MedicineWorld.Org
Your gateway to the world of medicine
Home
News
Cancer News
About Us
Cancer
Health Professionals
Patients and public
Contact Us
Disclaimer

MedicineWorld.Org: Archive page

New article alert RSS content feed What is RSS feed?
Be the first one to read news and information.
Subscribe to our RSS feed


Back to main page
Suggest Your News Item for Inclusion

Feeling your words

Feeling your words
The movement of facial skin and muscles around the mouth plays an important role not only in the way the sounds of speech are made, but also in the way they are heard as per a research studyby researchers at Haskins Laboratories, a Yale-affiliated research laboratory. "How your own face is moving makes a difference in how you 'hear' what you hear," said first author Takayuki Ito, a senior scientist at Haskins. When, Ito and colleagues........Go to the ENT news blog (Added on 1/26/2009 6:23:42 AM)


Genes and psoriasis

Genes and psoriasis
Researchers at the Genome Institute of Singapore (GIS) and the Anhui Medical University, China, have identified genes that play an important role in the development of psoriasis, a common chronic skin disease. The research, led by GIS Human Genetics Group Leader and Associate Prof. Liu Jianjun, will be published online on 25 Jan. 2009 in the journal Nature Genetics Studying genetic variants in the human genomes of a large cohort of........Go to the Skin news blog (Added on 1/26/2009 6:17:05 AM)


What causes breast cancer on the other side?

What causes breast cancer on the other side?
HOUSTON - A preventive procedure to remove the unaffected breast in patients with breast cancer with disease in one breast may only be necessary in patients who have high-risk features as assessed by examining the patient's medical history and pathology of the breast cancer, as per scientists at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center. Their findings, reported in the March 1, 2009 issue of Cancer, may help physicians predict the........Go to the Breast-cancer-blog (Added on 1/26/2009 6:08:38 AM)


How some chemotherapy drugs block growth of blood vessels

How some chemotherapy drugs block growth of blood vessels
Scientists at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine have discovered how a whole class of usually used chemotherapy drugs can block cancer growth. Their findings, reported online this week at the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences Early Edition, suggest that a subgroup of cancer patients might especially benefit from these drugs. The anthracycline class of chemotherapeutics doxorubicin (Adriamycin), daunorubicin,........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 1/23/2009 6:17:16 AM)


Do video games make you socially crippled?

Do video games make you socially crippled?
A newly released study connects young adults' use of video games to poorer relationships with friends and family and the student co-author expresses disappointment at his own findings. Brigham Young University undergrad Alex Jensen and his faculty mentor, Laura Walker, publish their results Jan. 23 in the Journal of Youth and Adolescence The research is based on information collected from 813 college students around the country. As the........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 1/23/2009 6:06:35 AM)


Novel target for treating arrhythmias

Novel target for treating arrhythmias
Abnormal heart rhythms arrhythmias are killers. They strike without warning, causing sudden cardiac death, which accounts for about 10 percent of all deaths in the United States. Vanderbilt researchers have discovered a new molecular mechanism linked to arrhythmias. Their findings, reported in The Journal of Clinical Investigation, could lead to novel arrhythmia therapys. "The current antiarrhythmic drugs do not prolong life," said Bjrn........Go to the Heart-watch-blog (Added on 1/21/2009 10:59:39 PM)


Altered brain activity in schizophrenia

Altered brain activity in schizophrenia
Schizophrenia may blur the boundary between internal and external realities by overactivating a brain system that is involved in self-reflection, and thus causing an exaggerated focus on self, a new MIT and Harvard brain imaging study has observed. The traditional view of schizophrenia is that the disturbed thoughts, perceptions and emotions that characterize the disease are caused by disconnections among the brain regions that control these........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 1/21/2009 10:54:10 PM)


What your mother ate?

What your mother ate?
In the United States, there has been a recent dramatic rise in the number of children classified as obese and diagnosed with obesity-related diseases, such as type 2 diabetes and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). One factor thought to contribute to this rise is obesity of the mother during pregnancy. However, a team of researchers, at Oregon Health and Science University, Beaverton, and the University of Colorado School of Medicine,. ........Go to the OBGYN news blog (Added on 1/20/2009 6:29:15 AM)


Providing support to psoriasis patients

Providing support to psoriasis patients
Online support communities appear to offer both a valuable educational resource and a source of psychological and social support for individuals with psoriasis, as per a report in the recent issue of Archives of Dermatology, one of the JAMA/Archives journals. "Psoriasis currently affects approximately 0.6 percent to 4.8 percent of the world's population," as per background information in the article. In addition to causing skin and joint........Go to the Skin news blog (Added on 1/20/2009 6:24:06 AM)


Resistance to antibiotic on the rise

Resistance to antibiotic on the rise
A report by scientists in the Jan. 19, 2009 Archives of Otolaryngology-Head and Neck Surgery shows that there was nationwide increase in the prevalence of pediatric methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) head and neck infections from January 2001 to December 2006. The increase in antibiotic-resistant infections has become a big concern for scientists and clinicians over the years. MRSA was once a condition that was only found in........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 1/20/2009 6:17:28 AM)


Turning those tumor suppressor genes on

Turning those tumor suppressor genes on
Scientists at Mayo Clinic have observed that the experimental drug they are testing to treat a deadly form of thyroid cancer turns on a powerful tumor suppressor capable of halting cell growth. Few other cancer drugs have this property, they say. In the Feb. 15 issue of Cancer Research (available online Jan. 20), they report that RS5444, being tested in a Phase 1/2 clinical trial to treat anaplastic thyroid cancer, might be useful for........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 1/20/2009 6:14:50 AM)


Fingerprints of domestic violence

Fingerprints of domestic violence
Women who are victims of intimate partner violence tend to have different patterns of facial injury than women who experience facial trauma from other causes, as per a report in the January/recent issue of Archives of Facial Plastic Surgery, one of the JAMA/Archives journals. This information, and other key characteristics such as a delay before visiting a health care facility, could help surgeons and other physicians recognize patients who are........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 1/19/2009 11:52:43 PM)


Stimulating the brain to improve motor skills

Stimulating the brain to improve motor skills
People who received a mild electrical current to a motor control area of the brain were significantly better able to learn and perform a complex motor task than those in control groups. The findings could hold promise for enhancing rehabilitation for people with traumatic brain injury, stroke and other conditions. The study is presented in the January 20, 2009 early online edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, and........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 1/19/2009 11:45:18 PM)


Sixty million walk around with deadly heart disease mutation

Sixty million walk around with deadly heart disease mutation
Heart disease is the number one killer in the world and India carries more than its share of this burden. Moreover, the problem is set to rise: it is predicted that by 2010 India's population will suffer approximately 60% of the world's heart disease. Today, an international team of 25 researchers from four countries provides a clue to why this is so: 1% of the world's population carries a mutation almost guaranteed to lead to heart problems........Go to the Heart-watch-blog (Added on 1/19/2009 6:23:11 AM)


Some genetic mutations and childhood obesity

Some genetic mutations and childhood obesity
Three new genetic variations that increase the risk of obesity are revealed in a newly released study, published recently in the journal Nature Genetics The authors suggest that if each acted independently, these variants could be responsible for up to 50% of cases of severe obesity. Together with existing research, the new findings should ultimately provide the tools to predict which young children are at risk of becoming obese. Health........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 1/19/2009 6:15:57 AM)


Inner secrets of the bleeding heart

Inner secrets of the bleeding heart
Images that for the first time show bleeding inside the heart after people have suffered a heart attack have been captured by scientists, in a newly released study published recently in the journal Radiology The research shows that the amount of bleeding can indicate how damaged a person's heart is after a heart attack. The researchers, from the MRC Clinical Sciences Centre at Imperial College London, hope that this kind of imaging will be........Go to the Kidney watch blog (Added on 1/19/2009 6:10:12 AM)


What is the key to a healthy lifestyle?

What is the key to a healthy lifestyle?
The main factors influencing the amount of physical exercise people carry out are their self-perceived ability and the extent of their desire to exercise. A study of 5167 Canadians, published in the open access journal BMC Public Health, has shown that psychological concerns are the most important barriers to an active lifestyle. Sai Yi Pan, from the Public Health Agency of Canada, led a team of scientists who carried out a study which........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 1/15/2009 7:18:14 PM)


Eye injuries caused by paintballs

Eye injuries caused by paintballs
Paintballs can cause severe and 'visually devastating' eye injuries, particularly when used in unsupervised settings without proper eye protection, reports a study in the recent issue of the American Journal of Ophthalmology (www.AJO.com), published by Elsevier. "Eye injuries secondary to high-velocity paintballs can cause tremendous damage to vital ocular structures often requiring extensive surgical intervention," comments Dr. Kyle J.........Go to the Ophthalmology news blog (Added on 1/15/2009 7:08:54 PM)


How aging undermines bone healing

How aging undermines bone healing
Scientists have unraveled crucial details of how aging causes broken bones to heal slowly, or not at all, as per study results published recently in the Journal of Bone and Mineral Research The research team also successfully conducted preclinical tests on a potential new class of therapys designed to "rescue" healing capability lost to aging. In the worst cases, an age-related delay in healing keeps the two sides of a fractured bone from........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 1/15/2009 7:01:51 PM)


Dementia in the environment of universal health care

Dementia in the environment of universal health care
A newly released study has observed that in spite of their universal health care system which facilitates access to free dementia care, elderly adults in the United Kingdom are less willing to undergo dementia screening than their counterparts in the U.S. because the Britons perceive greater societal stigma from diagnosis of the disease than do Americans. Scientists surveyed 125 elderly adults in Indianapolis and 120 elderly adults in Kent,........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 1/15/2009 6:45:23 PM)


 

Brain's memory 'buffer' in single cells

Brain's memory 'buffer' in single cells
Individual nerve cells in the front part of the brain can hold traces of memories on their own for as long as a minute and possibly longer, scientists at UT Southwestern Medical Center have found. The study, available online and appearing in the recent issue of Nature Neuroscience, is the first to identify the specific signal that establishes nonpermanent cellular memory and reveals how the brain holds temporary information. It has........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 1/26/2009 6:21:03 AM)


Reducing risk of childhood leukemia

Reducing risk of childhood leukemia
A study led by Dr Marcus Cooke at the University of Leicester and funded by World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF) UK is looking at whether consuming caffeine during pregnancy might affect the unborn baby's risk of developing leukaemia in childhood. Dr Cooke sees the study as a unique opportunity to determine the sources of chromosomal alterations during pregnancy, with the ultimate aim of reducing the risk of childhood leukaemias. Leukaemia........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 1/26/2009 6:19:02 AM)


Shoulder injuries in high school athletes

Shoulder injuries in high school athletes
(COLUMBUS, Ohio)Eventhough shoulder injuries accounted for just 8 percent of all injuries sustained by high school athletes, shoulder injuries were relatively common in predominately male sports such as baseball (18 percent of all injuries), wrestling (18 percent) and football (12 percent). Moreover, boys experienced higher shoulder injury rates than girls, especially in soccer and baseball/softball. Player-to-player contact was linked to........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 1/26/2009 6:10:57 AM)


Better methods to quit smoking

Better methods to quit smoking
Scientists from the UK Centre for Tobacco Control Studies led by Dr Linda Bauld at Bath, along with colleagues from the University of Glasgow, have published research in the recent issue of Addiction journal comparing the success and cost-effectiveness of two types of stop smoking support services offered by the NHS. These are community-based group stop smoking support and one-to-one support provided in a pharmacy setting. The study, funded........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 1/23/2009 6:28:17 AM)


Sleep Apnea may lead to diabetes

Sleep Apnea may lead to diabetes
In a study that addressed the issue of insulin sensitivity with respect to sleep disordered breathing (SDB), Naresh Punjabi, M.D., Ph.D. sought to examine the relationship between SDB and insulin resistance using the best tools at his disposal to do so. The results definitively link SDB to pre-diabetic changes in insulin production and glucose metabolism. It was reported in the first issue for February of the American Journal of Respiratory........Go to the Diabetic news blog (Added on 1/23/2009 6:09:59 AM)


Smoking with most male cancer deaths

Smoking with most male cancer deaths
The association between tobacco smoke and cancer deaths beyond lung cancer deaths has been strengthened by a recent study from a UC Davis researcher, suggesting that increased tobacco control efforts could save more lives than previously estimated. The epidemiological analysis, published online in BMC Cancer, linked smoking to more than 70 percent of the cancer death burden among Massachusetts men in 2003. This percentage is much higher........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 1/21/2009 11:06:28 PM)


Is genetic theory of inheritance incorrect?

Is genetic theory of inheritance incorrect?
Scientists at the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) have detected evidence that DNA may not be the only carrier of heritable information; a secondary molecular mechanism called epigenetics may also account for some inherited traits and diseases. These findings challenge the fundamental principles of genetics and inheritance, and potentially provide a new insight into the primary causes of human diseases. Your mother's eyes, your........Go to the Research news blog (Added on 1/20/2009 7:28:40 PM)


Socially active and not easily stressed?

Socially active and not easily stressed?
A newly released study shows that people who are socially active and not easily stressed appears to be less likely to develop dementia. The research is reported in the January 20, 2009, print issue of Neurology, the medical journal of the American Academy of Neurology. The study involves 506 older people who did not have dementia when first examined. The group was given questionnaires about their personality traits and lifestyle. The........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 1/20/2009 7:25:14 PM)


The severity of first heart attacks

The severity of first heart attacks
The severity of first heart attacks has dropped significantly in the United States - propelling a decline in coronary heart disease deaths, scientists reported in Circulation: Journal of the American Heart Association. "This landmark study suggests that better prevention and better management in the hospital have contributed to the reduction in deaths," said Merle Myerson, M.D., Ed.D., main author of the study, heart specialist and director........Go to the Heart-watch-blog (Added on 1/20/2009 6:26:50 AM)


Our microbes, ourselves

Our microbes, ourselves
In terms of diversity and sheer numbers, the microbes occupying the human gut easily dwarf the billions of people inhabiting the Earth. Numbering in the tens of trillions and representing a number of thousands of distinct genetic families, this microbiome, as it's called, helps the body perform a variety of regulatory and digestive functions, a number of still poorly understood. How this microbial mlange appears to be associated with body........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 1/20/2009 6:20:44 AM)


People on low-carb diets more effectively burn fat

People on low-carb diets more effectively burn fat
People on low-carbohydrate diets are more dependent on the oxidation of fat in the liver for energy than those on a low-calorie diet, scientists at UT Southwestern Medical Center have found in a small clinical study. The findings, reported in the journal Hepatology, could have implications for treating obesity and related diseases such as diabetes, insulin resistance and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, said Dr. Jeffrey Browning, assistant........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 1/20/2009 6:11:19 AM)


Who with lung cancer live longer?

Who with lung cancer live longer?
Disparities in survival among black patients diagnosed with early-stage lung cancer are not seen when patients are recommended appropriate therapy, as per a report in the recent issue of Archives of Surgery, one of the JAMA/Archives journals. Lung cancer causes more deaths in the United States than any other cancer, as per background information in the article. Pulmonary resectionor surgery to remove a portion of the lungprovides the best........Go to the Lung-cancer-blog (Added on 1/19/2009 11:50:49 PM)


About those food ads in the magazine

About those food ads in the magazine
In the first-ever study of food adverts in UK magazines, scientists found them filled with sugary, salt-filled options often contradicting the health messages the articles were trying to put across. "Nearly every magazine contains advice on a healthier lifestyle, yet we found the food adverts were for products high in sugar and salt and low in fibre such as ready meals, sauces and confectionary," explains Dr Jean Adams, lecturer in public........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 1/19/2009 11:48:26 PM)


Does water pollution cause male infertility?

Does water pollution cause male infertility?
New research strengthens the link between water pollution and rising male fertility problems. The study, by Brunel University, the Universities of Exeter and Reading and the Centre for Ecology & Hydrology, shows for the first time how a group of testosterone-blocking chemicals is finding its way into UK rivers, affecting wildlife and potentially humans. The research was supported by the Natural Environment Research Council and is now reported........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 1/19/2009 6:18:02 AM)


Progress in cancer treatment

Progress in cancer treatment
Dr. Andr Veillette, a researcher at the Institut de recherches cliniques de Montral (IRCM), and his team led by postdoctoral fellow Dr. Mario-Ernesto Cruz-Munoz, will publish in the upcoming issue of the prestigious journal Nature Immunology of Nature Publishing Group. This discovery could have a significant impact on the therapy of cancers and infectious diseases. Current therapys frequently achieve only limited results with these types of........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 1/19/2009 6:13:42 AM)


Spread the net

Spread the net
Every thirty seconds a child dies of malaria. It has just become a statistic. Millions of people around the world are being affected by this deadly disease and until recently little was done to provide relief. Spread The Net, spearheaded by Rick Mercer and Belinda Stronach, is a campaign geared toward raising money for a simple solution: bednets. Bednets are perhaps the most effective method of combating malaria, protecting a child in their sleep for up to five years.

Students from all across Canada have been asked to show their support to this cause by raising awareness and promoting this campaign. Now we ask for your aid in furthering this unique student effort, by donating to this campaign and giving a child the gift of hope. Just 10 bucks can help save a life. The following is a link to donate to the campaign in the official Spread The Net Website
Go to the society news blog (Added on 1/15/2009 8:16:00 PM)


Genes and pancreatic cancer

Genes and pancreatic cancer
Abnormalities in genes that repair mistakes in DNA replication may help identify people who are at high risk of developing pancreas cancer, a research team from The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center reports in the Jan. 15 issue of Clinical Cancer Research Defects in these critical DNA repair genes may act alone or in combination with traditional risk factors known to increase an individual's likelihood of being diagnosed with........Go to the Pancreatic cancer blog (Added on 1/15/2009 7:16:00 PM)


Seniors with disabilities may get help from alcohol

Seniors with disabilities may get help from alcohol
It is well known that moderate drinking can have positive health benefits for instance, a couple of glasses of red wine a day can be good for the heart. But if you're a senior in good health, light to moderate consumption of alcohol may also help prevent the development of physical disability. That's the conclusion of a new UCLA study, available in the online edition of the American Journal of Epidemiology, which observed that light to........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 1/15/2009 7:13:21 PM)


Exercise in post-menopausal women reduces breast cancer risk

Exercise in post-menopausal women reduces breast cancer risk
Several studies had previously suggested that regular physical exercise reduces the breast cancer risk of women. However, it had been unknowned just how much exercise women should take in which period in life in order to benefit from this protective effect. Moreover, little was known about which particular type of breast cancer is influenced by physical activity. Answers to these questions are now provided by the results of the MARIE study,........Go to the Breast-cancer-blog (Added on 1/15/2009 6:55:31 PM)


Does increasing taxes on alcohol slow down drinking?

Does increasing taxes on alcohol slow down drinking?
With a number of local and national governments presently considering proposals to hike alcohol taxes, a newly released study published online in the February edition of Addiction journal finds that the higher the alcohol prices less likely people will drink. And when they do drink, they drink less. After analyzing 112 studies spanning nearly four decades, scientists documented a concrete association between the amount of alcohol people drink........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 1/15/2009 6:52:30 PM)


 

Older Blog Entries   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9   10   11   12   13   14   15   16   17   18   19   20   21   22   23   24   25   26   27   28   29   30   31   32   33   34   35   36   37   38   39   40   41   42   43   44   45   46   47   48   49   50   51   52   53   54   55   56   57   58   59   60   61   62   63   64   65   66   67   68   69   70   71   72   73   74   75   76   77  
If you wish to publish an article in your name, email us.

Cancer terms:
Oncologist: Physician or surgeon who had specialized in the treatment of cancer. Medical oncologists usually treat patients with chemotherapy, hormonal therapy and biological therapy, radiation oncologists treat cancer with radiation therapy and surgical oncologists treat patients with surgery. See cancer terms for more cancer related terms.

Medicineworld.org: Main Page

Other resources   

Copyright statement
The contents of this web page are protected. Legal action may follow for reproduction of materials without permission.