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Some women worry too much about breast

Some women worry too much about breast
Most women face only a small risk of breast cancer coming back after they complete their therapy. Yet a newly released study from the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center finds that nearly half of Latinas who speak little English expressed a great deal of worry about recurrence. "Some worry about cancer recurrence is understandable. But for some women, these worries can be so strong that they impact their therapy decisions,........Go to the Breast-cancer-blog (Added on 3/28/2011 7:05:59 AM)


Consumption of omega-3s

Consumption of omega-3s
A study of Yup'ik Eskimos in Alaska, who on average consume 20 times more omega-3 fats from fish than people in the lower 48 states, suggests that a high intake of these fats helps prevent obesity-related chronic diseases such as diabetes and heart disease. The study, led by scientists at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and conducted in collaboration with the Center for Alaska Native Health Research at the University of........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 3/25/2011 7:35:51 AM)


Anemia in postmenopausal women

Anemia in postmenopausal women
A newly released study reported in the April 2011 issue of the Journal of the American Dietetic Association indicates that inadequate nutrition is associated with a greater risk of anemia in postmenopausal women. "This study suggests that inadequate nutrient intakes are a significant risk factor for anemia in this population of older women and use of multivitamin/mineral supplements is not linked to lower rates of anemia," reports lead........Go to the OBGYN news blog (Added on 3/25/2011 7:12:51 AM)


Load Up on Fiber Now

Load Up on Fiber Now
A newly released study from Northwestern Medicine shows a high-fiber diet could be a critical heart-healthy lifestyle change young and middle-aged adults can make. The study found adults between 20 and 59 years old with the highest fiber intake had a significantly lower estimated lifetime risk for cardiovascular disease in comparison to those with the lowest fiber intake. The study will be presented March 23 at the American Heart........Go to the Heart-watch-blog (Added on 3/22/2011 10:31:29 PM)


Major clue in long-term memory making

Major clue in long-term memory making
You may remember the color of your loved one's eyes for years. But how?. Researchers think that long-term potentiation (LTP) � the long-lasting increase of signals across a correlation between brain cells -- underlies our ability to remember over time and to learn, but how that happens is a central question in neuroscience. Scientists at Duke University Medical Center have found a cascade of signaling molecules that allows a commonly very........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 3/20/2011 9:58:39 PM)


Length of time lived with obesity

Length of time lived with obesity
New research shows the number of years individuals live with obesity is directly linked to the risk of mortality, with individuals who live with obesity for more than 15 years tripling their risk. The research, undertaken by experts from Monash University and the University of Copenhagen, shows that the duration of obesity is a strong predictor of mortality - independent of the actual level of Body Mass Index (BMI). Using data which........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 3/18/2011 10:19:50 PM)


New Clues in Quest to Slow Aging

New Clues in Quest to Slow Aging
DNA contains all of the genetic instructions that make us who we are, and maintaining the integrity of our DNA over the course of a lifetime is a critical, yet complex part of the aging process. In an important, albeit early step forward, researchers have discovered how DNOne of the majortenance is regulated, opening the door to interventions that may enhance the body's natural preservation of genetic information. The new findings may help........Go to the Research news blog (Added on 3/18/2011 10:04:04 PM)


Help to Heal An Injured Joint

Help to Heal An Injured Joint
Knee patients need patience: injuries to these joints take weeks to heal. Fraunhofer scientists have now developed a system that documents the healing process in detail. This motivates patients and at the same time helps doctors to fine-tune the course of therapy. There's nothing like the sheer delight of sun and snow on a skiing trip. But a momentary lapse of concentration can have nasty consequences. Taking a tumble on the slopes often........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 3/18/2011 6:06:01 PM)


Free will and determinism through test methods

Free will and determinism through test methods
UA philosophy professor Shaun Nichols examines the notions of free will and determinism through test methods used in social sciences. Philosophers have argued for centuries, millennia actually, about whether our lives are guided by our own free will or are predetermined as the result of a continuous chain of events over which we have no control. On the one hand, it seems like everything that happens has come kind of causal explanation;........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 3/17/2011 10:44:52 PM)


Managing post-stroke depression

Managing post-stroke depression
Stroke patients who are not successfully treated for depression are at higher risk of losing some of their capability to function normally, as per a research studyin the March 15, 2011 issue of the journal Neurology Eventhough as a number of as a third of those who experience a stroke develop depression, a newly released study by scientists from the Regenstrief Institute, the schools of health and rehabilitation sciences and of medicine at........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 3/15/2011 11:09:34 PM)


Better Images of Bacteria

Better Images of Bacteria
It's a cloak that surpasses all others: a microscopic carbon cloak made of graphene that could change the way bacteria and other cells are imaged. Vikas Berry, assistant professor of chemical engineering at Kansas State University, and his research team are wrapping bacteria with graphene to address current challenges with imaging bacteria under electron microscopes. Berry's method creates a carbon cloak that protects the bacteria, allowing........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 3/15/2011 10:52:35 PM)


Malaria drug for pancreatic cancer?

Malaria drug for pancreatic cancer?
Researchers report they have shrunk or slowed the growth of notoriously resistant pancreatic tumors in mice, using a drug routinely prescribed for malaria and rheumatoid arthritis. The pre-clinical results, which will appear in the recent issue of the journal Genes & Development and is currently published on its web site, have already prompted the opening of a small clinical trial in patients with advanced pancreas cancer, one of the........Go to the Pancreatic cancer blog (Added on 3/15/2011 10:22:17 PM)


Focus on Prion Diseases

Focus on Prion Diseases
New research by Chongsuk Ryou, researcher at the UK Sanders-Brown Center on Aging and professor of microbiology, immunology and molecular genetics in the UK College of Medicine, may shed light on possible therapys for prion diseases. Prion diseases, which include Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease in humans and bovine spongiform encephalopathy ("mad cow" disease) in cattle, are caused by prions - unconventional pathogens composed of infectious........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 3/15/2011 7:57:20 AM)


Nursing home boom in China

Nursing home boom in China
A nursing home industry is booming in China as a rapid increase in the proportion of its elderly population forces a nationwide shift from traditional family care to institutional care, as per new research by Brown University gerontologists. The study, led by Zhanlian Feng, assistant professor of community health, and published online in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society, is the first systematic documentation of the growth and........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 3/15/2011 7:28:00 AM)


Prostate cancer patients on ADT gain significant weight

Prostate cancer patients on ADT gain significant weight
Seventy per cent of men who received androgen-deprivation treatment (ADT) after surgery to remove their prostate gland gained significant weight in the first year, putting on an average of 4.2kg, as per a paper in the recent issue of the urology journal BJUI. Scientists studied the recorded weights of 132 men who underwent radical prostatectomy between 1988 and 2009 at four US Veterans Affairs Medical Centers in California, Georgia and North........Go to the Prostate-cancer-blog (Added on 3/13/2011 11:56:10 AM)


Potential way to protect neurons

Potential way to protect neurons
Cell biologists pondering the death of neurons � brain cells � said today that by eliminating one ingredient from the cellular machinery, they prolonged the life of neurons stressed by a pesticide chemical. The finding identifies a potential therapeutic target to slow changes that lead to neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. The researchers, from The University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio,........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 3/13/2011 11:26:54 AM)


Genius quality might be the result of hormonal influences

Is genius might be a result of hormonal influences
A longstanding debate as to whether genius is a byproduct of good genes or good environment has an upstart challenger that may take the discussion in an entirely new direction. University of Alberta researcher Marty Mrazik says being bright appears to be due to an excess level of a natural hormone. Mrazik, a professor in the Faculty of Education's educational psychology department, and a colleague from Rider University in the U.S., have........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 3/13/2011 11:12:22 AM)


Brain has 3 layers of working memory

Brain has 3 layers of working memory
Scientists from Rice University and Georgia Institute of Technology have found support for the theory that the brain has three concentric layers of working memory where it stores readily available items. Memory scientists have long debated whether there are two or three layers and what the capacity and function of each layer is. In a paper in the recent issue of the Journal of Cognitive Psychology, scientists observed that short-term memory........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 3/10/2011 7:58:48 AM)


Passive smoking increases risk to unborn babies

Passive smoking increases risk to unborn babies
Pregnant non-smokers who breathe in the second-hand smoke of other people are at an increased risk of delivering stillborn babies or babies with defects, a study led by scientists at The University of Nottingham has found. The study, reported in the April edition of the journal Pediatrics, found passive smoking increased the risk of still birth by almost one-quarter (23 per cent) and was associated with a 13 per cent increased risk of........Go to the OBGYN news blog (Added on 3/10/2011 7:12:35 AM)


Improving capture of circulating cancer cells

Improving capture of circulating cancer cells
Circulating tumor cells, which play a crucial role in cancer metastasis, have been known to science for more than 100 years, and scientists have long endeavored to track and capture them. Now, a UCLA research team has developed an innovative device based on Velcro-like nanoscale technology to efficiently identify and "grab" these circulating tumor cells, or CTCs, in the blood. Metastasis is the most common cause of cancer-related death in........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 3/8/2011 7:47:23 AM)


 

'Spicing' up your love life possible

'Spicing' up your love life possible
Looking to spice up your sex life? Try adding ginseng and saffron to your diet. Both are proven performance boosters, as per a new scientific review of natural aphrodisiacs conducted by University of Guelph researchers. Indulge in wine and chocolate, too, but know that their amorous effects are likely all in your head. Stay away from the more obscure Spanish fly and Bufo toad. While purported to be sexually enhancing, they produced the........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 3/28/2011 7:04:24 AM)


A new colon cancer marker

A new colon cancer marker
A research team at the University of Colorado Cancer Center has identified an enzyme that could be used to diagnose colon cancer earlier. It is possible that this enzyme also could be a key to stopping the cancer. Colon cancer is the third most common cancer in Americans, with a one in 20 chance of developing it, as per the American Cancer Society. This enzyme biomarker could help physicians identify more colon cancers and do so at earlier........Go to the Colon-cancer-blog (Added on 3/26/2011 10:21:58 PM)


Psychiatric symptoms in children with epilepsy

Psychiatric symptoms in children with epilepsy
A newly published report reveals that children with epilepsy are more likely to have psychiatric symptoms, with gender a determining factor in their development. Findings showed that girls had more emotional problems, while boys had more hyperactivity/inattention problems and issues regarding peer relationships. Details of this study in Norwegian children are now available online in Epilepsia, a journal published by Wiley-Blackwell on behalf of........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 3/25/2011 7:10:32 AM)


Discovery in liver cancer cells

Discovery in liver cancer cells
Scientists at Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center and VCU Institute of Molecular Medicine (VIMM) have discovered a novel mechanism in gene regulation that contributes to the development of a form of liver cancer called hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Currently, there is virtually no effective therapy for HCC, and this breakthrough identifies a promising new target for therapeutic intervention. In the journal Hepatology,........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 3/22/2011 10:28:29 PM)


How do consumers estimate a good time?

How do consumers estimate a good time?
Consumers estimate they'll spend more time enjoying activities when the tasks are broken down into components, as per a newly released study in the Journal of Consumer Research But using the same process for an unpleasant event decreases time estimates. "It has been well established that predicted consumption time plays a central role in consumers' assessments and purchase decisions," write authors Claire I. Tsai and Min Zhao (both........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 3/20/2011 10:19:03 PM)


Brain research could hold key to alcohol problems

Brain research could hold key to alcohol problems
Scientists are using an innovative technique that combines brain stimulation and the measure of brain activity to investigate difficulties linked to giving up alcohol, with the hope of developing more effective therapies for alcohol dependence. Monash Alfred Psychiatry Research Centre, in collaboration with Turning Point Alcohol & Drug Centre, has developed a new non-invasive technique, which it hopes will directly measure activity in the........Go to the Research news blog (Added on 3/18/2011 10:22:45 PM)


New blood analysis chip

New blood analysis chip
A major milestone in microfluidics could soon lead to stand-alone, self-powered chips that can diagnose diseases within minutes. The device, developed by an international team of scientists from the University of California, Berkeley, Dublin City University in Ireland and Universidad de Valparaíso Chile, is able to process whole blood samples without the use of external tubing and extra components. The scientists have dubbed the device........Go to the Research news blog (Added on 3/18/2011 10:10:55 PM)


Radiation risks to health

Radiation risks to health
The growing concern surrounding the release of radiation from an earthquake and tsunami-stricken nuclear complex in Japan has raised fears of radiation exposure to populations in North America from the potential plume of radioactivity crossing the Pacific Ocean. To help Americans understand their radiation-related health risks, the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE), the American Thyroid Association (ATA), The Endocrine........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 3/18/2011 5:59:15 PM)


Want more zest for life?

Want more zest for life?
Does gardening contribute to quality of life and increased wellness for elderly adults? Scientists from the Texas A&M and Texas State Universities asked these questions in a survey of people aged 50 and older. The survey revealed some compelling reasons for elderly adults to get themselves out in the garden. Aime Sommerfeld, Jayne Zajicek, and Tina Waliczek designed a questionnaire to investigate older adult gardeners' and nongardeners'........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 3/17/2011 10:55:43 PM)


Unusual treatment of colonic perforation

Unusual treatment of colonic perforation
Colonoscopy is considered a safe procedure, eventhough complications can occur. The most dreaded of these is iatrogenic perforation. The literature reports perforation rates of 0.03%-0.8% for diagnostic procedures, and a rate of 0.15%-3% for therapeutic procedures. Mechanisms of perforation are the result of either mechanical disruption of the colonic wall (e.g. thermal injury, forced push into a diverticulum, or stretching of the bowel with........Go to the Colon cancer news blog (Added on 3/15/2011 11:12:00 PM)


Extended Parental Support as a Safety Net

Extended Parental Support as a Safety Net
A newly released study from the Journal of Marriage and Family shows that contrary to popular anxieties about slacker young adults who refuse to grow up, or indulgent parents who stifle their adult children's development by continuing to support them, there is evidence that parental assistance in early adulthood promotes progress toward autonomy and self-reliance. Study author Teresa Swartz, "The fact that young people depend so heavily upon........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 3/15/2011 10:57:11 PM)


Chasing the pot of gold

Chasing the pot of gold
Approximately two million adults in the United States meet criteria for pathological gambling, and another four to six million are considered problem gamblers, as per the National Council on Problem Gambling. A study by scientists at Wayne State University reveals that gambling addiction therapy is not one-size-fits-all, but it is difficult to predict which style of therapy is best for the various forms of gambling addiction. As per David M.........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 3/15/2011 10:24:20 PM)


Teens and young adults with cancer

Teens and young adults with cancer
Adolescents and young adults are neither children nor adults and those affected by cancer require targeted care that crosses the boundaries between pediatric and adult oncology, as per several pioneers in this still-developing field of adolescent and young adult oncology. An illuminating roundtable discussion by these experts would be reported in the premier issue of Journal of Adolescent and Young Adult Oncology, a multidisciplinary........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 3/15/2011 7:43:27 AM)


Parental monitoring of opposite-gender

Parental monitoring of opposite-gender
Young adults whose parents monitor their social interactions appears to be less likely to display impulsive behavior traits and to have alcohol-related problems, a newly released study suggests. The level of monitoring is associated with parenting style, and the link is stronger with the parent of the opposite gender. This study is one of the first to explore the link between parenting style and parental monitoring, as well as to explore the........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 3/15/2011 7:32:36 AM)


DCIS patients who get invasive breast cancer

DCIS patients who get invasive breast cancer
Women with ductal carcinoma in situ�DCIS�who later develop invasive breast cancer in the same breast are at higher risk of dying from breast cancer than those who do not develop invasive disease, as per a research studypublished online March 11 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute. Retrospective studies of women with DCIS have compared breast conserving surgery (lumpectomy) to mastectomy and observed that survival rates are........Go to the Breast-cancer-blog (Added on 3/13/2011 12:06:03 PM)


Most children slept through a smoke alarms

Most children slept through a smoke alarms
An Australian study to determine the likelihood of school-aged children waking up to their home smoke alarm observed that 78% of children slept through a smoke alarm sounding for 30 seconds. The outcomes of the study are published recently in the journal Fire and Materials. Home smoke detectors have been relied on since the 1960s, and have been known to save lives in domestic fires. The study's results show children are most at risk of not........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 3/13/2011 11:32:10 AM)


Secrets to Long life

Secrets to Long life
Good advice for a long life? As it turns out, no. In a groundbreaking study of personality as a predictor of longevity, University of California, Riverside scientists found just the opposite. "It's surprising just how often common assumptions - by both researchers and the media - are wrong," said Howard S. Friedman, distinguished professor of psychology who led the 20-year study. Friedman and Leslie R. Martin , a 1996 UCR alumna (Ph.D.)........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 3/13/2011 11:09:46 AM)


Keeping an eye on H1N1

Keeping an eye on H1N1
In the fall of 1917, a new strain of influenza swirled around the globe. At first, it resembled a typical flu epidemic: Most deaths occurred among the elderly, while younger people recovered quickly. However, in the summer of 1918, a deadlier version of the same virus began spreading, with disastrous consequence. In total, the pandemic killed at least 50 million people - about 3 percent of the world's population at the time. That two-wave........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 3/10/2011 8:01:10 AM)


Selectively Controlling Anxiety Pathways in the Brain

Selectively Controlling Anxiety Pathways in the Brain
A newly released study sheds light--both literally and figuratively--on the intricate brain cell connections responsible for anxiety. Researchers at Stanford University recently used light to activate mouse neurons and precisely identify neural circuits that increase or decrease anxiety-related behaviors. Pinpointing the origin of anxiety brings psychiatric professionals closer to understanding anxiety disorders, the most common class of........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 3/10/2011 7:34:22 AM)


Low birth weight and obesity later in life

Low birth weight and obesity later in life
Providing further understanding of the link between low birth weights and obesity during the later part of life, scientists found nutritionally deprived newborns are "programmed" to eat more because they develop less neurons in the region of the brain that controls food intake, as per an article published recently in the journal, Brain Research The study by a team of scientists at Los Angeles Biomedical Research Institute at Harbor-UCLA........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 3/10/2011 7:08:24 AM)


 

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Cancer terms:
Oncologist: Physician or surgeon who had specialized in the treatment of cancer. Medical oncologists usually treat patients with chemotherapy, hormonal therapy and biological therapy, radiation oncologists treat cancer with radiation therapy and surgical oncologists treat patients with surgery. See cancer terms for more cancer related terms.

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