases its regulatory decisions and policies, resulting in better protection for human health and the environment. Today, EPA released the "U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's Strategic Plan for Evaluating the Toxicity of Chemicals." This strategic plan outlines a new scientific approach that will allow EPA to assess risks from many chemicals and mixtures by........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 3/25/2009 9:58:41 PM)


What influeces floral purchase

What influeces floral purchase
Scientific studies of "consumption value" explore the reasons consumers choose particular products and provide marketers with ways to analyze consumer behavior and influence purchasing. Studying the value of consumption is believed to have diagnostic value in the analysis of consumer choice behavior and, therefore, is helpful in improving the efficiency of the market. To enhance efficiency and promotion, it is essential for marketers to know........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 3/25/2009 9:35:47 PM)


Read meat consumption may be dangerous

Read meat consumption may be dangerous
Individuals who eat more red meat and processed meat appear to have a modestly increased risk of death from all causes and also from cancer or heart disease over a 10-year period, as per a report in the March 23 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals. In contrast, a higher intake of white meat appeared to be linked to a slightly decreased risk for overall death and cancer death. "Meat intake varies........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 3/23/2009 10:09:41 PM)


High triglyceride levels common

High triglyceride levels common
High concentrations of blood fats known as triglycerides are common in the United States, as per a report in the March 23 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals. Changes in lifestyle are the preferred initial therapy for hypertriglyceridemia (the resulting condition), but physical inactivity, obesity and other modifiable risk factors remain prevalent. "Increasing evidence supports triglyceride concentration........Go to the Heart-watch-blog (Added on 3/23/2009 10:00:31 PM)


Acetaldehyde in alcohol

Acetaldehyde in alcohol
A newly released study published recently in the journal Addiction shows that drinking alcohol is the greatest risk factor for acetaldehyde-related cancer. Heavy drinkers appears to be at increased risk due to exposure from multiple sources. Acetaldehyde is ubiquitous in daily life. Widely present in the environment, it is inhaled from the air and tobacco smoke, ingested from alcohol and foods, and produced in the human body during the........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 3/22/2009 9:54:42 PM)


Why is it difficult to recognize faces on photo negatives?

Why is it difficult to recognize faces on photo negatives?
Humans excel at recognizing faces, but how we do this has been an abiding mystery in neuroscience and psychology. In an effort to explain our success in this area, scientists are taking a closer look at how and why we fail. A newly released study from MIT looks at a especially striking instance of failure: our impaired ability to recognize faces in photographic negatives. The study, which appears in the Proceedings of the National Academy of........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 3/19/2009 6:10:23 AM)


Longer bouts of exercise to prevent childhood obesity

Longer bouts of exercise to prevent childhood obesity
Children who exercise in bouts of activity lasting five minutes or longer are less likely to become obese than those whose activity levels are more sporadic and typically last less than five minutes each, Queen's University scientists have discovered. Led by Kinesiology and Health Studies professor Ian Janssen, the newly released study supports Canada's Physical Activity Guidelines for Children and Youth, which call for children to........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 3/19/2009 5:19:17 AM)


Few friends combined with loneliness

Few friends combined with loneliness
Eventhough not having a number of close friends contributes to poorer health for a number of elderly adults, those who also feel lonely face even greater health risks, research at the University of Chicago suggests. Older people who are able to adjust to being alone don't have the same health problems. The study is the first to examine the relationships between health and two different types of isolation. Scientists measured the degree to........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 3/19/2009 5:13:01 AM)


Lung cancer: Molecular scissors in action

Lung cancer: Molecular scissors in action
In the past few years, many anti-cancer drugs have been developed which are directed selectively against specific key molecules of tumor cells. Among these is an antibody called cetuximab, which attaches to a protein molecule that is found in large amounts on the surface of a number of types of cancer cells. When this surface molecule, called epidermal growth factor receptor, or EGF-R for short, is blocked by cetuximab, the cancer cell receives........Go to the Lung-cancer-blog (Added on 3/18/2009 5:19:47 AM)


Flu Infection and Pneumonia

Flu Infection and Pneumonia
A joint venture from scientists from the Helmholtz-Centre for Infection Research (HZI) in Braunschweig, the Otto-von-Guericke-University in Magdeburg, and the Karolinska institute in Sweden have taken an in-depth look at the correlation between flu infection and pneumonia. Their results, recently released in the scientific journal "PLoS One", have disproven a common theory about flu-like pneumonia. Some viral infections trigger a decrease of........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 3/18/2009 5:17:42 AM)


Engineering flu vaccines

Engineering flu vaccines
A new computerized method of testing could help world health officials better identify flu vaccines that are effective against multiple strains of the disease. Rice University researchers who created the method say tests of data from bird flu and seasonal flu outbreaks suggest their method can better gauge the efficacy of proposed vaccines than can tests used today. Rice's Michael Deem, the lead scientist on the project, will present the........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 3/18/2009 5:08:23 AM)


Genetic Basis of Exercise

Genetic Basis of Exercise
'Adaptation to exercise' is a familiar phenomenon, even if the phrase is not: A sedentary person takes up jogging and can barely make it around the block. After jogging regularly for a few weeks, the person can jog a mile, then two, then three. With regular exercise, the body adapts, becoming fitter and more efficient. The heart can pump more blood, delivering more oxygen to the muscles. The muscles get stronger, and so on. There are........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 3/18/2009 5:01:36 AM)


How clean are your hands?

How clean are your hands?
Epidemiologists and computer researchers at the University of Iowa have collaborated to create a new low-cost, green technology for automatically tracking the use of hand hygiene dispensers before healthcare workers enter and after they exit patient rooms. This novel method of monitoring hand hygiene compliance, which is essential for infection control in hospitals, was released recently at the annual meeting of the Society for Healthcare........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 3/18/2009 4:59:10 AM)


Obese woman and breast cancer risk

Obese woman and breast cancer risk
greater risk of breast cancer by not undergoing regular screening. As per new research by Dr. Nisa Maruthur and her team from The John Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore, USA, seriously obese women are significantly less likely to say they have undergone a recent mammography than normal weight women, particularly if they are white. Maruthur's findings are published online this week in Springer's Journal of General Internal........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 3/16/2009 8:08:23 PM)


Importance of healthy living

Importance of healthy living
Women who maintain a healthy weight and who have lower perceived stress appears to be less likely to have chromosome changes linked to aging than obese and stressed women, as per a pilot study that was part of the Sister Study. The long-term Sister Study is looking at the environmental and genetic characteristics of women whose sister had breast cancer to identify factors linked to developing breast cancer. This early pilot used baseline........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 3/16/2009 7:54:36 PM)


Is it really only our kidneys that control blood pressure?

Is it really only our kidneys that control blood pressure?
The problem of hypertension has reached pandemic proportions, causing premature death through heart attacks, strokes and kidney disease in a third of the UK population. For decades, researchers have battled at length over its cause yet still cannot agree; is the kidney or the brain to blame?. This month, Experimental Physiology hosts a lively debate between two groups of world-leading experts. In the first ever published dialogue on the........Go to the Heart-watch-blog (Added on 3/16/2009 5:20:00 AM)


 

Why African-Americans have lower rate of liver disease?

Why  African-Americans have lower rate of liver disease?
Where different ethnic groups store fat in their bodies may account for differences in the likelihood they'll develop insulin resistance and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, scientists at UT Southwestern Medical Center have found. As per research published in the online edition and the recent issue of Hepatology, African-Americans with insulin resistance might harbor factors that protect them from this form of metabolic liver disease. ........Go to the GI news blog (Added on 3/27/2009 5:24:29 AM)


Neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease

Neurodegeneration in Alzheimer's disease
IMAGE: Tiny, toxic protein particles severely disrupt neurotransmission and inhibit delivery of key proteins in Alzheimer's disease, two separate studies by Marine Biological Laboratory (MBL) scientists have found. The particles are minute clumps of amyloid beta, which has long been known to accumulate and form plaques in the brain of Alzheimer's patients. "These small particles that haven't aggregated into plaquesthese are........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 3/26/2009 9:56:21 PM)


Do Americans have an identity crisis?

Do Americans have an identity crisis?
Say goodbye to Italian-Americans and German-Americans and say hello to Vietnamese-Americans, Salvadoran-Americans and a bunch of other hyphenated Americans. The way people identify themselves in the United States is changing, and the way the federal census classifies them by race or ethnicity isn't painting a clear portrait of America, as per new research. University of Washington demographers who analyzed 2000 census data contend that........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 3/26/2009 9:36:26 PM)


Cholesterol crystals and heart attack

Cholesterol crystals and heart attack
For the first time ever, a Michigan State University researcher has shown cholesterol crystals can disrupt plaque in a patient's cardiovascular system, causing a heart attack or stroke. The findings by a team led by George Abela, chief of the cardiology division in MSU's College of Human Medicine, could dramatically shift the way doctors and scientists approach cardiovascular attacks. Abela's findings are reported in the recent issue of the........Go to the Heart-watch-blog (Added on 3/26/2009 9:27:49 PM)


Daily consumption cannabis may lead to psychosis

Daily consumption cannabis may lead to psychosis
The daily consumption of cannabis predisposes to the appearance of psychosis and schizophrenia, and those episodes of psychosis which are fruit of this substance present certain specific characteristics, both before their appearance and in the clinical presentation of the psychosis. This is one of the conclusions of the doctoral thesis "Neurodevelopment and environmental stress in initial psychosis: transversal analysis of the ESPIGAS study",........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 3/25/2009 10:02:39 PM)


Intensive insulin therapy has its own risks

Intensive insulin therapy has its own risks
Intensive insulin treatment increases significantly the risk of hypoglycemia in critically ill patients, found a newly released study in CMAJ (http://www.cmaj.ca/press/cmaj.090206.pdf). Intensive insulin treatment is used in a number of intensive care units around the world as a means to tightly regulate blood sugar. Eventhough labour intensive, it has been recommended as a standard of care for critically ill patients by a number of........Go to the Diabetic news blog (Added on 3/24/2009 6:18:22 AM)


Smoking may be lead to pancreatitis

Smoking may be lead to pancreatitis
Smoking may be linked to an increased risk of acute and chronic pancreatitis, as per a report in the March 23 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals. In addition, the risk of developing the disease appears to be higher in those who smoke more. The occurrence of pancreatitis (an inflammation of the pancreas commonly characterized by abdominal pain) has increased in recent decades, as per background........Go to the GI news blog (Added on 3/23/2009 10:05:25 PM)


Vitamin D supplements leads to improved bone health

Vitamin D supplements leads to improved bone health
Oral vitamin D supplements at a dose of at least 400 international units per day are linked to a reduced risk of bone fractures in elderly adults, as per results of a meta-analysis reported in the March 23 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals. "The anti-fracture benefits of vitamin D have been questioned by several recent trials, leading to uncertainty among patients and physicians regarding........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 3/23/2009 10:03:44 PM)


Do you have a family history of blood clots?

Do you have a family history of blood clots?
Children and siblings of those with venous thrombosis, or blood clots in the veins, appear to have more than double the risk of developing the condition than those without a family history, as per a report in the March 23 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals. Venous thrombosis typically begins in leg veins, eventhough the clot may subsequently break off and travel to the lungs. Several genetic risk........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 3/23/2009 9:58:49 PM)


A step closer to understanding how to control high blood sugar

A step closer to understanding how to control high blood sugar
Researchers are closer to understanding which proteins help control blood sugar, or glucose, during and after exercise. This understanding could lead to new drug therapies or more effective exercise to prevent Type 2 diabetes and other health problems linked to having high blood sugar. Insulin resistance happens when insulin produced by the body doesn't properly stimulate the transport of glucose into the cells for energy. Too much glucose........Go to the Diabetes-watch-blog (Added on 3/19/2009 6:13:37 AM)


Biopsy of recurrent breast cancer may alter treatment

Biopsy of recurrent breast cancer may alter treatment
For women with recurrent breast cancer, the therapy the doctor chooses is commonly based on the properties of their original breast cancer. A group from Toronto has recently completed the world's first study that compared original breast cancer tumors with a biopsy of suspected tumors that recurred elsewhere in the body. Scientists observed that the biopsy resulted in 20% of the women having a significant change in their therapy. In some........Go to the Breast-cancer-blog (Added on 3/19/2009 5:22:36 AM)


Genetic markers for aggressive head and neck cancer

Genetic markers for aggressive head and neck cancer
Researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University have identified genetic markers that signal poor outcomes for patients with head and neck cancer. These findings could one day lead to a genetic test that could help select or predict successful therapy options for patients with this type of cancer. The results were reported in the American Journal of Pathology Head and neck cancer refers to tumors in the mouth, throat........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 3/19/2009 5:15:19 AM)


How Brain Remembers Single Events

How Brain Remembers Single Events
Single events account for a number of of our most vivid memories - a marriage proposal, a wedding toast, a baby's birth. Until a recent UC Irvine discovery, however, researchers knew little about what happens inside the brain that allows you to remember such events. In a study with rats, neuroscientist John Guzowski and his colleagues observed that a single brief experience was as effective at activating neurons and genes linked to memory as........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 3/19/2009 5:10:52 AM)


The most natural of all skin creams

The most natural of all skin creams
Even after nine months soaking in the womb, a newborn's skin is smooth - unlike an adult's in the bath. While occupying a watery, warm environment, the newborn manages to develop a skin fully equipped to protect it in a cold, dry and bacteria-infected world. A protective cream called Vernix caseosa (VC), which covers the fetus and the newborn, aids in the growth of skin both before and after birth. VC provides 'waterproofing' in utero,........Go to the Skin news blog (Added on 3/18/2009 5:16:21 AM)


Cloning major sperm-binding proteins

Cloning major sperm-binding proteins
Dr. Manjunath and his colleagues have tried to isolate human BSPs for more than 10 years. In most mammals, these proteins are typically produced by the seminal vesicles and added to sperm at ejaculation. Yet this is not the case for humans, primates and rodents. As per Dr.Manjunath and his team, these species produce small amounts of BSPs only in the epididymis, a duct that connects the testes to the urethra. "For a few years, we were........Go to the Research news blog (Added on 3/18/2009 5:11:59 AM)


Mussels glue for faster surgical wound healing

Mussels glue for faster surgical wound healing
Using the natural glue that marine mussels use to stick to rocks, and a variation on the inkjet printer, a team of scientists led by North Carolina State University has devised a new way of making medical adhesives that could replace traditional sutures and result in less scarring, faster recovery times and increased precision for exacting operations such as eye surgery. Traditionally, there have been two ways to join tissue together in the........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 3/18/2009 5:06:17 AM)


Waking up dormant HIV

Waking up dormant HIV
HAART (highly active anti-retroviral treatment) has emerged as an extremely effective HIV therapy that keeps virus levels almost undetectable; however, HAART can never truly eradicate the virus as some HIV always remains dormant in cells. But, a chemical called suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA), recently approved as a leukemia drug, has now been shown to 'turn on' latent HIV, making it an attractive candidate to weed out the hidden virus........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 3/16/2009 8:22:42 PM)


Catching the common cold virus

Catching the common cold virus
A newly released study by Brigham Young University scientists on the virus behind nearly half of all cold infections explains how and where evolution occurs in the rhinovirus genome and what this means for possible vaccines. The study is published in the recent issue of the academic journal Molecular Biology and Evolution. "There are a lot of different approaches to treating the cold, none of which seem to be effective," said Keith........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 3/16/2009 7:57:45 PM)


A different perspective on obesity 'epidemic'

A different perspective on obesity 'epidemic'
Headlines tell us the nation is getting fatter, and that obesity has become an epidemic. But there is more to the story, as per one University of Houston sociologist. While she acknowledges that there has been a shift in body weight over the years, assistant sociology professor Samantha Kwan looks at obesity from a different perspective. The term obesity was constructed by the medical community, Kwan says. And the use of the Body Mass........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 3/16/2009 7:22:58 PM)


A natural approach for HIV vaccine

A natural approach for HIV vaccine
For 25 years, scientists have tried and failed to develop an HIV vaccine, primarily by focusing on a small number of engineered "super antibodies" to fend off the virus before it takes hold. So far, these magic bullet antibodies have proved impossible to produce in people. Now, in research to be published March 15 online by Nature, researchers at The Rockefeller University have laid out a new approach. They have identified a diverse team of........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 3/16/2009 5:17:43 AM)


 

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Cancer terms:
Oncologist: Physician or surgeon who had specialized in the treatment of cancer. Medical oncologists usually treat patients with chemotherapy, hormonal therapy and biological therapy, radiation oncologists treat cancer with radiation therapy and surgical oncologists treat patients with surgery. See cancer terms for more cancer related terms.

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