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Exercise Suppresses Appetite By Affecting Appetite Hormones

Exercise Suppresses Appetite By Affecting Appetite Hormones
A vigorous 60-minute workout on a treadmill affects the release of two key appetite hormones, ghrelin and peptide YY, while 90 minutes of weight lifting affects the level of only ghrelin, as per a new study. Taken together, the research shows that aerobic exercise is better at suppressing appetite than non-aerobic exercise and provides a possible explanation for how that happens. This line of research may eventually lead to more effective........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 12/11/2008 5:07:04 AM)


How Power Affects Complex Decision Making

How Power Affects Complex Decision Making
Presidential scholars have written volumes trying to understand the presidential mind. How can anyone juggle so a number of complicated decisions? Do those seeking office have a unique approach to decision making? Studies have suggested that power changes not only a person's responsibilities, but also the way they think. Now, a new study in the recent issue of Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science,........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 12/9/2008 10:01:12 PM)


Genetic underpinnings of nicotine addiction

Genetic underpinnings of nicotine addiction
A new study from the Abramson Cancer Center and Department of Psychiatry in the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine shows that smokers who carry a particular version of a gene for an enzyme that regulates dopamine in the brain may suffer from concentration problems and other cognitive deficits when abstaining from nicotine a problem that puts them at risk for relapse during attempts to quit smoking. The findings, newly reported in........Go to the Research news blog (Added on 12/9/2008 9:25:32 PM)


Are men hardwired to overspend?

Are men hardwired to overspend?
Bling, foreclosures, rising credit card debt, bank and auto bailouts, upside down mortgages and perhaps a mid-life crisis new Corvette-all symptoms of compulsive overspending. University of Michigan researcher Daniel Kruger looks to evolution and mating for an explanation. He theorizes that men overspend to attract mates. It all boils down, as it has for hundreds of thousands of years, to making babies. Kruger, an assistant research........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 12/8/2008 10:33:22 PM)


Men with wives more likely to be screened for prostate cancer

Men with wives more likely to be screened for prostate cancer
Eventhough the link between early screening and prostate cancer survival is well established, men are less likely to go for early screening unless they have a wife or significant other living with them, as per a research studypublished in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers and Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. "In terms of motivating people to get screened, there may be benefit in targeting wives or........Go to the Prostate-cancer-blog (Added on 12/8/2008 10:30:09 PM)


Women are more likely than men to die in hospital from severe heart attack

Women are more likely than men to die in hospital from severe heart attack
Men and women have about the same adjusted in-hospital death rate for heart attack - but women are more likely to die if hospitalized for a more severe type of heart attack, as per a report in Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association. Among patients with ST elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) in a recent study, the death rate was 10.2 for women in comparison to 5.5 for men. Scientists said the women were older and had........Go to the Heart-watch-blog (Added on 12/8/2008 10:26:01 PM)


Oldest old 'hanging in the balance?'

Oldest old 'hanging in the balance?'
A lack of clear-cut, scientific evidence illustrating the benefits of mammography screening in women over 80 has created a trail of controversy leading to a disturbing conclusion about cancer care in America. "We are ill-prepared from a scientific knowledge perspective to provide cancer health care rationally, ethically, equitably and humanely to the 'booming' older population," say two leading cancer researchers. In an editorial published........Go to the Breast-cancer-blog (Added on 12/8/2008 10:18:01 PM)


A book of common prayers

A book of common prayers
In times of economic distress and plenty, ninety percent of Americans pray, more than half of us once a day or more. We pray for big things-to stay healthy, to keep our jobs, and to strengthen our relationships. And we pray for small things-to find parking spaces and missing items. Some of us are sure God exists and others pray simply to cover the bases. A novel Brandeis study reported in the current issue of Poetics analyzed 683 prayers........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 12/6/2008 4:43:32 PM)


A little wine boosts omega-3 in the body

A little wine boosts omega-3 in the body
Results from the European study IMMIDIET show that moderate wine intake is linked to higher levels of omega-3 fatty acids considered as protective against coronary heart disease. Moderate alcohol intake is linked to higher levels of omega-3 fatty acids in plasma and red blood cells. This is the major finding of the European study IMMIDIET that would be reported in the recent issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, an official........Go to the Heart-watch-blog (Added on 12/6/2008 4:32:31 PM)


Spreading the joy around

Spreading the joy around
A laugh can be infectious. You don't need a sophisticated study to tell you that. But does this happy contagion vanish as quickly as a smile? New research from James Fowler of UC San Diego and Nicholas Christakis of Harvard Medical School shows that happiness spreads far and wide through a social network traveling not just the well-known path from one person to another but even to people up to three degrees removed. This holiday season,........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 12/6/2008 4:09:51 PM)


Maintaining the brain's wiring in aging and disease

Maintaining the brain's wiring in aging and disease
Scientists at the Babraham Institute near Cambridge, supported by the Alzheimer's Research Trust and the Biotechnology and Biological Sciences Research Council (BBSRC), have discovered that the brain's circuitry survives longer than previously thought in diseases of ageing such as Alzheimer's disease. The findings were published recently in the journal Brain Alzheimer's disease causes nerve cells in the brain to die, resulting in problems........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 12/6/2008 3:53:52 PM)


Improving patient outcomes in several platelet disorders

Improving patient outcomes in several platelet disorders
Four studies that highlight significant advances in therapy and survival outcomes for patients with various forms of thrombocytopenia, a group of bleeding disorders characterized by a low number of platelets in the blood, will be presented in a press conference on Saturday, December 6, at 8:00 a.m., during the 50th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Hematology in San Francisco, CA. The studies featured in the press conference will report........Go to the Research news blog (Added on 12/6/2008 3:46:17 PM)


Pediatric obesity may alter thyroid function

Pediatric obesity may alter thyroid function
In addition to its strong associations with hypertension, cardiovascular disease, and diabetes, pediatric obesity may induce alterations in thyroid function and structure, as per a new study accepted for publication in The Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism (JCEM). Thyroid hormones drive metabolism, however demonstration of a direct or strong correlation of obesity with deficient thyroid function has been........Go to the Pediatric news blog (Added on 12/4/2008 5:30:43 AM)


Novel basis identified for tamoxifen failure

Novel basis identified for tamoxifen failure
Tamoxifen may worsen breast cancer in a small subset of patients. Research published in BioMed Central's open access journal Breast Cancer Research suggests that in patients who show reduced or absent expression of the protein E-cadherin, usually used anti-oestrogen drugs such as tamoxifen may promote more harmful cancer cell behaviour. A team of scientists co-ordinated by Dr. Stephen Hiscox, from the Welsh School of Pharmacy at Cardiff........Go to the Breast-cancer-blog (Added on 12/4/2008 5:25:57 AM)


Concerns about embryo disposition

Concerns about embryo disposition
Fertility patients who are done having children feel responsible for the stored, frozen embryos left over from their therapy, yet more than half are against implanting the embryos in anyone else, as per a new study by scientists at Duke University Medical Center. "This really turns our moral presumptions on their heads," says Anne Drapkin Lyerly, MD, an obstetrician/gynecologist and bioethicist at Duke, and lead investigator of the findings........Go to the OBGYN news blog (Added on 12/4/2008 5:20:28 AM)


What makes the heart 'tick-tock'

What makes the heart 'tick-tock'
Scientists have new evidence to show that the heart beats to its own drummer, as per a report in the recent issue of the journal Cell Metabolism, a Cell Press publication. They've uncovered some of the molecular circuitry within the cardiovascular system itself that controls the daily rise and fall of blood pressure and heart rate. The findings might also explain why usually used diabetes drugs come with cardiovascular benefits, as per the........Go to the Heart-watch-blog (Added on 12/3/2008 5:34:32 AM)


Up to 2 drinks per day not linked to heart problems in women

Up to 2 drinks per day not linked to heart problems in women
Women who have up to two alcoholic drinks per day do not appear to be at increased risk of atrial fibrillation (irregular heart beat), but drinking more than that amount is linked to a higher risk, as per a research studyin the December 3 issue of JAMA. Studies assessing the effects of regular alcohol consumption on the risk of atrial fibrillation have provided inconsistent results, with several studies finding significant associations........Go to the Heart-watch-blog (Added on 12/3/2008 5:32:21 AM)


Surgery to treat medication-resistant epilepsy

Surgery to treat medication-resistant epilepsy
Persons with temporal lobe epilepsy who do not respond to medicine could receive a substantial gain in life expectancy and quality of life by undergoing surgery of the temporal lobe part of the brain, as per an analysis published in the December 3 issue of JAMA. Despite currently available anti-epileptic drugs, 20 percent to 40 percent of all patients with epilepsy do not respond to medical management. Temporal lobe epilepsy is the most........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 12/3/2008 5:28:35 AM)


New breast imaging technology targets hard-to-detect cancers

New breast imaging technology targets hard-to-detect cancers
Breast-specific gamma imaging (BSGI) is effective in the detection of cancers not found on mammograms or by clinical exam, as per a research studypresented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA). "BSGI can identify the most difficult to detect breast cancerinvasive lobular carcinoma," said lead author Rachel F. Brem, M.D., professor of radiology and director of the Breast Imaging and Interventional........Go to the Breast-cancer-blog (Added on 12/3/2008 5:23:23 AM)


Some 'good cholesterol' isn't good enough

Some 'good cholesterol' isn't good enough
If you think your levels of "good cholesterol" are good enough, a new study reported in the December 2008 issue of The FASEB Journal suggests that you may want to think again. In the report, scientists from the University of Chicago challenge the conventional wisdom that simply having high levels of good cholesterol (HDL) and low levels of bad cholesterol (LDL) is necessary for good heath. Instead, they show that the good cholesterol has........Go to the Heart-watch-blog (Added on 12/1/2008 6:14:29 PM)


 

Honey adds health benefits and is a natural preservative

Honey adds health benefits and is a natural preservative
Antioxidant-rich honey is a healthy alternative to chemical additives and refined sweeteners in commercial salad dressings, said a new University of Illinois study. "To capitalize on the positive health effects of honey, we experimented with using honey in salad dressings," said Nicki Engeseth, a U of I associate professor of food chemistry. "We observed that the antioxidants in honey protected the quality of the salad dressings for up to........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 12/9/2008 10:25:42 PM)


Genetic markers identified for alcohol response

Genetic markers identified for alcohol response
Researchers at the UCSF Ernest Gallo Clinic and Research Center have identified a region on the human genome that appears to determine how strongly drinkers feel the effects of alcohol and thus how prone they are to alcohol abuse. The researchers found that a DNA sequence variation, known as a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), on chromosome 15 is significantly associated with the level of response to alcohol and could signal the genetic........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 12/9/2008 10:10:26 PM)


Causes of death on Mount Everest

Causes of death on Mount Everest
An international research team led by Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) researchers has conducted the first detailed analysis of deaths during expeditions to the summit of Mt. Everest. They observed that most deaths occur during descents from the summit in the so-called "death zone" above 8,000 meters and also identified factors that appear to be linked to a greater risk of death, especially symptoms of high-altitude cerebral edema. The........Go to the Research news blog (Added on 12/9/2008 9:56:24 PM)


Boy-girl bullying in middle grades common

Boy-girl bullying in middle grades common
Much more cross-gender bullying - specifically, unpopular boys harassing popular girls - occurs in later elementary school grades than previously thought, meaning educators should take reports of harassment from popular girls seriously, as per new research by a University of Illinois professor who studies child development. Philip C. Rodkin, a professor of child development at the U. of I.'s College of Education, said that while most bullies........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 12/9/2008 9:22:27 PM)


Selenium may prevent high risk-bladder cancer

Selenium may prevent high risk-bladder cancer
A study reported in the recent issue of Cancer Prevention Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research, suggests that selenium, a trace mineral found in grains, nuts and meats, may aid in the prevention of high-risk bladder cancer. Scientists from Dartmouth Medical School compared selenium levels in 767 individuals newly diagnosed with bladder cancer to the levels of 1,108 individuals from the general population.........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 12/8/2008 10:27:51 PM)


Men Are Red, Women Are Green

Men Are Red, Women Are Green
Michael J. Tarr, a Brown University scientist, and graduate student Adrian Nestor have discovered this color difference in an analysis of dozens of faces. They determined that men tend to have more reddish skin and greenish skin is more common for women. The finding has important implications in cognitive science research, such as the study of face perception. But the information also has many potential industry or consumer applications in........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 12/8/2008 10:21:28 PM)


An Achilles heel in cancer cells

An Achilles heel in cancer cells
A protein that shields tumor cells from cell death and exerts resistance to chemotherapy has an Achilles heel, a vulnerability that can be exploited to target and kill the very tumor cells it commonly protects, scientists from the University of Illinois at Chicago show in a new study reported in the Dec. 9 issue of Cancer Cell Akt is a signaling protein, called a kinase, that is hyperactive in the majority of human cancers. "Akt is........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 12/8/2008 10:14:39 PM)


Breaking the silence after a study ends

Breaking the silence after a study ends
While an estimated 2.3 million people in the United States take part in clinical trials every year, there currently exists no formal requirement to inform them of study results, an oversight that leaves participants confused, frustrated, and, in some cases, lacking information that may be important to their health. In an article published recently in the Archives of Neurology, scientists at the University of Rochester Medical Center have........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 12/8/2008 10:10:21 PM)


Insight on wonder of cell division

Insight on wonder of cell division
Biologists have discovered a mechanism that is critical to cytokinesis -- nature's completion of mitosis, where a cell divides into two identical daughter cells. The scientists have opened a new window on the assembly and activity of a ring of actin and myosin filaments that contract to pinch a cell at just the right time. They focused on key proteins whose roles drive signaling mechanisms that promote the production of both linear and........Go to the Research news blog (Added on 12/6/2008 4:12:22 PM)


Secondhand smoke raises odds of fertility problems

Secondhand smoke raises odds of fertility problems
If you need another reason to quit smoking, consider that it may diminish your chances of being a parent or grandparent. Researchers at the University of Rochester Medical Center have observed that women exposed to second hand smoke, either as adults or children, were significantly more likely to face fertility problems and suffer miscarriages. An epidemiologic analysis of more than 4,800 non-smoking women showed those who were exposed to........Go to the OBGYN news blog (Added on 12/6/2008 4:00:51 PM)


First international conference on inflammatory breast cancer

First international conference on inflammatory breast cancer
The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center will hold the first international inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) conference on December 6-7, to bring together internationally recognized breast cancer clinicians and scientists. Participants will present new clinical discoveries and participate in educational workshops, with the goal of improving diagnosis and management of this rare but deadly disease. During the conference, the new........Go to the Breast-cancer-blog (Added on 12/6/2008 3:49:21 PM)


Gene packaging tells story of cancer development

Gene packaging tells story of cancer development
To decipher how cancer develops, Johns Hopkins Kimmel Cancer Center researchers say scientists must take a closer look at the packaging. Specifically, their findings in the December 2, 2008, issue of PLoS Biology point to the three dimensional chromatin packaging around genes formed by tight, rosette-like loops of Polycomb group proteins (PcG). The chromatin packaging, a complex combination of DNA and proteins that compress DNA to fit inside........Go to the Research news blog (Added on 12/4/2008 7:43:19 PM)


Calcium and vitamin D may not be the only protection

Calcium and vitamin D may not be the only protection
Diets that are high in protein and cereal grains produce an excess of acid in the body which may increase calcium excretion and weaken bones, as per a new study accepted for publication in The Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism (JCEM). The study observed that increasing the alkali content of the diet, with a pill or through a diet rich in fruits and vegetables has the opposite effect and strengthens skeletal........Go to the Breast-cancer-blog (Added on 12/4/2008 5:29:18 AM)


Interferon needed for cells to "remember" how to defeat a virus

Interferon needed for cells to
Researchers at UT Southwestern Medical Center have determined that the immune-system protein interferon plays a key role in "teaching" the immune system how to fight off repeated infections of the same virus. The findings, available online and in the Dec. 15 issue of the Journal of Immunology, have potential application in the development of more effective vaccines and anti-viral therapies. Typically, when a person is infected with a........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 12/4/2008 5:24:37 AM)


Cutting the cord to determine babies' health risk

Cutting the cord to determine babies' health risk
Despite the well-known dangers of first- and secondhand smoke, an estimated ten percent of pregnant women in the U.S. are smokers. Exposure of a developing baby to harmful cigarette byproducts from mothers who smoke affects an estimated 420,000 newborns each year and poses a significant health care burden. Now, in the first study of its kind, a team of scientists has completed a global assessment of newborns' umbilical cord blood to better........Go to the OBGYN news blog (Added on 12/4/2008 5:21:49 AM)


Angled gantry technique reduced breast radiation exposure

Angled gantry technique reduced breast radiation exposure
A novel angled gantry approach to coronary CT angiography reduced radiation exposure to the breast by more than 50%, as per Thomas Jefferson University researchers. Ethan Halpern, M.D., associate professor of Radiology at Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University in Philadelphia, presented the research at the 94th Scientific Assembly and Annual Meeting of the Radiological Society of North America. "Radiation dose to the........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 12/4/2008 5:17:41 AM)


Brand-name drugs not superior to generic drugs

Brand-name drugs not superior to generic drugs
Contrary to the perception of some patients and physicians, there is no evidence that brand-name drugs are clinically superior to their generic counterparts, according to an article in the December 3 issue of JAMA, which examined studies comparing the effectiveness of generic vs. brand-name drugs for treating cardiovascular diseases. "The problem of rising prescription drug costs has emerged as a critical policy issue, straining the budgets........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 12/3/2008 5:30:19 AM)


Exposure to secondhand smoke reduced

Exposure to secondhand smoke reduced
As the correlation between second-hand smoke and coronary heart disease (CHD) became clearer and legislation was passed to reduce such passive smoking, exposures have been reduced. In an article reported in the January 2009 issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, scientists from the University of California, San Francisco, Partners Healthcare, Boston and Columbia University have recalibrated the CHD Policy Model to better predict........Go to the Heart-watch-blog (Added on 12/3/2008 5:25:36 AM)


Stress-related disorders affect brains processing of memory

Stress-related disorders affect brains processing of memory
Scientists using functional MRI (fMRI) have determined that the circuitry in the area of the brain responsible for suppressing memory is dysfunctional in patients suffering from stress-related psychiatric disorders. Results of the study will be presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA). "For patients with major depression and other stress-related disorders, traumatic memories are a source of........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 12/3/2008 5:21:47 AM)


Eating eggs when pregnant affects breast cancer in offspring

Eating eggs when pregnant affects breast cancer in offspring
A stunning discovery based on epigenetics (the inheritance of propensities acquired in the womb) reveals that consuming choline-a nutrient found in eggs and other foods-during pregnancy may significantly affect breast cancer outcomes for a mother's offspring. This finding by a team of biologists at Boston University is the first to link choline consumption during pregnancy to breast cancer. It also is the first to identify possible........Go to the Breast-cancer-blog (Added on 12/1/2008 6:21:42 PM)


 

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Cancer terms:
Oncologist: Physician or surgeon who had specialized in the treatment of cancer. Medical oncologists usually treat patients with chemotherapy, hormonal therapy and biological therapy, radiation oncologists treat cancer with radiation therapy and surgical oncologists treat patients with surgery. See cancer terms for more cancer related terms.

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