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Anesthesia not harmful for babies during birth process

Anesthesia not harmful for babies during birth process
Mayo Clinic scientists have observed that children exposed to anesthesia during Cesarean section are not at any higher risk for learning disabilities during the later part of life than children not delivered by C-section. These findings are published in the current issue of the journal Anesthesiology "We observed that the occurence rate of learning disabilities was equal between children who were delivered vaginally and those who were........Go to the OBGYN news blog (Added on 7/27/2009 10:48:27 PM)


Blood pressure drugs might protect against dementia

Blood pressure drugs might protect against dementia
A particular class of medicine used to treat hypertension could protect elderly adults against memory decline and other impairments in cognitive function, as per a newly published study from Wake Forest University School of Medicine. Research suggests that some of the drugs classified as angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, specifically those types of ACE inhibitors that affect the brain by crossing the blood-brain barrier, may........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 7/24/2009 12:01:54 AM)


One in Four Spanish women take antidepressants

One in FourSpanish women take antidepressants
Psychopharmaceutical use has risen over recent years. This is fact, but what is not clear is the reason why. Scientists from four Madrid-based health centres have shown that family conflict is not a significant factor. However, the results reported in the journal Atencin Primaria are striking: in Spain, 24% of women take antidepressants and more than 30% take tranquillisers. "The use of psychopharmaceuticals is often correlation to family or........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 7/23/2009 11:53:42 PM)


Weight guidelines for women pregnant with twins

Weight guidelines for women pregnant with twins
Healthy, normal-weight women pregnant with twins should gain between 37 and 54 pounds, as per research from a Michigan State University professor who helped shape the recently released national guidelines on gestational weight gain. Barbara Luke, a professor in the College of Human Medicine's Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology and Reproductive Biology and Department of Epidemiology, helped create the guidelines for the Institute of........Go to the OBGYN news blog (Added on 7/21/2009 11:18:14 PM)


Fighting disease atom by atom

Fighting disease atom by atom
Rice lab's atomic map of hepatitis E may reveal strategies to fight it. Scientists at Rice University and their international colleagues have for the first time described the atomic structure of the protein shell that carries the genetic code of hepatitis E (HEV). Their findings, reported in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, could mean that new ways to stop the virus may come in the not-too-distant future. Rice graduate........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 7/21/2009 10:53:06 PM)


Stem cells in sutures to enhance healing

Stem cells in sutures to enhance healing
Johns Hopkins biomedical engineering students have demonstrated a practical way to embed a patient's own adult stem cells in the surgical thread that doctors use to repair serious orthopedic injuries such as ruptured tendons. The goal, the students said, is to enhance healing and reduce the likelihood of re-injury without changing the surgical procedure itself. The project team -- 10 undergraduates sponsored by Bioactive Surgical Inc., a........Go to the Research news blog (Added on 7/20/2009 11:37:56 PM)


Why placebos work?

Why placebos work
Placebos are a sham commonly mere sugar pills designed to represent "no therapy" in a clinical therapy study. The effectiveness of the actual medicine is compared with the placebo to determine if the medicine works. And yet, for some people, the placebo works nearly as well as the medication. How well placebos work varies widely among individuals. Why that is so, and why they work at all, remains a mystery, believed to be based on some........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 7/20/2009 11:04:25 PM)


Edible coating makes fish filets longer-lasting, healthier

Edible coating makes fish filets longer-lasting, healthier
Consumers appears to be able to eat longer-lasting, potentially healthier fish fillets if research at Oregon State University makes its way to the supermarket. That's because OSU researchers have extended the shelf life of lingcod fillets and possibly made them more nutritious by dipping them into an edible, protective coating enriched with fish oil. "With this coating, you can easily keep the fillets in the display case for two to three........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 7/16/2009 11:56:16 PM)


Obesity and adolescents' social networks

Obesity and adolescents' social networks
Scientists from the Institute of Prevention Research at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California (USC) found in a recent study that overweight youth were twice as likely to have overweight friends. "Eventhough this link between obesity and social networks was expected, it was surprising how strong the peer effect is and how early in life it starts," says main author Thomas Valente, Ph.D., professor of preventive........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 7/16/2009 11:54:03 PM)


Bath time falls injure thousands of children

Bath time falls injure thousands of children
A new national study finds kids are being hurt in bathtubs and showers at a surprising rate.* You might think scalding or near drownings would be the most common threat in the bathroom, but they're not. Experts at Nationwide Children's Hospital say slips and falls are far more common, sending more than 43,000 kids a year to the emergency department. That's an average of 120 kids every day who are hurt in the tub or shower.* In most cases,........Go to the Pediatric news blog (Added on 7/14/2009 7:47:30 AM)


Promoting physical exercise in adults

Promoting physical exercise in adults
A study published this week in the open access journal PLoS Medicine has observed that of six interventions promoting exercise in adults in Australia, encouraging the use of pedometers simple step counting devices that can be used as a motivational tool and promoting physical activity through mass media campaigns are the most cost-effective in terms of the money spent for the health benefits they result in. Considered as a package, scientists........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 7/14/2009 7:45:46 AM)


Memory test and PET scans detect early signs of Alzheimer's

Memory test and PET scans detect early signs of Alzheimer's
A large study of patients with mild cognitive impairment revealed that results from cognitive tests and brain scans can work as an early warning system for the subsequent development of Alzheimer's disease. The research observed that among 85 participants in the study with mild cognitive impairment, those with low scores on a memory recall test and low glucose metabolism in particular brain regions, as detected through positron emission........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 7/14/2009 7:41:43 AM)


How staph infections alter immune system?

How staph infections alter immune system?
Infectious disease specialists at UT Southwestern Medical Center have mapped the gene profiles of children with severe Staphylococcus aureus infections, providing crucial insight into how the human immune system is programmed to respond to this pathogen and opening new doors for improved therapeutic interventions. In recent years, much research has focused on understanding precisely what the bacterium S aureus does within the host to........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 7/14/2009 7:39:27 AM)


New Alzheimer's disease treatment promising

New Alzheimer's disease treatment promising
Scientists at Mount Sinai School of Medicine have observed that a compound called NIC5-15, might be a safe and effective therapy to stabilize cognitive performance in patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease. The two investigators, Giulio Maria Pasinetti, M.D., Ph.D. , and Hillel Grossman, M.D., presented Phase IIA preliminary clinical findings at the Alzheimer's Association 2009 International Conference on Alzheimer's Disease (ICAD)........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 7/12/2009 8:46:26 AM)


Students with depression twice as likely to drop out of college

Students with depression twice as likely to drop out of college
College students with depression are twice as likely as their classmates to drop out of school, new research shows. However, the research also indicates that lower grade point averages depended upon a student's type of depression, as per Daniel Eisenberg, assistant professor in the University of Michigan School of Public Health and principal investigator of the study. There are two core symptoms of depression---loss of interest and........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 7/6/2009 7:45:57 PM)


How tamoxifen stimulates uterine cell growth and cancer

How tamoxifen stimulates uterine cell growth and cancer
UCSF scientists have identified a new "feed-forward" pathway linking estrogen receptors in the membrane of the uterus to a process that increases local estrogen levels and promotes cell growth. The research is significant in helping determine why tamoxifen and other synthetic estrogens are associated with increased rates of endometriosis and uterine cancer, and identifies a pathway that could be targeted in drug therapies for those diseases,........Go to the Breast-cancer-blog (Added on 7/2/2009 10:01:21 PM)


Remembering what to remember and what to forget

Remembering what to remember and what to forget
People in very early stages of Alzheimer's disease already have trouble focusing on what is important to remember, a UCLA psychology expert and his colleagues report. "One of the first telltale signs of Alzheimer's disease appears to be not memory problems, but failure to control attention," said Alan Castel, UCLA assistant professor of psychology and main author of the study. The study consisted of three groups: 109 healthy elderly........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 6/25/2009 7:18:37 PM)


More gene mutations linked to autism risk

More gene mutations linked to autism risk
More pieces in the complex autism inheritance puzzle are emerging in the latest study from a research team including geneticists from The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine and several collaborating institutions. This study identified 27 different genetic regions where rare copy number variations missing or extra copies of DNA segments were found in the genes of children with autism spectrum........Go to the Pediatric news blog (Added on 6/25/2009 6:01:42 PM)


Underweight and extremely obese die earlier

Underweight and extremely obese die earlier
Underweight people and those who are extremely obese die earlier than people of normal weightbut those who are overweight actually live longer than people of normal weight. Those are the findings of a newly released study published online in Obesity by scientists at Statistics Canada, Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Research, Portland State University, Oregon Health & Science University, and McGill University. "It's not surprising that........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 6/23/2009 5:13:53 PM)


New therapy to prevent heart failure

New therapy to prevent heart failure
A landmark study has successfully demonstrated a 29 percent reduction in heart failure or death in patients with heart disease who received an implanted cardiac resynchronization treatment device with defibrillator (CRT-D) versus patients who received only an implanted cardiac defibrillator (ICD-only). MADIT-CRT (Multicenter Automatic Defibrillator Implantation Trial with Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy) is a clinical trial that enrolled........Go to the Heart-watch-blog (Added on 6/23/2009 5:11:02 PM)


 

Testing trauma cases for blood alcohol levels

Testing trauma cases for blood alcohol levels
New findings show that testing for blood alcohol levels (BALs) can identify high-risk patients, even if they previously denied excessive drinking, and help to predict alcohol-related health complications. Too much alcohol often causes trauma, complicates evaluation of injury, and interferes with inpatient care. Even though 20 to 37 percent of accident cases in trauma centers are alcohol-related, some trauma patients are reluctant to self........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 7/24/2009 12:04:32 AM)


The Sea food and 'See food' diet

The Sea food and  'See food' diet
Current research suggests that a diet high in omega-3 fatty acids may help prevent one of the leading causes of legal blindness among the elderly. The related report by Tuo et al, "A high omega-3 fatty acid diet reduces retinal lesions in a murine model of macular degeneration," appears in the August 2009 issue of the American Journal of Pathology Age-related macular degeneration (AMD), loss of vision in the center of the visual field........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 7/23/2009 11:57:48 PM)


Injection reverses heart-attack damage

Injection reverses heart-attack damage
Injured heart tissue normally can't regrow, but scientists at Children's Hospital Boston have now laid the groundwork for regenerating heart tissue after a heart attack, in patients with heart failure, or in children with congenital heart defects. In the July 24 issue of Cell, they show that a growth factor called neuregulin1 (NRG1), which is involved in the initial development of the heart and nervous system, can spur heart-muscle growth and........Go to the Heart-watch-blog (Added on 7/23/2009 11:55:50 PM)


New insights into the causes of anorexia

New insights into the causes of anorexia
New imaging technology provides insight into abnormalities in the brain circuitry of patients with anorexia nervosa (usually known as anorexia) that may contribute to the puzzling symptoms found in people with the eating disorder. In a review paper published on line in Nature Reviews Neuroscience, Walter Kaye, MD, professor of psychiatry and director of the Eating Disorders Program at the University of California, San Diego, and his colleagues........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 7/21/2009 11:21:11 PM)


Gene that leads to breast cancer's aggressive behavior

Gene that leads to breast cancer's aggressive behavior
Aggressive forms of cancer are often driven by the abnormal over-expression of cancer-promoting genes, also known as oncogenes. Studies at the Genome Institute of Singapore (GIS), a research institute under the Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR) of Singapore, have identified a gene, known as RCP (or RAB11FIP1), that is frequently amplified and over-expressed in breast cancer and functionally contributes to aggressive breast........Go to the Breast-cancer-blog (Added on 7/20/2009 11:40:52 PM)


Insights into failed HIV-1 vaccine trial

Insights into failed HIV-1 vaccine trial
Following the disbandment of the STEP trial to test the efficacy of the Merck HIV-1 vaccine candidate in 2007, the leading explanation for why the vaccine was ineffective and may have even increased susceptibility to acquiring the virus centered on the hypothesis that high levels of baseline Ad5-specific neutralizing antibodies may have increased HIV-1 acquisition among the study subjects who received the vaccine by increasing Ad5-specific........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 7/20/2009 11:39:16 PM)


Secondhand smoke exposure among college students

Secondhand smoke exposure among college students
Secondhand smoke (SHS) is not only a nuisance, but a potential health concern for a number of college students, and administrators should be taking steps to reduce students' exposure, as per a newly released study by scientists at Wake Forest University School of Medicine. It is the first study to provide evidence of the high rates of SHS exposure, and correlates of exposure, among college students in the United States. Funded by the........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 7/20/2009 11:13:20 PM)


Heavy alcohol consumption and risk of prostate cancer

Heavy alcohol consumption and risk of prostate cancer
Consumption of 50 g or more of alcohol per day or four or more drinks per day for at least five days per week was linked to an elevated risk for prostate cancer. Furthermore, drinking 50 g or more of alcohol per day rendered therapy with finasteride ineffective. Scientists analyzed data from 2,129 participants with cancer and 8,791 participants without disease from the Prostate Cancer Prevention Trial. They examined the relationships between........Go to the Prostate-cancer-blog (Added on 7/20/2009 10:58:39 PM)


Understanding of DNA repair mechanism could lead to better cancer drugs

Understanding of DNA repair mechanism could lead to better cancer drugs
Scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have shed new light on a process that fixes breaks in the genetic material of the body's cells. Their findings could lead to ways of enhancing chemotherapy drugs that destroy cancer cells by damaging their DNA. Using yeast cells, the researchers studied protein molecules that have an important role in homologous recombination, which is one way that cells repair breaks in the........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 7/16/2009 11:50:20 PM)


Hospital software improves patient satisfaction

Hospital software improves patient satisfaction
When hospitalists use discharge communication software, patients and the outpatient doctors who carry out the care have better perceptions of the quality of the discharge process, as per new research reported in the recent issue of the Journal of Hospital Medicine The scientists go on to say that hospitalists are satisfied that the software works, eventhough they find the systems more difficult to use than the paper based methods they are........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 7/16/2009 11:44:46 PM)


Reminder program dramatically increases mammography rates

Reminder program dramatically increases mammography rates
A reminder program aimed at screening for breast cancer when it is most treatable boosted mammography rates by more than 17 percentage points, as per a newly released study by Kaiser Permanente's Center for Health Research in the recent issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine The program used electronic health records to identify women who would soon be due for a mammogram and reached out to them via postcards, automated voice........Go to the Breast-cancer-blog (Added on 7/14/2009 7:44:09 AM)


Obesity contributes to rapid cartilage loss

Obesity contributes to rapid cartilage loss
Obesity, among other factors, is strongly linked to an increased risk of rapid cartilage loss, as per a research studyreported in the recent issue of Radiology "We have isolated demographic and MRI-based risk factors for progressive cartilage loss," said the study's main author, Frank W. Roemer, M.D., adjunct associate professor at Boston University and co-director of the Quantitative Imaging Center at the Department of Radiology at Boston........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 7/14/2009 7:42:40 AM)


Simulating medical situations helps students learn

Simulating medical situations helps students learn
Simulating medical scenarios helps medical students learn and retain vital information, as per a newly released study done by scientists at Wake Forest University School of Medicine. The study, recently published in Medical Teacher, shows that medical students not only enjoy patient-simulation experiences but also learn more from them, said Michael T. Fitch, M.D., Ph.D., the senior author of the paper and an associate professor of emergency........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 7/14/2009 7:37:22 AM)


MRI may help accurately diagnose dementia patients

MRI may help accurately diagnose dementia patients
A new Mayo Clinic study may help physicians differentially diagnose three common neurodegenerative disorders in the future. The study will be presented at the Alzheimer's Association International Conference on Alzheimer's Disease on July 11 in Vienna. In this study, Mayo Clinic scientists developed a framework for MRI-based differential diagnosis of three common neurodegenerative disorders: Alzheimer's disease, frontotemporal lobar........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 7/11/2009 1:14:31 PM)


Overweight Kids Experience More Loneliness

Overweight Kids Experience More Loneliness
As childhood obesity rates continue to increase, experts agree that more information is needed about the implications of being overweight as a step toward reversing current trends. Now, a new University of Missouri study has observed that overweight children, particularly girls, show signs of the negative consequences of being overweight as early as kindergarten. "We observed that both boys and girls who were overweight from kindergarten........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 7/4/2009 10:58:04 PM)


Prostate cancer patients who are disease free after 5 years

Prostate cancer patients who are disease free after 5 years
Patients with prostate cancer who receive brachytherapy and remain free of disease for five years or greater are unlikely to have a recurrence at 10 years, as per a research studyin the July 1 issue of the International Journal of Radiation Oncology*Biology*Physics, the official journal of the American Society for Radiation Oncology (ASTRO). Brachytherapy is the placement of radioactive sources in or just next to a tumor either permanently........Go to the Prostate-cancer-blog (Added on 7/4/2009 10:56:19 PM)


Big Tobacco dead by 2047

Big Tobacco dead by 2047
President Barack Obama's signature on a bill this week to grant the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) regulatory authority over tobacco was historic, and represents a step in the march to eliminate tobacco use in this country by 2047, two national tobacco experts said today (June 25). The pair published "Stealing a March in the 21st Century: Accelerating Progress in the 100-Year War Against Tobacco Addiction in the United States" in the........Go to the Lung-cancer-blog (Added on 6/25/2009 6:49:07 PM)


Selenium intake may worsen prostate cancer

Selenium intake may worsen prostate cancer
Higher selenium levels in the blood may worsen prostate cancer in some men who already have the disease, as per a research studyby scientists at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute the University of California, San Francisco. A higher risk of more-aggressive prostate cancer was seen in men with a certain genetic variant found in about 75 percent of the patients with prostate cancer in the study. In those subjects, having a high level of selenium in........Go to the Prostate-cancer-blog (Added on 6/25/2009 6:06:20 PM)


MRI for imaging breast cancer?

MRI for imaging breast cancer?
Reviewing the records of 577 patients with breast cancer, Fox Chase Cancer Center scientists observed that women with newly diagnosed breast cancer who receive a breast MRI are more likely to receive a mastectomy after their diagnosis and may face delays in starting therapy. The study demonstrates that, despite the lack of evidence of their benefit, routine use of MRI scans in women newly diagnosed with breast cancer increased significantly........Go to the Breast-cancer-blog (Added on 6/25/2009 5:53:52 PM)


Morning people and night owls

Morning people and night owls
Are you a "morning person" or a "night owl?". Researchers at the University of Alberta have observed that there are significant differences in the way our brains function depending on whether we're early risers or night owls. Neuroresearchers in the Faculty of Physical Education and Recreation looked at two groups of people: those who wake up early and feel most productive in the morning, and those who were identified as evening people,........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 6/23/2009 5:08:59 PM)


 

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Cancer terms:
Oncologist: Physician or surgeon who had specialized in the treatment of cancer. Medical oncologists usually treat patients with chemotherapy, hormonal therapy and biological therapy, radiation oncologists treat cancer with radiation therapy and surgical oncologists treat patients with surgery. See cancer terms for more cancer related terms.

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