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Taking dex can improve high altitude exercise capacity

Taking dex can improve high altitude exercise capacity
Taking dexamathasone prophlyactically may improve exercise capacity in some mountaineers, as per Swiss researchers. Dexamathasone, known popularly to climbers as "dex," has been used for years to treat altitude-related symptoms in mountaineers, but has never been tested for its ability to improve exercise capacity at high altitude. "We have known that both tadalafil and dexamethasone are good for preventing high altitude pulmonary edema........Go to the Research news blog (Added on 8/11/2009 11:19:35 PM)


Oxygen treatment hastens memory loss

Oxygen treatment hastens memory loss
A 65-year-old women goes into the hospital for routine hip surgery. Six months later, she develops memory loss and is later diagnosed with Alzheimer's Disease. Just a coincidence? Scientists at the University of South Florida and Vanderbilt University don't think so. They suspect that the culprit precipitating Alzheimer's disease in the elderly women appears to be a routine administration of high concentrations of oxygen for several hours........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 8/11/2009 11:13:25 PM)


Powerful new therapy for asthma

Powerful new therapy for asthma
University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston scientists have observed that a single enzyme is apparently critical to most allergen-provoked asthma attacks and that activity of the enzyme, known as aldose reductase, can be significantly reduced by compounds that have already undergone clinical trials as therapys for complications of diabetes. The discovery, made in experiments conducted with mice and in human cell cultures, opens the way........Go to the Allergy news blog (Added on 8/11/2009 11:10:47 PM)


The tourist trap

The tourist trap
Mosquitoes with the potential to carry diseases lethal to a number of unique species of Galapagos wildlife are being regularly introduced to the islands via aircraft, as per new research published recently. The southern house mosquito, Culex quinquefasciatus, was previously thought to have been introduced to the Galapagos in a one-off event in the mid-1980s. However, researchers from the University of Leeds, the Zoological Society of........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 8/11/2009 11:06:28 PM)


Tumor mutations can predict chemo success

Tumor mutations can predict chemo success
New work by MIT cancer biologists shows that the interplay between two key genes that are often defective in tumors determines how cancer cells respond to chemotherapy. The findings should have an immediate impact on cancer therapy, say Michael Hemann and Michael Yaffe, the two MIT biology professors who led the study. The work could help doctors predict what types of chemotherapy will be effective in a particular tumor, which would help........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 8/6/2009 11:35:53 PM)


Noninsulin-producing alpha cells in the pancreas

Noninsulin-producing alpha cells in the pancreas
In findings that add to the prospects of regenerating insulin-producing cells in people with type 1 diabetes, scientists in Europe -- co-funded by the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation -- have shown that insulin-producing beta cells can be derived from non-insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. In results of a study published recently in the journal Cell, the researchers, led by Patrick Collombat of the Max-Planck Institute for........Go to the Diabetes-watch-blog (Added on 8/6/2009 11:29:38 PM)


How you eat may be just as important as how much you eat

How you eat may be just as important as how much you eat
How you eat appears to be just as important as how much you eat, if mice studies are any clue. Cancer scientists have long studied the role of diet on breast cancer risk, but results to date have been mixed. New findings published in Cancer Prevention Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research, suggest the method by which calories are restricted appears to be more important for cancer protection than the actual........Go to the Breast-cancer-blog (Added on 8/4/2009 8:25:19 AM)


Brain difference in psychopaths identified

Brain difference in psychopaths identified
Professor Declan Murphy and his colleagues Dr Michael Craig and Dr Marco Catani from the Institute of Psychiatry at King's College London have found differences in the brain which may provide a biological explanation for psychopathy. The results of their study are outlined in the paper 'Altered connections on the road to psychopathy', published in Molecular Psychiatry The research investigated the brain biology of psychopaths with........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 8/4/2009 8:06:42 AM)


Lung cancer patients respond to erlotinib following cetuximab therapy

Lung cancer patients respond to erlotinib following cetuximab therapy
Non-small cell patients with lung cancer who have progressed on a cetuximab-containing regimen may respond to erlotinib, Fox Chase Cancer Center scientists reported today at the annual meeting of the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer. Both cetuximab (Erbitux) and erlotinib (Tarceva) inhibit the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and the assumption has been that once a patient progresses on one EGFR inhibitor they........Go to the Lung cancer news blog (Added on 8/2/2009 11:04:33 PM)


Poor sleep in children may have prenatal origins

Poor sleep in children may have prenatal origins
Westchester, Ill. A study in the Aug.1 issue of the journal SLEEP observed that alcohol consumption during pregnancy and small body size at birth predict poorer sleep and higher risk of sleep disturbances in 8-year-old children born at term. Findings are clinically significant, as poor sleep and sleep disturbances in children are linked to obesity, depressive symptoms, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, and poor neurobehavioral........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 8/2/2009 11:02:32 PM)


Gas gauge to prevent pregnancy loss

Gas gauge to prevent pregnancy loss
New Haven, Conn. To combat the a number of fetal deaths that occur annually because the placenta is too small, scientists at Yale School of Medicine have developed a method to measure the volume of the placenta, which provides nourishment to the fetus. Limits in current technology keep doctors from being able to monitor the growth of the placenta, which, like the gas tank of a car, is the source of fuel for the fetus. The placenta can be so........Go to the OBGYN news blog (Added on 8/2/2009 11:00:06 PM)


Summer heat increases risk of amniotic fluid level deficiency

Summer heat increases risk of amniotic fluid level deficiency
BEER-SHEVA, ISRAEL -- July 30, 2009 Pregnant women have a higher occurence rate of insufficient amniotic fluid levels (oligohydramnios) in the summer months due to dehydration, as per a research studyconducted by scientists at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU). The retrospective population-based study was reported in the recent issue of Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics The main objective of the study was to determine whether........Go to the OBGYN news blog (Added on 7/31/2009 12:21:10 AM)


Got migraines?

Got migraines?
Migraine headaches are a drain not only on the estimated 30 million Americans who suffer from them, but on the economy, too. Because pain and other symptoms caused by migraine headaches can be quite severe, it is projected that nearly $13 billion is spent every year in headache therapy and loss of time from work, which no one can afford these days. But as per a newly released study in Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, the official medical........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 7/31/2009 12:16:55 AM)


Chemo directly to ovarian cancer cells

Chemo directly to ovarian cancer cells
With a novel therapeutic delivery system, a research team led by researchers at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center has successfully targeted a protein that is over-expressed in ovary cancer cells. Using the EphA2 protein as a molecular homing mechanism, chemotherapy was delivered in a highly selective manner in preclinical models of ovary cancer, the scientists report in the July 29 issue of the Journal of the National Cancer........Go to the Ovarian cancer blog (Added on 7/29/2009 11:15:32 PM)


Mothers need infant feeding information

Mothers need infant feeding information
A systematic literature review of mothers' experiences with bottle-feeding observed that while mothers recognize the benefits of breastfeeding, those who bottle-feed with infant formula do not receive adequate information and support from their healthcare providers and thus, ultimately put their baby's health at risk. "While it is important to promote breastfeeding," the authors conclude, "it is also necessary to ensure that the needs of........Go to the OBGYN news blog (Added on 7/29/2009 11:12:15 PM)


Immune responses to flu vaccine

Immune responses to flu vaccine
Patients with the autoimmune disease systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) have an increased risk of infection, due to both disturbances in their immune responses and therapy with immunosuppressive drugs. Because morbidity and mortality correlation to influenza are increased in immunocompromised patients, it is recommended that patients with SLE get annual flu shots, which are safe and do not increase disease activity. Both antibody and........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 7/29/2009 11:07:19 PM)


Pesticides linked to childhood cancer

Pesticides linked to childhood cancer
Washington, DC A newly released study by scientists at the Georgetown's Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center finds a higher level of common household pesticides in the urine of children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), a cancer that develops most usually between three and seven years of age. The findings are published in the recent issue of the journal Therapeutic Drug Monitoring Scientists caution that these findings should not be........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 7/28/2009 11:39:52 PM)


New Drug for Children with High-Risk Leukemia

New Drug for Children with High-Risk Leukemia
Each year, approximately 4,500 children in America are diagnosed with leukemia, as per the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society. A potentially deadly cancer of the blood, it is the most common cancer in children. "Modern medicine can cure eight out of 10 cases of childhood leukemia, so parents can still be hopeful when they hear a diagnosis," says Dr. Shai Izraeli of Tel Aviv University's Sackler School of Medicine and Sheba Medical Center. "Our........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 7/28/2009 11:33:12 PM)


Cigarette packaging still misleading consumers

Cigarette packaging still misleading consumers
New research suggests that current regulations have failed to remove misleading information from cigarette packaging, revealing that a substantial majority of consumers believe cigarettes are less hazardous when the packs display words such as "silver" or "smooth," lower numbers incorporated into the brand name, lighter colours or pictures of filters. In a study of 603 adults published recently (Tuesday) in the online edition of the Journal........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 7/27/2009 11:17:48 PM)


How the pathology of Parkinson's disease spreads?

How the pathology of Parkinson's disease spreads?
Accumulation of the synaptic protein alpha-synuclein, resulting in the formation of aggregates called Lewy bodies in the brain, is a hallmark of Parkinson's and other related neurodegenerative diseases. This pathology appears to spread throughout the brain as the disease progresses. Now, scientists at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine and Konkuk University in Seoul, South Korea, have described how this mechanism........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 7/27/2009 11:02:40 PM)


 

Toxic levels of Alzheimer's clusters in brain

Toxic levels of Alzheimer's clusters in brain
Researchers have long suspected that Alzheimer's disease (AD) is caused by a small protein called the amyloid β-protein (Aβ). This protein clumps or binds to itself, eventually changing chemically to create brain protein deposits (plaques) that are characteristic of AD. However, recent studies have suggested that it is not the plaques that cause AD but rather these small, grape-like clusters of Aβ. These clusters vary in size,........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 8/11/2009 11:17:36 PM)


Mystery behind long-lasting memories

Mystery behind long-lasting memories
A newly released study by scientists at Wake Forest University School of Medicine may reveal how long-lasting memories form in the brain. The scientists hope that the findings, now available online and scheduled to appear in an upcoming issue of Neuroscience, may one day help researchers develop therapys to prevent and treat conditions such as post-traumatic stress disorder. "Eventhough a number of things are known about memories that........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 8/11/2009 11:16:24 PM)


No-Needle Approach to Prevent Blood Clots

No-Needle Approach to Prevent Blood Clots
The dean of the University of Oklahoma College of Public Health and a team of researchers worldwide have found a better way to prevent deadly blood clots after joint replacement surgery - a major problem that results in thousands of unnecessary deaths each year. The research appears this week in the New England Journal (NEJM). The research team, which includes researchers from Oklahoma, Denmark, Australia and Canada, set out to find a better........Go to the Research news blog (Added on 8/11/2009 11:10:02 PM)


Diarrhea in metastatic melanoma patients

Diarrhea in metastatic melanoma patients
Patients with stage III or IV melanoma taking ipilimumab and the oral steroid budesonide to reduce side effects did not have less diarrhea, a known side effect of ipilimumab, as per results of a phase II trial published in Clinical Cancer Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. These findings would "discourage the prophylactic use of budesonide to reduce the gastrointestinal side effects of ipilimumab," said........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 8/11/2009 11:07:30 PM)


Starving the colon cancer cells

Starving the colon cancer cells
Researchers at the Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center have discovered how two cancer-promoting genes enhance a tumor's capacity to grow and survive under conditions where normal cells die. The knowledge, they say, may offer new therapys that starve cancer cells of a key nutrient - sugar. However, the researchers caution that research does not suggest that altering dietary sugar will make any difference in the growth and development of cancer.........Go to the Colon-cancer-blog (Added on 8/6/2009 11:35:03 PM)


Significant Benefits of F-FDG PET in Evaluating Colorectal Liver Metastases

Significant Benefits of F-FDG PET in Evaluating Colorectal Liver Metastases
The Access to Medical Imaging Coalition (AMIC) announced recently that a study published in this month's Journal of Nuclear Medicine demonstrated the tremendous benefits of advanced imaging in the assessment of colorectal liver metastases. Dr. Theo Ruers lead a team of scientists in evaluating the benefits of F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) when combined with computed tomography (CT), and its ability to diagnose........Go to the Colon-cancer-blog (Added on 8/5/2009 9:59:29 PM)


Hip and back fractures increase mortality rates in older adults

Hip and back fractures increase mortality rates in older adults
If you are 50 or older and you break your hip, you have a one in four chance of dying within five years. Break your back, and you have a one in six chance of dying that soon, says a McMaster University study. The research, to be published August 4 in the online edition of the Canadian Medical Association Journal (CMAJ), has observed that approximately 25 per cent of men and women who develop hip fractures and 16 per cent of people who........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 8/4/2009 8:23:21 AM)


High cholesterol in midlife raises risk of late-life dementia

High cholesterol in midlife raises risk of late-life dementia
Elevated cholesterol levels in midlife even levels considered only borderline elevated increase significantly the risk of Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia during the later part of life, as per a newly released study by scientists at Kaiser Permanente's Division of Research and the University of Kuopio in Finland. The study appears in the journal Dementia & Geriatric Cognitive Disorders The four-decade study of 9,844 men and women........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 8/4/2009 8:22:19 AM)


Income and education associated with sugar consumption

Income and education associated with sugar consumption
The intake of added sugars in the United States is excessive, estimated by the US Department of Agriculture in 1999-2002 as 17% of calories a day. Consuming foods with added sugars displaces nutrient-dense foods in the diet. Reducing or limiting intake of added sugars is an important objective in providing overall dietary guidance. In a study of nearly 30,000 Americans reported in the August 2009 issue of the Journal of the American Dietetic........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 8/2/2009 11:05:58 PM)


metformin reduces risk of pancreatic cancer

metformin reduces risk of pancreatic cancer
Taking the most commonly-prescribed anti-diabetic drug, metformin, reduces an individual's risk of developing pancreas cancer by 62 percent, as per research from The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, reported in the Aug. 1 issue of Gastroenterology "This is the first epidemiological study of metformin in the cancer population, and it offers an exciting direction for future chemoprevention research for a disease greatly in........Go to the Pancreatic cancer blog (Added on 8/2/2009 11:01:33 PM)


HIV integrase inhibitor effective

HIV integrase inhibitor effective
A member of a new class of antiretroviral drugs is safe and effective for patients beginning therapy against HIV, as per scientists who have completed a two-year multisite phase III clinical trial comparing it with standard antiretroviral drugs. The results are online and scheduled for publication in an upcoming issue of the Lancet Main author of the Lancet article is Jeffrey Lennox, MD, professor of medicine (infectious diseases) at........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 8/2/2009 10:58:28 PM)


Low short-term risks after bariatric surgery

Low short-term risks after bariatric surgery
Short-term complications and death rates were low following bariatric surgery to limit the amount of food that can enter the stomach, decrease absorption of food or both, as per the Longitudinal Evaluation of Bariatric Surgery (LABS-1). The study was funded by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), part of the National Institutes of Health. Results are published in the July 30 issue of the New England........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 7/31/2009 12:19:39 AM)


Health benefits of physical activity more pronounced in women

Health benefits of physical activity more pronounced in women
A number of experimental studies have observed that physical exercise can improve cholesterol levels and subsequently decrease the risks of cardiovascular disease; however, few of these studies have included enough participant diversity to provide ethnic breakdowns. Now, a long-term study of over 8,700 middle-aged men and women provides race- and gender- specific data on the cholesterol effects of physical activity, with the interesting result........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 7/29/2009 11:21:22 PM)


College students who feel 'invincible' unlikely to accept vaccines

College students who feel 'invincible' unlikely to accept vaccines
Vaccines to protect against sexually transmitted diseases, including HIV and herpes, are being developed and may soon be available to college students. However, limited research has been conducted to determine if students will accept the vaccines once they are available. In a newly released study, a University of Missouri researcher has observed that students who feel invulnerable, or invincible, to physical harm are unlikely to get an HIV........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 7/29/2009 11:13:45 PM)


Is that a good prognosis brain cancer?

Is that a good prognosis brain cancer?
UCLA scientists have uncovered a new way to scan brain tumors and predict which ones will be shrunk by the drug Avastin -- before the patient ever starts therapy. By linking high water movement in tumors to positive drug response, the UCLA team predicted with 70 percent accuracy which patients' tumors were the least likely to grow six months after treatment. Bronnie McNabb, 57, considers himself lucky. When his aggressive brain cancer........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 7/29/2009 11:10:34 PM)


Reducing risk of hospitalization in the elderly

Reducing risk of hospitalization in the elderly
Elderly adults who have less strength, poor physical function and low muscle density are at higher risk of being hospitalized in comparison to adults with more strength and better function. That's the finding of a newly released study in the Journal of the American Geriatric Society The study also observed that muscle density, a measure of how much fat in comparison to lean tissue there is in the muscle, is a more accurate gauge of a........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 7/29/2009 11:08:29 PM)


Maternal, paternal genes' tug-of-war

Maternal, paternal genes' tug-of-war
An analysis of rare inherited disorders in which children lack some genes from one parent suggests that maternal and paternal genes engage in a subtle tug-of-war well into childhood, and possibly as late as the onset of puberty. This striking new variety of intra-family conflict, described this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, is the latest wrinkle in the two-decades-old theory known as genomic imprinting, which........Go to the Research news blog (Added on 7/28/2009 11:37:33 PM)


Cancer vaccines for metastatic melanoma

Cancer vaccines for metastatic melanoma
Hoag Memorial Hospital Presbyterian today announced promising data from a clinical study showing patient-specific cancer vaccines derived from patients' own cancer cells and immune cells were well tolerated and resulted in impressive long-term survival rates in patients with metastatic melanoma whose disease had been minimized by other therapies. The study entitled "Phase II Trial of Dendritic Cells Loaded with Antigens from Self-Renewing,........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 7/28/2009 11:35:06 PM)


Being active as a preschooler pays off

Being active as a preschooler pays off
Being active at age 5 helps kids stay lean as they age even if they don't remain as active later in childhood, a new University of Iowa study shows. "We call this effect 'banking' because the kids benefit later on, similar to having a savings account at a bank. The protective effect is independent of what happens in between," said main author Kathleen Janz, professor of health and sport studies in the UI College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.........Go to the Pediatric news blog (Added on 7/28/2009 11:30:55 PM)


Smoking increases risk of metastatic pancreatic cancer

Smoking increases risk of metastatic pancreatic cancer
Smoking has once again been implicated in the development of advanced cancer. Exposure to nicotine by way of cigarette smoking may increase the likelihood that pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma will become metastatic, as per scientists from the Kimmel Cancer Center at Jefferson. Their study was reported in the August edition of the journal Surgery The culprit behind the increased metastasis potential may be an isoform (variant type) of a........Go to the Pancreatic cancer blog (Added on 7/27/2009 11:04:39 PM)


 

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Cancer terms:
Oncologist: Physician or surgeon who had specialized in the treatment of cancer. Medical oncologists usually treat patients with chemotherapy, hormonal therapy and biological therapy, radiation oncologists treat cancer with radiation therapy and surgical oncologists treat patients with surgery. See cancer terms for more cancer related terms.

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