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Do children need both a mother and a father?

Do children need both a mother and a father?
The presumption that children need both a mother and a father is widespread. It has been used by proponents of Proposition 8 to argue against same-sex marriage and to uphold a ban on same-sex adoption. On the other end of the political spectrum, Barack Obama endorsed the vital role of fathers in a 2008 speech: "Of all the rocks upon which we build our lives, we are reminded today that family is the most important. And we are called to........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 1/22/2010 8:22:08 AM)


Face Masks and Hand Hygiene

Face Masks and Hand Hygiene
Ordinary face masks and hand hygiene can effectively reduce the transmission of influenza-like illness during flu season. The finding comes from a newly released study, now available online, reported in the Feb. 15 issue of The Journal of Infectious Diseases. In an influenza pandemic, vaccination may not be initially available, and antiviral prescribing appears to be limited, which is why researchers need to understand how effective other........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 1/22/2010 8:20:50 AM)


Going to the gym shouldn't be a workout for your eardrums

Going to the gym shouldn't be a workout for your eardrums
Listening to an iPod while working out feels like second nature to a number of people, but University of Alberta researcher Bill Hodgetts says we need to consider the volume levels in our earphones while working up a sweat. Hodgetts, assistant professor in the Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology at the Faculty of Rehabilitation Medicine, says his research has observed that exercising in a gym often prompts people to turn up the........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 1/21/2010 8:24:18 AM)


COPD and heart function

COPD and heart function
A common lung condition, COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) diminishes the heart's ability to pump effectively even when the disease has no or mild symptoms, as per research reported in the Jan. 21 issue of the New England Journal (NEJM) The study is the first time scientists have shown strong links between heart function and mild COPD. The research was funded by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI) of the National........Go to the Lung news blog (Added on 1/21/2010 8:21:57 AM)


Dopamine Medications Affect Learning and Attention

Dopamine Medications Affect Learning and Attention
A new brain-based computational model is helping to understand how Parkinson's disease and dopamine medications-used to treat motor symptoms caused by the disease- can affect learning and attention. As reported in a forthcoming article in the Journal of Cognitive Neuroscience, http://www.mitpressjournals.org/doi/pdf/10.1162/jocn.2010.21420, a new computational model, developed by Drs. Ahmed Moustafa and Mark Gluck, at the Center for........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 1/21/2010 8:19:23 AM)


Heart Attack Victims Who Have ECGs

Heart Attack Victims Who Have ECGs
A recent study observed that individuals experiencing chest pain who had electrocardiogram (ECG or EKG) evaluations previous to arriving at the hospital experienced a significantly reduced time-to-treatment or door-to-balloon (D2B) time. When EMS personnel responding to cardiac emergencies obtained ECGs of the subjects in the field, the mean D2B time was 60.2 minutes compared with 90.5 minutes for in-hospital ECGs. This advanced evaluation........Go to the Heart-watch-blog (Added on 1/21/2010 8:16:32 AM)


Staring, sleepiness, other mental lapses

Staring, sleepiness, other mental lapses
Cognitive fluctuations, or episodes when train of thought temporarily is lost, are more likely to occur in older persons who are in the process of developing Alzheimer's disease than in their healthy peers, as per researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. Cognitive fluctuations include excessive daytime sleepiness, staring into space and disorganized or illogical thinking. "If you have these lapses, they don't........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 1/19/2010 8:24:52 AM)


Genetic Risk Factor for Parkinson's Disease

Genetic Risk Factor for Parkinson's Disease
An international team of doctors and human geneticists has identified a new genetic risk factor for Parkinson's disease. The institutions involved in the study were the Institute of Human Genetics of Helmholtz Zentrum München and Technische Universität München, the Neurological Clinic of Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität Munich (LMU) and the Mitochondrial Research Group of Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. "Our study reveals the........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 1/18/2010 8:20:18 AM)


Artificial muscles restore ability to blink

Artificial muscles restore ability to blink
Surgeons from UC Davis Medical Center have demonstrated that artificial muscles can restore the ability of patients with facial paralysis to blink, a development that could benefit the thousands of people each year who no longer are able to close their eyelids due to combat-related injuries, stroke, nerve injury or facial surgery. In addition, the technique, which uses a combination of electrode leads and silicon polymers, could be used to........Go to the Ophthalmology news blog (Added on 1/18/2010 7:59:35 AM)


Fit to drive?

Fit to drive?
A number of healthcare professionals are failing to advise people with medical conditions that could affect their ability to drive whether they should get behind the wheel, as per research from the University of Warwick. Scientists from the University's Warwick Medical School have found a number of healthcare professionals are failing to tell patients with certain conditions such as diabetes or visual impairment if they are not fit to drive.........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 1/15/2010 8:08:04 AM)


Trial of new osteoporosis drug

Trial of new osteoporosis drug
Endocrinologists at the University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine and UPMC are launching a human trial of a new drug that their research indicates holds great promise for building bones weakened by osteoporosis. For the study, 105 participants will be randomly assigned to receive either teriparitide ( Forteo), a drug that already is FDA-approved for osteoporosis therapy, or an experimental agent called parathyroid hormone-related protein........Go to the Research news blog (Added on 1/15/2010 8:07:00 AM)


Who's afraid of the HPV vaccine?

Who's afraid of the HPV vaccine?
A newly released study concludes that people tend to match their risk perceptions about policy issues with their cultural values, which may explain the intense disagreement about proposals to vaccinate elementary-school girls against human-papillomavirus (HPV). The study also says people's values shape their perceptions of expert opinion on the vaccine. HPV is a widespread disease that, when sexually transmitted, can cause cervical cancer.........Go to the Cervical cancer blog (Added on 1/14/2010 8:00:58 AM)


56 percent of young adults infected with HPV

56 percent of young adults infected with HPV
A groundbreaking study of couples led by Professor Eduardo Franco, Director of McGill University's Cancer Epidemiology Unit, in collaboration with a team of colleagues from McGill and Universit de Montral/Centre Hospitalier de l'Universit de Montral (CHUM), found more than half (56 per cent) of young adults in a new sexual relationship were infected with human papillomavirus (HPV). Of those, nearly half (44 per cent) were infected with an HPV........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 1/14/2010 7:49:01 AM)


How Melanoma Ivades Immune System

How Melanoma Ivades Immune System
Melanoma, if not detected in its early stages, transforms into a highly deadly, therapy-resistant cancer. Eventhough the immune system initially responds to melanoma and mounts anti-tumor attacks, these assaults are generally ineffective, allowing more advanced melanomas to win the battle and spread beyond the primary site. Now, scientists at Children's Hospital Boston and Brigham and Women's Hospital (BWH) shed light on how melanomas........Go to the Skin news blog (Added on 1/13/2010 8:15:18 AM)


Mind-Body Techniques for Treating Celiac Disease

Mind-Body Techniques for Treating Celiac Disease
For adults and children diagnosed with celiac disease, the only therapy is a gluten-free diet, which can be very challenging. Gastroenterologists at Rush University Medical Center are conducting a newly released study to see if mind/body techniques could help patients with celiac disease adhere to the very strict diet. Celiac disease is a lifelong, digestive disease affecting children and adults. People who have celiac disease cannot........Go to the GI news blog (Added on 1/12/2010 8:49:35 AM)


'Weekend Effect' Makes People Happier

'Weekend Effect' Makes People Happier
From construction laborers and secretaries to physicians and lawyers, people experience better moods, greater vitality, and fewer aches and pains from Friday evening to Sunday afternoon, concludes the first study of daily mood variation in employed adults to be reported in the January 2010 issue of the Journal of Social and Clinical Psychology. And that 'weekend effect' is largely linked to the freedom to choose one's activities and the........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 1/12/2010 8:38:56 AM)


Why migraine headaches get worse with light exposure?

Why migraine headaches get worse with light exposure?
BOSTON Ask anyone who suffers from migraine headaches what they do when they're having an attack, and you're likely to hear "go into a dark room." And eventhough it's long been known that light makes migraines worse, the reason why has been unclear. Now researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) have identified a new visual pathway that underlies sensitivity to light during migraine in both blind individuals and in........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 1/11/2010 8:00:09 AM)


Genetic research related to ankylosing spondylitis

Genetic research related to ankylosing spondylitis
Work done in part by scientists at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston has led to the discovery of two new genes that are implicated in ankylosing spondylitis (AS), an inflammatory and potentially disabling disease. In addition, the international research team pinpointed two areas along stretches of DNA that play an important role in regulating gene activity linked to the arthritic condition. The findings, a critical........Go to the Rheumatology news blog (Added on 1/11/2010 7:47:18 AM)


Increasing sonogram use in pregnant women

Increasing sonogram use in pregnant women
Current use of prenatal ultrasounds in women with singleton pregnancies is 55% greater than in 1996, even in low-risk pregnancies. More than one-third (37%) of pregnant women now receive 3 or more ultrasound tests in the second and third trimesters of a given pregnancy, found an article http://www.cmaj.ca/embargo/cmaj090979.pdf in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) www.cmaj.ca. The increase in the use of multiple ultrasound scans per........Go to the OBGYN news blog (Added on 1/6/2010 8:10:33 AM)


Psychological debriefing in schools after traumatic events

Psychological debriefing in schools after traumatic events
There is no evidence to support psychological debriefing in schools after traumatic events such as violence, suicides and accidental death, which runs counter to current practice in some Canadian school jurisdictions, as per a commentary http://www.cmaj.ca/embargo/cmaj091621.pdf in CMAJ (Canadian Medical Association Journal) www.cmaj.ca. Recent systematic reviews indicate that psychological debriefing of adults does not prevent........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 1/6/2010 8:07:47 AM)


 

Childhood clues to adult schizophrenia

Childhood clues to adult schizophrenia
Years before adults develop schizophrenia, there is a pattern of cognitive difficulties they experience as children, including problems with verbal reasoning, working memory, attention and processing speed. Drawing on a long-term study of more than 1,000 New Zealanders born from 1972 to 1973, a team led by Duke scientists has found a consistent pattern of developmental difficulties that first appeared when adult study subjects with........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 1/22/2010 8:22:52 AM)


How to Live Your Life Twice

How to Live Your Life Twice
Elliot Jacques coined the term "mid-life crisis" 40 years ago, when the average lifespan was 70 and "mid-life" came at age 35. Individuals could expect their quality of life to decline from that point forward, Jacques argued, so some extreme reactions to encroaching mortality were to be expected, such as having extra-marital affairs and buying a Corvette. Not any more, says Prof. Carlo Strenger of Tel Aviv University's Department of........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 1/22/2010 8:15:33 AM)


Older brains make good use of 'useless' information

Older brains make good use of 'useless' information
Toronto A newly released study has observed promising evidence that the older brain's weakened ability to filter out irrelevant information may actually give aging adults a memory advantage over their younger counterparts. A long line of research has already shown that aging is linked to a decreased ability to tune out irrelevant information. Now researchers at Baycrest's world-renowned Rotman Research Institute have demonstrated that when........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 1/21/2010 8:22:48 AM)


Herpes medication does not reduce risk of HIV transmission

Herpes medication does not reduce risk of HIV transmission
A five-year international multi-center clinical trial has observed that acyclovir, a drug widely used as a safe and effective therapy taken twice daily to suppress herpes simplex virus-2 (HSV-2), which is the most common cause of genital herpes, does not reduce the risk of HIV transmission when taken by people infected with both HIV and HSV-2. The results of the study are reported in the New England Journal (NEJM) online today, and will appear........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 1/21/2010 8:20:56 AM)


Stain repellent may cause thyroid disease

Stain repellent may cause thyroid disease
A study by the University of Exeter and the Peninsula Medical School for the first time links thyroid disease with human exposure to perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA). PFOA is a persistent organic chemical used in industrial and consumer goods including nonstick cookware and stain- and water-resistant coatings for carpets and fabrics. Reported in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives, The study revealed that people with higher........Go to the ENT news blog (Added on 1/21/2010 8:18:12 AM)


Risks And Benefits of Bariatric Surgery

Risks And Benefits of Bariatric Surgery
A computerized model suggests that most morbidly obese individuals would likely live longer if they had gastric bypass surgery, as per a report in the recent issue of Archives of Surgery, one of the JAMA/Archives journals. However, the best decision for individual patients varies based on factors such as age, increasing body mass index and the effectiveness of surgery. An estimated 5.1 percent of the U.S. population is morbidly obese, often........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 1/19/2010 8:37:10 AM)


Costs of psoriasis treatment

Costs of psoriasis treatment
Findings from a cost model suggest that expenses for systemic psoriasis treatment appear to be increasing at a faster rate than inflation, and newer biologically derived therapys are more expensive than traditional systemic therapies, as per a report in the recent issue of Archives of Dermatology, one of the JAMA/Archives journals. Psoriasis is a chronic autoimmune disease that affects an estimated 4.5 million to 7.5 million Americans,........Go to the Skin news blog (Added on 1/19/2010 8:35:45 AM)


Would you experience appendicitis?

Would you experience appendicitis?
Would you experience appendicitis?. And if you do, is it necessarily an emergency that demands immediate surgery? Yes and no, as per a newly released study by UT Southwestern Medical Center surgeons and physicians. The scientists reviewed data over a 36-year period from the National Hospital Discharge Survey and concluded in a paper appearing in the recent issue of Archives of Surgery that appendicitis appears to be caused by........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 1/19/2010 8:20:38 AM)


Concussions not taken seriously enough

Concussions not taken seriously enough
Despite growing public interest in concussions because of serious hockey injuries or skiing deaths, a researcher from McMaster University has observed that we may not be taking the common head injury seriously enough. In a study to be reported in the recent issue of the journal Pediatrics, Carol DeMatteo, an associate clinical professor in the School of Rehabilitation Science, observed that children who receive the concussion label spend........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 1/18/2010 8:08:52 AM)


Mechanism for the Proliferation of Epstein-Barr Virus

Mechanism for the Proliferation of Epstein-Barr Virus
Researchers of Helmholtz Zentrum München have elucidated a crucial mechanism in the lytic cycle of Epstein-Barr virus. A team of scientists led by Professor Wolfgang Hammerschmidt identified the function of a protein which plays a critical role in the proliferation of the virus. The Epstein-Barr virus can induce cancer. The findings, reported in the current issue of the renowned journal PNAS, represent a major step forward in understanding........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 1/15/2010 8:16:08 AM)


Some antiviral drugs may make diseases worse

Some antiviral drugs may make diseases worse
As the flu season continues in full-swing, most people can appreciate the need for drugs that stop viruses after they take hold in the body. Despite this serious need for new drugs, a team of scientists from the University of Texas at Austin raise serious concerns about an emerging strategy for stopping viral infections. As per their research report appearing in the January 2010 issue of the journal GENETICS, medications that cause viruses to........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 1/14/2010 8:12:53 AM)


Eye test could detect Alzheimer's

Eye test could detect Alzheimer's
A simple and inexpensive eye test could aid detection and diagnosis of major neurological diseases such as Alzheimer's at an earlier stage than is currently possible, as per new research by UCL scientists. The research, led by Professors Francesca Cordeiro & Stephen Moss and published recently in Cell Death & Disease, demonstrates a new technique that enables retinal, and therefore brain cell death, to be directly measured in real time. The........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 1/14/2010 7:50:49 AM)


Hypertension Linked to Dementia

Hypertension Linked to Dementia
Older women with high blood pressure are at increased risk for developing brain lesions that cause dementia during the later part of life, as per data from the Women's Health Initiative Memory Study (WHIMS). The findings were reported in the December 2009 online issue of the Journal of Clinical Hypertension. The research was conducted as part of the Women' Health Initiative (WHI), the largest multi-site longitudinal study looking at health........Go to the Heart-watch-blog (Added on 1/13/2010 8:23:52 AM)


ADHD: Disconnect Between Brain Regions

ADHD: Disconnect Between Brain Regions
Two brain areas fail to connect when children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder attempt a task that measures attention, as per scientists at the UC Davis Center for Mind and Brain and M.I.N.D. Institute. "This is the first time that we have direct evidence that this connectivity is missing in ADHD," said Ali Mazaheri, postdoctoral researcher at the Center for Mind and Brain. Mazaheri and colleagues made the discovery by analyzing........Go to the Pediatric news blog (Added on 1/12/2010 8:56:43 AM)


Sticking to diets is about more than willpower

Sticking to diets is about more than willpower
A number of people think the success of dieting, seemingly a national obsession following the excesses and resolutions of the holiday season, depends mostly on how hard one tries -- on willpower and dedication. While this does matter, new research has observed that a much more subtle aspect of the diets themselves can also have a big influence on the pounds shed -- namely, the perceived complexity of a diet plan's rules and requirements. ........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 1/12/2010 8:40:20 AM)


Calcium and taste perception

Calcium and taste perception
Calcium may not come to mind when you think of tasty foods, but in a study appearing in the January 8 issue of JBC, Japanese scientists have provided the first demonstration that calcium channels on the tongue are the targets of compounds that can enhance taste. In addition to molecules that directly trigger specific taste buds (salty, sweet etc.), there are other substances which have no flavor of their own but can enhance the flavors they........Go to the Research news blog (Added on 1/11/2010 8:16:13 AM)


Autism is a brain 'connectivity' disorder

Autism is a brain 'connectivity' disorder
Studying a rare disorder known as tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC), scientists at Children's Hospital Boston add to a growing body of evidence suggesting that autism spectrum disorders, which affect 25 to 50 percent of TSC patients, result from a miswiring of connections in the developing brain, leading to improper information flow. The finding may also help explain why a number of people with TSC have seizures and intellectual disabilities.........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 1/11/2010 7:51:14 AM)


Repairing a defective alcohol metabolism enzyme

Repairing a defective alcohol metabolism enzyme
An experimental compound repaired a defective alcohol metabolism enzyme that affects an estimated 1 billion people worldwide, as per research supported by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA). The findings, published Jan. 10, 2010 in the advance online edition of Nature Structural and Molecular Biology, suggest the possibility of a therapy to reduce the health problems linked to the enzyme defect. "This intriguing........Go to the Research news blog (Added on 1/11/2010 7:49:58 AM)


A lifetime of inactivity

A lifetime of inactivity
Humiliation in physical education class as a child can turn people off fitness for good, as per a University of Alberta researcher. Billy Strean, a professor in the U of A's Faculty of Physical Education and Recreation, says a negative lifelong attitude towards physical activity can be determined by either a good or a bad experience, based on the personal characteristics of the coach or instructor. For example, negative experiences may come........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 1/6/2010 4:24:53 PM)


Childhood trauma may cause migraine

Childhood trauma may cause migraine
Scientists from the American Headache Society's Women's Issues Section Research Consortium observed that occurence rate of childhood maltreatment, particularly emotional abuse and neglect, are prevalent in migraine patients. The study also observed that migraineurs reporting childhood emotional or physical abuse and/or neglect had a significantly higher number of comorbid pain conditions compared with those without a history of maltreatment.........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 1/6/2010 7:49:11 AM)


 

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Oncologist: Physician or surgeon who had specialized in the treatment of cancer. Medical oncologists usually treat patients with chemotherapy, hormonal therapy and biological therapy, radiation oncologists treat cancer with radiation therapy and surgical oncologists treat patients with surgery. See cancer terms for more cancer related terms.

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