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Study of breast cancer in black women

Study of breast cancer in black women
A new study seeking to improve scientists' understanding of breast cancer, including why the disease's fatality rate is higher in African-American women, is getting underway in 44 counties in North Carolina. The project, named after the late Jeanne Hopkins Lucas, a North Carolina state senator who died of breast cancer last year, is being run by the Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. ........Go to the Breast-cancer-blog (Added on 10/31/2008 5:38:57 AM)


Personality shapes perception of romance

Personality shapes perception of romance
Personality scientists have long known that people who report they have certain personality traits are also more (or less) likely to be satisfied with their romantic partners. Someone who says she is often anxious or moody, for example, is more likely than her less neurotic counterpart to be dissatisfied with her significant other. In a new analysis, scientists at the University of Illinois observed that measuring the quality of romantic........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 10/31/2008 5:28:38 AM)


Type-1 diabetes not so much bad genes

Type-1 diabetes not so much bad genes
Investigators combing the genome in the hope of finding genetic variants responsible for triggering early-onset diabetes may be looking in the wrong place, new research at the Stanford University School of Medicine suggests. Early-onset diabetes, also known as type-1 diabetes, is an autoimmune disease, caused when the immune system attacks and destroys insulin-producing cells in a person's pancreas. What triggers that immune response........Go to the Diabetes-watch-blog (Added on 10/31/2008 5:15:29 AM)


Workplace obesity program shows modest effects

Workplace obesity program shows modest effects
Environmental changes implemented at 12 Dow Chemical Company worksites helped employees' there achieve modest improvements in health risks, including weight management, decreasing tobacco use and blood pressure, says Emory University public health researcher Ron Goetzel, PhD. Goetzel and his team will present the findings from their study Oct. 29, 2008, at the annual meeting of the American Public Health Association in San Diego. "These........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 10/29/2008 10:16:32 PM)


Grapes may aid a bunch of heart risk factors

Grapes may aid a bunch of heart risk factors
Could eating grapes help fight hypertension correlation to a salty diet? And could grapes calm other factors that are also correlation to heart diseases such as heart failure? A new University of Michigan Cardiovascular Center study suggests so. The new study, reported in the recent issue of the Journal of Gerontology: Biological Sciences, gives tantalizing clues to the potential of grapes in reducing cardiovascular risk. The effect is........Go to the Heart-watch-blog (Added on 10/29/2008 10:14:19 PM)


New Chemical Key That Could Unlock Hundreds Of New Antibiotics

New Chemical Key That Could Unlock Hundreds Of New Antibiotics
Chemistry scientists at The University of Warwick and the John Innes Centre, have found a novel signalling molecule that could be a key that will open up hundreds of new antibiotics unlocking them from the DNA of the Streptomyces family of bacteria. With bacterial resistance growing scientists are keen to uncover as a number of new antibiotics as possible. Some of the Streptomyces bacteria are already used industrially to produce current........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 10/29/2008 9:44:57 PM)


The upside to allergies: cancer prevention

The upside to allergies: cancer prevention
A new article in the recent issue of The Quarterly Review of Biology provides good evidence that allergies are much more than just an annoying immune malfunction. They may protect against certain types of cancer. The article, by scientists Paul Sherman, Erica Holland and Janet Shellman Sherman from Cornell University, suggests that allergy symptoms may protect against cancer by expelling foreign particles, some of which may be carcinogenic........Go to the Allergy news blog (Added on 10/29/2008 8:50:36 PM)


Study Reveals That Red Enhances Men

Study Reveals That Red Enhances Men
A groundbreaking study by two University of Rochester psychology experts would be published online Oct. 28 by the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology adds color-literally and figuratively-to the age-old question of what attracts men to women. Through five psychological experiments, Andrew Elliot, professor of psychology, and Daniela Niesta, post-doctoral researcher, demonstrate that the color red makes men feel more amorous toward........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 10/28/2008 5:15:41 AM)


Statins associated with lower risk of death from pneumonia

Statins associated with lower risk of death from pneumonia
Individuals who take cholesterol-lowering statins before being hospitalized with pneumonia appear less likely to die within 90 days afterward, as per a report in the October 27 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals. In the United States and Europe, pneumonia hospitalization rates have increased 20 percent to 50 percent over the past decade, as per background information in the article. About 10 percent to........Go to the Lung news blog (Added on 10/27/2008 10:39:59 PM)


Methamphetamine abuse linked to underage sex

Methamphetamine abuse linked to underage sex
Children and adolescents who abuse alcohol or are sexually active are more likely to take methamphetamines (MA), also known as 'meth' or 'speed'. Research published recently in the open access journal BMC Pediatrics reveals the risk factors linked to MA use, in both low-risk children (those who don't take drugs) and high-risk children (those who have taken other drugs or who have ever attended juvenile detention centres). MA is a stimulant,........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 10/27/2008 10:31:39 PM)


Brain stimulation improves dexterity

Brain stimulation improves dexterity
Applying electrical stimulation to the scalp and the underlying motor regions of the brain could make you more skilled at delicate tasks. Research published recently in the open access journal BMC Neuroscience shows that a non-invasive brain-stimulation technique, transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS), is able to improve the use of a person's non-dominant hand. Drs. Gottfried Schlaug and Bradley Vines from Beth Israel Deaconess........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 10/27/2008 10:30:34 PM)


Vaccinating family members offers important flu protection to newborns

Vaccinating family members offers important flu protection to newborns
Vaccinating new mothers and other family members against influenza before their newborns leave the hospital creates a "cocooning effect" that may shelter unprotected children from the flu, a virus that can be life-threatening to infants, as per scientists at Duke Children's Hospital. The hospital-based outreach tested in this study proved effective at boosting immunization rates in parents particularly new fathers and siblings who........Go to the Pediatric news blog (Added on 10/27/2008 5:42:38 AM)


High-dose influenza vaccine shows increased immune response

High-dose influenza vaccine shows increased immune response
Washington, DC, October 26, 2008 - Sanofi Pasteur, the vaccines division of sanofi-aventis Group, announced recently that an investigational high-dose influenza vaccine demonstrated increased immune responses among adults 65 years of age and older compared with the standard influenza vaccine. The candidate high-dose intramuscular formulation of the influenza vaccine is being developed by sanofi pasteur. The results were reported today at the........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 10/27/2008 5:37:16 AM)


Stress may make you itch

Stress may make you itch
Gera number of Current research suggests that stress may activate immune cells in your skin, resulting in inflammatory skin disease. The related report by Joachim et al., "Stress-induced Neurogenic Inflammation in Murine Skin Skews Dendritic Cells towards Maturation and Migration: Key role of ICAM-1/LFA-1 interactions," appears in the recent issue of The American Journal of Pathology Skin provides the first level of defense to infection,........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 10/27/2008 5:33:52 AM)


Green tea may delay onset of type 1 diabetes

Green tea may delay onset of type 1 diabetes
A powerful antioxidant in green tea may prevent or delay the onset of type 1 diabetes, Medical College of Georgia scientists say. Scientists were testing EGCG, green tea's predominant antioxidant, in a laboratory mouse with type 1 diabetes and primary Sjogren's syndrome, which damages moisture-producing glands, causing dry mouth and eyes. "Our study focused on Sjogren's syndrome, so learning that EGCG also can prevent and delay........Go to the Diabetes-watch-blog (Added on 10/23/2008 9:24:51 PM)


Hypnosis can induce synesthesia

Hypnosis can induce synesthesia
Hypnosis can induce "synesthetic" experiences where one sense triggers the involuntary use of another within an average brain, as per a new study in the journal Psychological Science, the premiere publication of the Association for Psychological Society. The findings suggests that people with synesthesia, contrary to popular belief, do not necessarily have extra connections in their brain; rather, their brains may simply do more 'cross........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 10/23/2008 8:52:21 PM)


Seeing a brain as it learns to see

Seeing a brain as it learns to see
A brain isn't born fully organized. It builds its abilities through experience, making physical connections between neurons and organizing circuits to store and retrieve information in milliseconds for years afterwards. Now that process has been caught in the act for the first time by a Duke University research team that watched a nave brain organize itself to interpret images of motion. "This is the first time that anyone has been able........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 10/23/2008 5:35:58 AM)


New way of inhibiting cell cycle shows promise

New way of inhibiting cell cycle shows promise
Geneva, Switzerland: A new anti-cancer compound that works by blocking a part of the cell's machinery that is crucial for cell division has shown promising results in a phase I clinical trial in patients who have failed to respond to other therapys. Now it is going forward into a phase II clinical trial programme. In addition, the compound will also be tested in combination with other anti-cancer drugs to see whether combined therapies could be........Go to the Research news blog (Added on 10/22/2008 10:41:03 PM)


high-dose hormone treatment might reduce risk for PTSD

high-dose hormone treatment might reduce risk for PTSD
Philadelphia, PA, October 22, 2008 Cortisol helps our bodies cope with stress, but what about its effects on the brain? A new study by Cohen and his colleagues, appearing in the October 15th issue of Biological Psychiatry, suggests that the answer to this question is complex. In an animal model of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), high doses of a cortisol-related substance, corticosterone, prevented negative consequences of stress........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 10/22/2008 10:39:01 PM)


Eating quickly risks being overweight

Eating quickly risks being overweight
The combination of eating quickly and eating until full trebles the risk of being overweight, as per a research studypublished recently on bmj.com. Until the last decade or so most adults did not have the opportunity to consume enough energy to enable fat to be stored. However, with the increased availability of inexpensive food in larger portions, fast food, and fewer families eating together and eating while distracted (e.g. while watching........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 10/21/2008 9:46:11 PM)


 

Friend or foe? Body's clot-busting system and atherosclerosis

Friend or foe? Body's clot-busting system and atherosclerosis
Sometimes it's hard to tell friends from foes, biologically speaking. Naturally produced in the body, urokinase plasminogen activator and plasminogen interact to break up blood clots and recruit clean-up cells to clear away debris correlation to inflammation. In fact, urokinase manufactured as a drug effectively clears clogged arteries by generating clot-busting plasmin from blood-derived plasminogen. However, despite the efficacy of........Go to the Heart-watch-blog (Added on 10/31/2008 5:37:35 AM)


Drinking milk to ease milk allergy?

Drinking milk to ease milk allergy?
Giving children with milk allergies increasingly higher doses of milk over time may ease, and even help them completely overcome, their allergic reactions, as per the results of a study led by the Johns Hopkins Children's Center and conducted jointly with Duke University. Despite the small number of patients in the trial 19 the findings are illuminating and encouraging, researchers say, because this is the first-ever double-blinded and........Go to the Allergy news blog (Added on 10/31/2008 5:26:16 AM)


Gaining too much weight during pregnancy

Gaining too much weight during pregnancy
A study by the Kaiser Permanente Center for Health Research of more than 40,000 women and their babies observed that women who gained more than 40 pounds during their pregnancies were nearly twice as likely to have a heavy baby. Reported in the recent issue of Obstetrics & Gynecology, the study observed that more than one in five women gains excessive weight during pregnancy, doubling her chances of having a baby that weighs 9 pounds or more. ........Go to the OBGYN news blog (Added on 10/31/2008 5:12:49 AM)


Can your doctor correctly read a critical heart test?

Can your doctor correctly read a critical heart test?
You have a burning chest pain and a doctor looks at a squiggly-lined graph to determine the cause. That graph, an electrocardiogram (ECG or EKG), can help the doctor decide whether you're having a heart attack or an acid attack from last night's spaghetti. Correct interpretation may prompt life-saving, emergency measures; incorrect interpretation may delay care with life-threatening consequences. Currently, there is no uniform way to teach........Go to the Heart news blog (Added on 10/31/2008 5:08:02 AM)


Metal hazard from table wines

Metal hazard from table wines
Potentially hazardous levels of metal ions are present in a number of commercially available wines. An analysis of reported levels of metals in wines from sixteen different countries, reported in the open access Chemistry Central Journal, observed that only those from Argentina, Brazil and Italy did not pose a potential health risk owing to metals. Professor Declan Naughton and Doctor Andrea Petrczi from Kingston University, South West........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 10/29/2008 10:12:31 PM)


New drug target in obesity: Fat cells make lots of melanin

New drug target in obesity: Fat cells make lots of melanin
As millions of Americans gear up for the Thanksgiving holiday, a new research report published online in The FASEB Journal (http://www.fasebj.org), may provide some relief for those leery of having a second helping. In the report, scientists describe a discovery that may allow some obese people avoid common obesity-related metabolic problems without actually losing weight: they make a common antioxidant, melanin, in excess. Even more promising........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 10/29/2008 9:42:41 PM)


New pancreas tumor registry

New pancreas tumor registry
Charles J. Yeo, M.D., Samuel D. Gross Professor and Chair, Department of Surgery at Jefferson Medical College of Thomas Jefferson University, announces the establishment of the new Jefferson Pancreas Tumor Registry (JPTR). "The purpose of the registry is to further study whether pancreas cancer occurs more frequently in families with a history of the disease," said Dr. Yeo, who is the principal investigator of JPTR. "It will also be used to........Go to the Pancreatic cancer blog (Added on 10/29/2008 8:52:33 PM)


Engineering technique to identify disease-causing genes

Engineering technique to identify disease-causing genes
Researchers think that complex diseases such as schizophrenia, major depression and cancer are not caused by one, but a multitude of dysfunctional genes. A novel computational biology method developed by a research team led by Ali Abdi, PhD, http://www.njit.edu/news/2008/2008-367.php, associate professor in NJIT's department of electrical and computer engineering, has found a way to uncover the critical genes responsible for disease........Go to the Research news blog (Added on 10/28/2008 10:28:12 PM)


Green neighborhoods may reduce childhood obesity

Green neighborhoods may reduce childhood obesity
Childhood obesity can lead to type 2 diabetes, asthma, hypertension, sleep apnea and emotional distress. Obese children and youth are likely to be obese as adults, experience more cardiovascular disease, hypertension and stroke and incur higher healthcare costs. In an article reported in the December 2008 issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, scientists report that children living in inner city neighborhoods with higher........Go to the Pediatric news blog (Added on 10/28/2008 5:08:02 AM)


Caregiving may be associated with poorer health

Caregiving may be associated with poorer health
Older white caregivers (those who provide regular care or assistance for a child or a disabled or sick adult) appear to have poorer health outcomes than black female caregivers, as per a report in the October 27 issue of Archives of Internal Medicine, one of the JAMA/Archives journals. Eventhough past studies have observed that caregivers have poorer immune status than non-caregivers, there has not been any consistent evidence stating that........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 10/27/2008 10:35:51 PM)


New brain link as cause of schizophrenia

New brain link as cause of schizophrenia
A lack of specific brain receptors has been linked with schizophrenia in new research by researchers at Newcastle University. In work published recently in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the team has observed that NMDA receptors are essential in modifying brain oscillations electrical wave patterns which are altered in patients with schizophrenia. They now want to investigate whether optimising the function of the........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 10/27/2008 10:28:22 PM)


Purple tomatoes: The richness of antioxidants against tumors

Purple tomatoes: The richness of antioxidants against tumors
Scientists from the John Innes Centre in Norwich, Great Britain, in collaboration with other European centres participating to the FLORA project, have obtained genetically modified tomatoes rich in anthocyanins, a category of antioxidants belonging to the class of flavonoids. These tomatoes, added to the diet of cancer-prone mice, showed a significant protective effect by extending the mice lifespan. The research has been reported in the 26........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 10/27/2008 5:41:24 AM)


Credit crunch threatens new medicines

Credit crunch threatens new medicines
The global financial crisis could seriously delay the discovery and production of a number of new life-saving medicines, warns a major international conference today (Monday). Investment into research for new drugs - which globally runs into the billions is now seriously at threat as former investors in the drug companies shy away as a result of the economic meltdown. Professor David Wield, Director of the Economic and Social Research........Go to the Research news blog (Added on 10/27/2008 5:35:04 AM)


Self-assembling 'organic wires'

Self-assembling 'organic wires'
From pacemakers constructed of materials that so closely mimic human tissues that a patient's body can't discern the difference to devices that bypass injured spinal cords to restore movement to paralyzed limbs, the possibilities presented by organic electronics read like something from a science fiction novel. Derived from carbon-based compounds (hence the term "organic"), these "soft" electronic materials are valued as lightweight,........Go to the Research news blog (Added on 10/23/2008 9:29:45 PM)


Study finds that practice makes perfect in lung cancer surgery

Study finds that practice makes perfect in lung cancer surgery
Patients operated on by surgeons who do not routinely remove cancer from the lungs may be at a higher risk for complications, as per a research studyconducted by scientists at Duke University Medical Center. "Our study observed that hospitals that do higher volumes of these types of surgeries have correspondingly lower mortality rates than those who do fewer of the procedures," said Andrew Shaw, M.D., an anesthesiologist at Duke and lead........Go to the Lung-cancer-blog (Added on 10/23/2008 9:21:41 PM)


BG-12 significantly reduced brain lesions in multiple sclerosis

BG-12 significantly reduced brain lesions in  multiple sclerosis
Cambridge, MA October 23, 2008 Biogen Idec (NASDAQ: BIIB) today announced the publication of Phase IIb data showing that a 240 mg three-times-daily dose of the company's novel oral compound, BG-12 (BG00012, dimethyl fumarate), reduced the number of new gadolinium enhancing (Gd+) lesions by 69 percent in patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (MS) when in comparison to therapy with placebo (pThe Lancet BG-12 is the first........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 10/23/2008 9:04:48 PM)


How antibiotic sets up road block to kill bacteria

How antibiotic sets up road block to kill bacteria
Researchers have taken a critical step toward the development of new and more effective antibacterial drugs by identifying exactly how a specific antibiotic sets up a road block that halts bacterial growth. The antibiotic, myxopyronin, is a natural substance that is made by bacteria to fend off other bacteria. Researchers already knew that this antibiotic inhibited the actions of an enzyme called RNA polymerase, which sets gene expression in........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 10/23/2008 5:32:04 AM)


Gene expression for advanced bowel cancer

Gene expression for advanced bowel cancer
Research by researchers in France has demonstrated for the first time that identifying patterns of gene expression can be used to predict response to therapy in patients with advanced metastatic colorectal cancer. Dr Maguy Del Rio, a scientist at the Institut de Recherche en Cancrologie de Montpellier (Montpellier, France), presented a study to the 20th EORTC-NCI-AACR Symposium on Molecular Targets and Cancer Therapeutics in Geneva today........Go to the Colon-cancer-blog (Added on 10/22/2008 10:42:19 PM)


Developing depression after a heart attack

Developing depression after a heart attack
Science has found a number of links between depression and other serious medical illnesses, such as cancer, stroke, diabetes, and heart disease. For example, people who develop depression following a heart attack (myocardial infarction) or chest pain (angina) have an elevated risk of cardiac death or hospital readmission over the following year. In a new study scheduled for publication in the October 15th issue of Biological Psychiatry,........Go to the Heart-watch-blog (Added on 10/22/2008 10:36:59 PM)


New MRI technique may identify cervical cancer early

New MRI technique may identify cervical cancer early
Using high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) with a special vaginal coil, a technique to measure the movement of water within tissue, scientists may be able to identify cervical cancer in its early stages, as per a new study being reported in the recent issue of Radiology The new technique offers better imaging of smaller tumors and may also improve surgical options when fertility-sparing procedures are being considered. "Small........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 10/21/2008 10:11:43 PM)


 

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Oncologist: Physician or surgeon who had specialized in the treatment of cancer. Medical oncologists usually treat patients with chemotherapy, hormonal therapy and biological therapy, radiation oncologists treat cancer with radiation therapy and surgical oncologists treat patients with surgery. See cancer terms for more cancer related terms.

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