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Abnormal cells in blood and lung cancer

Abnormal cells in blood and lung cancer
A novel approach detects genetically abnormal cells in the blood of non-small cell patients with lung cancer that match abnormalities found in tumor cells and increase in number with the severity of the disease, a research team led by researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center report in the journal Clinical Cancer Research Patients with lung cancer in the study also had a number of times the number of these circulating........Go to the Lung-cancer-blog (Added on 7/23/2010 7:03:54 AM)


Sugar substitutes help reduce caloric intake

Sugar substitutes help reduce caloric intake
A newly released study reported in the August 2010 journal, Appetite, further demonstrates that people who consume low-calorie sweeteners are able to significantly reduce their caloric intake and do not overeat. In fact, study participants who received the sugar substitutes instead of sugar consumed significantly fewer calories and there was no difference in hunger levels despite having fewer calories overall. The scientists noted, "In........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 7/23/2010 6:59:45 AM)


Chili pepper ingredient fights fat

Chili pepper ingredient fights fat
Capsaicin, the stuff that gives chili peppers their kick, may cause weight loss and fight fat buildup by triggering certain beneficial protein changes in the body, as per a newly released study on the topic. The report, which could lead to new therapys for obesity, appears in ACS' monthly Journal of Proteome Research Jong Won Yun and his colleagues point out that obesity is a major public health threat worldwide, associated with diabetes,........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 7/22/2010 7:39:09 AM)


Chaos theory help predict heart attacks

Chaos theory help predict heart attacks
Chaos models may someday help model cardiac arrhythmias -- abnormal electrical rhythms of the heart, say scientists in the journal CHAOS, which is published by the American Institute of Physics. In recent years, medical research has drawn more attention to chaos in cardiac dynamics. Eventhough chaos marks the disorder of a dynamical system, locating the origin of chaos and watching it develop might allow scientists to predict, and maybe even........Go to the Heart-watch-blog (Added on 7/22/2010 7:34:02 AM)


Protection against ticks that carry Lyme disease

Protection against ticks that carry Lyme disease
Research on the population of black-legged ticks, which can transmit Lyme disease from host animals to humans, reinforces that it is important to take preventative measures when spending time outdoors. University of Illinois graduate student Jennifer Rydzewski conducted a four-year survey of black-legged ticks (also known as deer ticks), their host animals, and their habitat preferences in Cook, Lake, DuPage, and Piatt Counties. The survey........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 7/21/2010 6:08:23 AM)


Depression overlooked in patients with hepatitis C

Depression overlooked in patients with hepatitis C
Scientists from Denmark, Sweden, Norway and Finland (the NORDynamIC project group) have found that depressive symptoms in patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection are usually overlooked in routine clinical interviews, and that therapy-induced depression compromises the outcome of HCV treatment. A second U.S. study observed that patients with chronic infection had lower (work) productivity and incurred higher medical benefit costs than........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 7/21/2010 6:05:13 AM)


Common medications may cause cognitive impairment

Common medications may cause cognitive impairment
Drugs commonly taken for a variety of common medical conditions including insomnia, allergies, or incontinence negatively affect the brain causing long term cognitive impairment in older African-Americans, according to a study appearing in the July 13, 2010 print issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. These drugs, called anticholinergics, block acetylcholine, a nervous system neurotransmitter, and are........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 7/14/2010 7:46:58 AM)


Superstition Might Improve Performance

Superstition Might Improve Performance
Don't scoff at those lucky rabbit feet. New research shows that having some kind of lucky token can actually improve your performance - by increasing your self-confidence. "I watch a lot of sports, and I read about sports, and I noticed that very often athletes - also famous athletes - hold superstitions," says Lysann Damisch of the University of Cologne. Michael Jordan wore his college team shorts underneath his NBA uniform for good luck;........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 7/14/2010 7:43:49 AM)


New vitamin D intake guidelines

New vitamin D intake guidelines
New and updated guidelines on recommended vitamin D intake have been published this week in the online issue of the Canadian Medical Association Journal (CMAJ). Dr. David Hanley, professor at the University of Calgary Faculty of Medicine, and member of Osteoporosis Canada's (OC) Scientific Advisory Council, is the main author of the paper on behalf of Osteoporosis Canada. "OC's current recommendations on vitamin D intake for Canadians are........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 7/14/2010 7:11:34 AM)


How prostate cancer packs a punch

How prostate cancer packs a punch
Some types of prostate tumors are more aggressive and more likely to metastasize than others. Nearly one-third of these aggressive tumors contain a small nest of particularly dangerous cells known as neuroendocrine-type cells. More rarely, some aggressive prostate tumors are made up entirely of neuroendocrine-type cells. The presence of neuroendocrine-type cancer cells is linked to a poor prognosis, but spotting these rare cells can be like........Go to the Prostate-cancer-blog (Added on 7/13/2010 7:23:43 AM)


Could our minds be tricked into satisfying our stomachs?

Could our minds be tricked into satisfying our stomachs?
Research to be presented at the Annual Meeting of the Society for the Study of Ingestive Behavior (SSIB), the foremost society for research into all aspects of eating and drinking behavior, suggests that the key to losing weight could lie in manipulating our beliefs about how filling we think food will be before we eat it, suggesting that portion control is all a matter of perception. Test subjects were more satisfied for longer periods of........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 7/13/2010 7:02:45 AM)


Quality of sleep in head and neck cancer patients

Quality of sleep in head and neck cancer patients
Head and neck cancer patients who reported poor sleep quality one year after diagnosis had more symptoms of chronic pain and complaints of dry mouth correlation to radiation therapys, as per a recent study from the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center. Because these side effects can be controlled or modified, the study suggests that reducing these factors in head and neck cancer patients appears to be warranted to improve sleep........Go to the ENT news blog (Added on 7/12/2010 6:45:32 AM)


How to slow growth of malignant melanoma?

How to slow growth of malignant melanoma?
New Queen's University research has shown that the growth of melanoma, one of the most deadly forms of skin cancer, can be slowed when a little known gene called MicroRNA 193b is added. Victor Tron, head of pathology and molecular medicine, focused on miR-193b when he discovered that it was deficient in melanoma tumors and because there were very few studies done about the gene. The miRNA-193b gene is found in people's DNA and was unknown........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 7/9/2010 7:28:59 AM)


What's your baseline PSA?

What's your baseline PSA?
Men who have a baseline PSA value of 10 or higher the first time they are tested are up to 11 times more likely to die from prostate cancer than are men with lower initial values, as per Duke University Medical Center researchers. Researchers say the finding, appearing early online in the journal Cancer, supports routine, early prostate-specific antigen (PSA) screening among healthy men with normal life expectancy a practice several........Go to the Prostate-cancer-blog (Added on 7/9/2010 6:57:50 AM)


Changing the cancer cell to respond to tamoxifen

Changing the cancer cell to respond to tamoxifen
Using a small molecule decoy, researchers funded by the Samuel Waxman Cancer Research Foundation have managed to block protein interactions and induce epigenetic reprogramming in human and mouse breast cancer cells, essentially changing the gene expression of breast cancer cells to behave in a more normal manner. The research illustrates what may perhaps become an effective targeted epigenetic treatment in breast cancer. Interestingly, the........Go to the Breast-cancer-blog (Added on 7/9/2010 6:55:19 AM)


Inactivity and childhood obesity epidemic

Inactivity and childhood obesity epidemic
A new report from the EarlyBird Diabetes Study suggests that physical activity has little if any role to play in the obesity epidemic among children. Obesity is the key factor behind diabetes, heart disease and some cancers. EarlyBird is based at the Peninsula Medical School in Plymouth, UK, and has been observing in detail a cohort of city school children for the past 11 years. A review published in 2009 of all trials using physical........Go to the Pediatric news blog (Added on 7/8/2010 6:45:16 AM)


Should specialist medical training be more flexible?

Should specialist medical training be more flexible?
Specialist medical training programmes should retain some flexibility to help trainee doctors make the right career choices, as per a research studypublished on bmj.com today. Some UK medical graduates choose a specialty as soon as they qualify and others after a few years of postgraduate work. But changes to postgraduate medical training mean that junior doctors will generally have to make choices sooner than in the past. This concern........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 7/7/2010 7:28:57 AM)


It takes more than antioxidants to slow aging

It takes more than antioxidants to slow aging
Don't put down the red wine and vitamins just yet, but if you're taking antioxidants because you hope to live longer, consider this: a newly released study reported in the June 2010 issue of the journal GENETICS (http://www.genetics.org) casts doubt on the theory that oxidative stress to our tissues shortens lifespan. That's because scientists from McGill University in Canada have identified mutations in 10 different genes of worms (genes........Go to the Research news blog (Added on 7/7/2010 7:26:14 AM)


Proteins that regulate blood pressure

Proteins that regulate blood pressure
Scientists at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine have identified key players in a little-known biochemical pathway that appears to regulate blood pressure. The findings, published in the early online version of Cardiovascular Research, have evolved from studies conducted by Jeffrey S. Isenberg, M.D., Eileen M. Bauer, Ph.D., and their colleagues at Pitt's Vascular Medicine Institute. "Identifying and unraveling this important........Go to the Heart-watch-blog (Added on 7/7/2010 6:51:19 AM)


Protein associated with Alzheimer's disease

Protein associated with Alzheimer's disease
Higher concentrations of clusterin, a protein in the blood plasma, may be linked to the development, severity and progression of Alzheimer's disease, as per a report in the recent issue of Archives of General Psychiatry, one of the JAMA/Archives journals. Individuals with Alzheimer's disease display several findings in their blood and cerebrospinal fluid that may reflect neuropathological changes, as per background information in the........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 7/6/2010 7:18:25 AM)


 

African ancestry linked to high-risk breast cancer

African ancestry linked to high-risk breast cancer
A newly released study finds that African ancestry is associated with triple-negative breast cancer, a more aggressive type of cancer that has fewer therapy options. Scientists at the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center observed that, among women with breast cancer, 82 percent of African women were triple negative, 26 percent of African-Americans were and 16 percent of white Americans were. Triple negative breast cancer is........Go to the Breast-cancer-blog (Added on 7/23/2010 7:06:29 AM)


Summer reading keeps skills strong

Summer reading keeps skills strong
To children, the summer slide means water, garden hoses and slippery plastic sheets. To teachers, the "summer slide" is the noted decrease in reading skills after a vacation without books. University of Tennessee, Knoxville, faculty members Richard Allington and Anne McGill-Franzen have completed a three-year study showing a significantly higher level of reading achievement in students who received books for summer reading at home. Allington........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 7/22/2010 7:42:35 AM)


How safe and effective are herbal dietary supplements?

How safe and effective are herbal dietary supplements?
Millions of people are taking herbs and other plant-based dietary supplements to improve their health, but they have precious little information on the actual effectiveness or potential ill effects of these products. That's the topic of an article in the current issue of Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), ACS' weekly newsmagazine. C&EN Senior Editor Celia Henry Arnaud suggests that consumers are taking a gamble when it comes to the safety........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 7/22/2010 7:36:30 AM)


Key pathway in end-stage prostate cancer blocked

Key pathway in end-stage prostate cancer blocked
Prostate cancer advances when tumors become resistant to hormone treatment, which is the standard therapy for patients, and begin producing their own androgens. Scientists at UT Southwestern Medical Center have observed that blocking one of the enzymatic steps that allow the tumor to produce androgens could be the key in halting a tumor's growth. The findings, appearing online and in the recent issue of Endocrinology, suggest that this........Go to the Prostate-cancer-blog (Added on 7/21/2010 6:11:30 AM)


Children's school performance tied to family "type"

Children's school performance tied to family
The way a family interacts can have more of an impact on a child's predicted school success than reading, writing or arithmetic, as per a University of Notre Dame study published recently in the Journal of Child Development. University of Notre Dame Professor of Psychology Mark Cummings and his colleagues at the University of Rochester studied the relationship patterns of some 300 families (with six year-olds) over the course of three years,........Go to the Pediatric news blog (Added on 7/21/2010 6:10:07 AM)


Behavior Problems in School

Behavior Problems in School
Contrary to Leo Tolstoy's famous observation that "happy families are all alike; every unhappy family is unhappy in its own way," a new psychology study confirms that unhappy families, in fact, are unhappy in two distinct ways. And these dual patterns of unhealthy family relationships lead to a host of specific difficulties for children during their early school years. "Families can be a support and resource for children as they enter........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 7/16/2010 7:20:21 AM)


Not Getting Enough vitamin D

Not Getting Enough vitamin D
Vitamin D surfaces as a news topic every few months. How much daily vitamin D should a person get? Is it possible to have too much of it? Is exposure to the sun, which is the body's natural way of producing vitamin D, the best option? Or do supplements suffice?. In the July 2010 issue of Endocrine Today, a monthly newspaper published by SLACK, Inc., to disseminate information about diabetes and endocrine disorders, Anthony Norman, a........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 7/16/2010 7:07:18 AM)


Interferon for asthma

Interferon for asthma
An immune-system protein already used to treat diseases like multiple sclerosis, hepatitis C and a variety of cancers might also aid asthma patients, UT Southwestern Medical Center scientists have found. The researchers determined that the protein interferon blocks the development of a population of immune cells known to cause asthma. These cells are members of a class of T lymphocytes, called T helper 2 cells, or Th2 cells. Under normal........Go to the Allergy news blog (Added on 7/14/2010 7:24:54 AM)


Smoking influences gene function

Smoking influences gene function
In the largest study of its kind, scientists at the Southwest Foundation for Biomedical Research (SFBR) have observed that exposure to cigarette smoke can alter gene expression -- the process by which a gene's information is converted into the structures and functions of a cell. These alterations in response to smoking appear to have a wide-ranging negative influence on the immune system, and a strong involvement in processes correlation to........Go to the Research news blog (Added on 7/14/2010 7:13:38 AM)


New Approach For Diabetes Therapy

New Approach For Diabetes Therapy
Nutrition experts at Oregon State University have essentially "cured" laboratory mice of mild, diet-induced diabetes by stimulating the production of a particular enzyme. The findings could offer a new approach to diabetes treatment, experts say, particularly if a drug could be identified that would do the same thing, which in this case was accomplished with genetic manipulation. Increased levels of this enzyme, called fatty acid........Go to the Diabetes-watch-blog (Added on 7/13/2010 7:21:20 AM)


Men who are obese at age 20 two times risk of death

Men who are obese at age 20 two times risk of death
Stockholm, Sweden: Men who enter adult life obese face a life-long doubling of the risk of dying prematurely, new research has found. In a study presented today (Tuesday) at the International Congress on Obesity in Stockholm, scientists tracked more than 5,000 military conscripts starting at the age of 20 until up to the age of 80. They observed that at any given age, an obese man was twice as likely to die as a man who was not obese and........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 7/13/2010 6:51:00 AM)


Many popular slimming supplements do not work

Many popular slimming supplements do not work
New research evaluating the effectiveness of a broad selection of popular slimming supplements sold in pharmacies and health food shops has found no evidence that any of them facilitate weight loss beyond the placebo effect. Two studies presented today (Monday) at the International Congress on Obesity in Stockholm, Sweden, have found they were no more effective than the fake supplements they were compared with. "There are scores of........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 7/12/2010 6:49:20 AM)


Happier youths are also healthier youths

Happier youths are also healthier youths
Happier youths are also healthier youths, as per Emily Shaffer-Hudkins and her team, from the University of South Florida in the US. Adolescents' positive emotions and moods, as well as their satisfaction with life, could be more important than their anxiety or depression levels for predicting their physical health, they argue. Looking at teenagers' so-called 'subjective well-being' could help identify those likely to develop health problems in........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 7/9/2010 7:22:18 AM)


Vitamin B3 to treat fungal infections

Vitamin B3 to treat fungal infections
A team of researchers from the Institute for Research in Immunology and Cancer (IRIC) of the University of Montreal have identified vitamin B3 as a potential antifungal therapy. Led by IRIC Principal Investigators Martine Raymond, Alain Verreault and Pierre Thibault, in collaboration with Alaka Mullick, from the Biotechnology Research Institute of the National Research Council Canada, the study is the subject of a recent article in Nature........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 7/9/2010 7:00:33 AM)


Teens drink more during summer before college

Teens drink more during summer before college
Summertime and the living is easy. But not too easy for parents whose children will head to college in the fall. University of Rhode Island Psychology Professor Mark Wood, a nationally recognized alcohol researcher, wants parents to be aware that this is a time when teens tend to increase their alcohol consumption. The URI expert advises parents to monitor their children--know where they are, whom they are with and what they are doing. ........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 7/8/2010 7:01:14 AM)


Higher-protein diets support weight loss

Higher-protein diets support weight loss
Overweight and moderately obese postmenopausal women using diets based on higher protein intake also need to be aware of potential bone loss, as per new research from Purdue University. "We know that when overweight, postmenopausal women reduce their energy intake to successfully lose weight, they can lose less lean body mass when they consume higher amounts of protein and include lean meats, such as pork loins, ham, beef and chicken, in........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 7/8/2010 6:57:39 AM)


Fish oil may reduce risk of breast cancer

Fish oil may reduce risk of breast cancer
A recent report in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research, adds to the growing evidence that fish oil supplements may play a role in preventing chronic disease. Scientists at the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center in Seattle, Wash., led by Emily White, Ph.D., a member of the public health sciences division, asked 35,016 postmenopausal women who did not have a history of........Go to the Breast-cancer-blog (Added on 7/8/2010 6:43:57 AM)


How patients manage chronic lower-back pain

How patients manage chronic lower-back pain
Approximately 10% of low back pain (LBP) sufferers experience persistent pain and significant disability. As per a research findings reported in the recent issue of Pain, a group of Australian scientists investigating the relevance of health literacy in patients with chronic lower back pain (CLBP) observed that LBP-related beliefs and behaviors affect a person's disability more than pain intensity or a standard measure of functional health........Go to the Rheumatology news blog (Added on 7/7/2010 6:52:52 AM)


New tool to rule out coronary heart disease

New tool to rule out coronary heart disease
A simple new rule can help primary care physicians rule out coronary heart disease in patients with chest pain, states a study published in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) (pre-embargo link only) http://www.cmaj.ca/embargo/cmaj100212.pdf. Chest pain is common, yet it is challenging for primary care physicians to reliably identify serious cardiac disease while protecting patients from unnecessary interventions. The authors........Go to the Heart-watch-blog (Added on 7/6/2010 7:21:52 AM)


Kids now see more ads for fast food

Kids now see more ads for fast food
Children saw fewer television advertisements for certain foods, including those for sweets and beverages, in 2007 compared with 2003, as per a report posted online today that will appear in the September print issue of Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals. However, children now see more fast-food ads, and racial gaps in exposure to all food advertising have increased. An Institute of Medicine (IOM)........Go to the Pediatric news blog (Added on 7/6/2010 7:19:39 AM)


 

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Cancer terms:
Oncologist: Physician or surgeon who had specialized in the treatment of cancer. Medical oncologists usually treat patients with chemotherapy, hormonal therapy and biological therapy, radiation oncologists treat cancer with radiation therapy and surgical oncologists treat patients with surgery. See cancer terms for more cancer related terms.

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