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Missing protein may be key to autism

Missing protein may be key to autism
A missing brain protein may be one of the culprits behind autism and other brain disorders, as per scientists at MIT's Picower Institute for Learning and Memory. The protein, called CASK, helps in the development of synapses, which neurons use to communicate with one another and which underlie our ability to learn and remember. Improperly formed synapses could lead to mental retardation, and mutations in genes encoding certain synaptic........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 12/10/2007 10:28:41 PM)

Patients, dentists differ on smile ratings

Patients, dentists differ on smile ratings
People rate their smiles higher than dentists do, as per a new study. Teeth and eyes rated as the most important features of an attractive face, the study also found, and people younger than age 50 were most satisfied with their smiles. The study, published in this months Journal of the American Dental Association (JADA), asked 78 patients in Norway to rate their own smiles on a 100-point satisfaction scale. Later, the patients regular........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 12/10/2007 9:37:59 PM)

New strategy for developing antidepressants

New strategy for developing antidepressants
Scientists may be able to develop an antidepressant which takes effect almost immediately by directly targeting novel molecules in the brain instead of taking a less direct route, which can lead to longer times for medicine to take effect, as per a new study presented at the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology (ACNP) annual meeting. The antidepressant is also believed to be effective in people for whom prior therapys have been........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 12/9/2007 5:25:16 PM)

Homosexuality is biological but not hard-wired

Homosexuality is biological but not hard-wired
While the biological basis for homosexuality remains a mystery, a team of neurobiologists reports they may have closed in on an answer -- by a nose. The team led by University of Illinois at Chicago researcher David Featherstone has discovered that sexual orientation in fruit flies is controlled by a previously unknown regulator of synapse strength. Armed with this knowledge, the scientists found they were able to use either genetic........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 12/9/2007 5:19:55 PM)

Oblimersen combination improves survival of CLL

Oblimersen combination improves survival of CLL
Relapsed chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients who had a complete response to combination treatment that included the drug oblimersen survived significantly longer than patients treated with chemotherapy alone, a team led by scientists at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center reports at the 49th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Hematology. Patients who achieved a complete response with oblimersen have survived........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 12/9/2007 5:06:29 PM)

Vaccine improves outcome leukemia patients

Vaccine improves outcome leukemia patients
Patients whose immune system responded to a peptide vaccine for leukemia enjoyed a median remission that was more than three times longer than non-responders, a team led by scientists at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center reports at the 49th Annual Meeting of the American Society of Hematology. Immune response to the PR1 vaccine was linked to an 8.7 month event-free survival compared with 2.4 months for non-responders.........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 12/9/2007 5:01:56 PM)

Diet, gardening and lung cancer risk

Diet, gardening and lung cancer risk
By simply eating four or more servings of green salad a week and working in the garden once or twice a week, smokers and nonsmokers alike may be able to substantially reduce the risk of developing lung cancer, say scientists at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center. "This is the first risk prediction model to examine the effects of diet and physical activity on the possibility of developing lung cancer," says Michele R.........Go to the Lung-cancer-blog (Added on 12/7/2007 9:23:22 PM)

Software for detection of infectious disease outbreaks

Software for detection of infectious disease outbreaks
A newly released software program will let health authorities at the site of an infectious disease outbreak quickly analyze data, speeding the detection of new cases and the implementation of effective interventions. The program, called TranStat, was developed by a team of epidemiologists and computer researchers from the Models of Infectious Disease Agent Study (MIDAS), an international program supported by the National Institutes of Health........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 12/6/2007 7:56:15 PM)

Fresh-cut produce washing practices

Fresh-cut produce washing practices
Scientists at the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) recently examined the safety and quality of "wash techniques" used in the production of packaged produce. The study, reported in the October 2007 issue of HortScience, simulated washing techniques to learn more about how industry practices affect quality and safety of pre-cut lettuce. Yaguang Luo, PhD, Research Food Technologist at the United States Department of Agriculture's........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 12/6/2007 3:21:58 PM)

Waistline growth on high-carb diets

Waistline growth on high-carb diets
Experts have been warning for years that foods loaded with high-fructose corn syrup and other processed carbohydrates are making us fatter. Now, a University of Wisconsin-Madison study has uncovered the genetic basis for why this is so. Writing in the recent issue of Cell Metabolism, a team led by biochemistry and nutritional sciences professor James Ntambi reports that a gene in the liver, called SCD-1, is what causes mice to gain weight on........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 12/4/2007 10:40:29 PM)

Common treatments for sinus infections may not work

Common treatments for sinus infections may not work
A comparison of common therapys for acute sinusitis that included an antibiotic and a topical steroid found neither more effective than placebo, as per a research studyin the December 5 issue of JAMA. Acute sinusitis (sinus infection) is a common clinical problem with symptoms similar to other illnesses, and is often diagnosed and treated without clinical confirmation. Despite the clinical uncertainty as to a bacterial cause, antibiotic........Go to the ENT news blog (Added on 12/4/2007 10:33:00 PM)

Transcendental meditation reduces high blood pressure

Transcendental meditation reduces high blood pressure
People with hypertension may find relief from Transcendental Meditation, as per a definitive new meta-analysis of 107 published studies on stress reduction programs and high blood pressure, which would be reported in the recent issue of Current High blood pressure Reports. The Transcendental Meditation technique produces a statistically significant reduction in hypertension that is not found with other forms of relaxation, meditation,........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 12/4/2007 10:11:00 PM)

Protein controls blood vessel formation

Protein controls blood vessel formation
After an injury, the body grows new blood vessels to repair damaged tissue. But sometimes too much growth causes problems, as when new blood vessels in the eyes leak, causing diabetic retinopathy and blindness if not treated. A protein called CIB1 discovered by scientists at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill School of Medicine appears to play a major role in controlling new blood vessel growth, offering a target for drug........Go to the Research news blog (Added on 12/4/2007 9:48:41 PM)

Out-of-hours doctors reluctant to do home visits

Out-of-hours doctors reluctant to do home visits
Patients feel that doctors providing out-of-hours services in primary care are reluctant to do home visits, shows a small study of patients experiences in Quality and Safety in Health Care. Scientists held group discussions and carried out telephone interviews with 27 patients who had recently used one of three services providing general practice cover in the evenings and weekends in England. Under the new GP contract, which came into........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 12/2/2007 9:24:01 PM)

Nurses working extended shifts

Nurses working extended shifts
Hospital staff nurses who work extended hours, work at night, struggle to remain awake at work, or obtain less sleep are more likely to experience a drowsy driving episode, as per a research studyreported in the December 1 issue of the journal SLEEP. The study, authored by Linda D. Scott, PhD, of Grand Valley State University in Grand Rapids, Mich., focused on data that were collected from 895 full-time hospital staff nurses, who completed........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 12/2/2007 9:00:25 PM)

sleep disorders on teens' academic performance

sleep disorders on teens' academic performance
The Pediatric Daytime Sleepiness Scale (PDSS) is an independent, reliable tool in predicting the negative impact of a sleep-related breathing disorder and daytime sleepiness on a teenagers academic performance, as per a research studyreported in the December 1 issue of the journal SLEEP. The study, authored by Daniel Perez-Chada, MD, of Hospital Universitario Austral in Buenos Aires, Argentina, focused on 2,884 students, whose answers to a........Go to the Pediatric news blog (Added on 12/2/2007 8:52:23 PM)

Leading cause of death in 'preemies' might be controlled

Leading cause of death in 'preemies' might be controlled
Blocking signals from a key molecular receptor that normally switches on the intestines immune response but instead becomes too intense in the presence of stress and toxins may help reverse necrotizing enterocolitis (NEC), a leading cause of death in premature newborns, as per researchers at the American Society for Cell Biology 47th annual meeting. David J. Hackam and his laboratory team at the Childrens Hospital of Pittsburgh report that........Go to the Pediatric news blog (Added on 12/2/2007 8:42:52 PM)

Embryonic stem cell closes massive skull injury

Embryonic stem cell closes massive skull injury
There are mice in Baltimore whose skulls were made whole again by bone tissue grown from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). Healing critical-size defects (defects that would not otherwise heal on their own) in intramembraneous bone, the flat bone type that forms the skull, is a vivid demonstration of new techniques devised by researchers at John Hopkins University to use hESCs for tissue regeneration. Using mesenchymal precursor cells........Go to the Research news blog (Added on 12/2/2007 8:39:17 PM)

A real attention grabber

A real attention grabber
The person youre speaking with may be looking at you, but are they really paying attention" Or has the person covertly shifted their attention, without moving their eyes" Dr. Brian Corneil, of the Centre for Brain and Mind at The University of Western Ontario in London, Canada has found a way of actually measuring covert attention. His research Neuromuscular consequences of reflexive covert orienting is posted on the Advance Online........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 12/2/2007 8:18:54 PM)

Difficult Choice: Low-Calorie or Low Prices?

Difficult Choice: Low-Calorie or Low Prices?
High-calorie foods tend to cost less than lower-calorie items and are less likely to increase in price due to inflation a possible explanation for why the highest rates of obesity are seen among people in lower-income groups, as per scientists at the University of Washington. High-calorie foods provide the most calories at the least cost, the scientists found in a survey of more than 370 food items at three Seattle-area supermarket chains.........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 12/1/2007 6:44:37 PM)

 

Psychiatrists: Least religious but most interested

Psychiatrists: Least religious but most interested
Eventhough psychiatry experts are among the least religious physicians, they seem to be the most interested in the religious and spiritual dimensions of their patients, as per survey data reported in the recent issue of the American Journal of Psychiatry. Ever since Freud described religious faith as an illusion and a neurosis there has been tension and at times hostility between religion and psychiatry. Psychiatry experts are less religious........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 12/10/2007 10:36:27 PM)

Living Longer With Obesity Means

Living Longer With Obesity Means
Living longer with obesity can lead to both longer hospital stays and more avoidable trips to the hospital, as per two new studies from Purdue University. "Americans are overweight, and there are numerous studies that cite the problems of obesity," said Ken Ferraro, a professor of sociology. "However, as the age at which people become obese continues to get younger, we wanted to know how living longer with obesity affects people. "These........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 12/10/2007 10:26:24 PM)

Psychotherapy for post-traumatic stress disorder

Psychotherapy for post-traumatic stress disorder
When treated within a month, survivors of a psychologically traumatic event improved significantly with psychotherapy, as per a new study presented at the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology (ACNP) annual meeting. Lead researcher and ACNP member Arieh Shalev, M.D., Chair of the Department of Psychiatry and founding Director of the Center for Traumatic Stress at Hadassah University Hospital in Jerusalem, studied 248 adults with early........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 12/9/2007 5:23:48 PM)

Genetic links between cancer and schizophrenia

Genetic links between cancer and schizophrenia
A series of studies presented today at the American College of Neuropsychopharmacology (ACNP) annual meeting elucidates evidence that there is a genetic link between schizophrenia and cancer, providing a surprising possible scientific explanation for lower rates of cancer among patients with schizophrenia despite having poor diets and high rates of smoking and their parents. Scientists at the National Institute for Mental Health (NIMH)........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 12/9/2007 5:22:02 PM)

Neurons in the frontal lobe may be responsible

Neurons in the frontal lobe may be responsible
You study the menu at a restaurant and decide to order the steak rather than the salmon. But when the waiter tells you about the lobster special, you decide lobster trumps steak. Without reconsidering the salmon, you place your orderall because of a trait called transitivity. Transitivity is the hallmark of rational economic choice, says Camillo Padoa-Schioppa, a postdoctoral researcher in HMS Professor of Neurobiology John Assads lab. As........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 12/9/2007 5:18:48 PM)

Dasatinib, Nilotinib as frontline therapy for CML

Dasatinib, Nilotinib as frontline therapy for CML
Two drugs approved for use as second line treatment for chronic myelogenous leukemia are showing promising results as frontline treatment for newly diagnosed patients in two clinical trials, research teams led by researchers at The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center report at the 49th annual meeting of the American Society of Hematology. All patients in both trials have a complete cytogenetic response - absence of the aberrant........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 12/9/2007 5:13:09 PM)

More good news from Gleevec

More good news from Gleevec
Gleevec, the targeted cancer pill that has saved more than 100,000 lives, now is saving more children with a dire leukemia, as well as preventing disease progression with long term use in adults with chronic myeloid leukemia. Data at this weekends meeting continues to show how much Gleevec has completely changed the outlook for so a number of, a number of patients facing cancer, said Brian Druker, M.D., director of the OHSU Cancer........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 12/9/2007 4:58:27 PM)

New direction for chance discovery?

New direction for chance discovery?
There have been publications on the subject of chance discovery since Yukio Ohsawa proposed the concept of chance discovery in 2000, but the question arises: will the research continue in the way it is done now or shall chance discovery move towards a new direction? A special issue of the International Journal of Knowledge-Based and Intelligent Engineering Systems on the subject is being published by IOS Press in December. The issue on........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 12/6/2007 8:07:24 PM)

Miscarriage Myths Persist

Miscarriage Myths Persist
More than a third of women surveyed about their beliefs surrounding miscarriage and birth defects said they thought that a pregnant woman's foul mood could negatively affect her baby. One in four of these women thought a pregnant woman's exposure to upsetting situations could hurt her unborn child, and one in five believed excessive exercise could cause a woman to miscarry. Despite those beliefs, relatively few of the women surveyed........Go to the OBGYN news blog (Added on 12/6/2007 2:55:22 PM)

Gene that influences alcohol consumption

Gene that influences alcohol consumption
A variant of a gene involved in communication among brain cells has a direct influence on alcohol consumption in mice, as per a new study by researchers supported by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and the U.S. Army. Researchers do not know yet whether a similar gene variant, with a similar effect on alcohol consumption, exists in humans. Known as Grm7, the........Go to the Research news blog (Added on 12/5/2007 8:46:36 PM)

Why do high school seniors drink?

Why do high school seniors drink?
Most high school seniors drink because they want to experiment with alcohol, some drink for the thrill of it, and others because it helps them relax. A new study finds that a fourth group of high school students share all those reasons for drinking, but they also drink to get away from problems and to deal with anger or frustration issues. Kids with multiple reasons to drink, including reasons correlation to coping with life, show the........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 12/4/2007 10:37:03 PM)

Fitness level, not body fat

Fitness level, not body fat
Adults over age 60 who had higher levels of cardiorespiratory fitness lived longer than unfit adults, independent of their levels of body fat, as per a research studyin the December 5 issue of JAMA. Prior studies have provided evidence that obesity and physical inactivity each can produce a higher risk of death in middle-aged adults. Whether this is also true for elderly adults is uncertain, as per background information in the article. ........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 12/4/2007 10:31:28 PM)

Novel genes for schizophrenia

Novel genes for schizophrenia
Researchers at the Zucker Hillside Hospital campus of the Feinstein Institute for Medical Research have identified nine genetic markers that can increase a persons risk for schizophrenia. As per a research findings published this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the research team uncovered original evidence that this disabling brain disease can be inherited in a recessive manner. A recessive trait is one that is........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 12/3/2007 10:18:04 PM)

Heavy drinking and high-risk sexual behavior

Heavy drinking and high-risk sexual behavior
Psychiatry scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have observed that a clinical diagnosis of alcohol dependence in young adults is linked to having a high number of sex partners. "Some participants in the study reported 50 or 100 partners, and research shows - and common sense tells you - that the more sex partners you have, the more likely you'll encounter someone with an STD," says first author Patricia........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 12/3/2007 10:13:45 PM)

Short, long sleep duration and increased mortality

Short, long sleep duration and increased mortality
A study reported in the December 1 issue of the journal SLEEP is the first to show that both a decrease and an increase in sleep duration are linked to an elevated risk of mortality by cardiovascular and non-cardiovascular means, respectively. The study, authored by Jane E. Ferrie, PhD, of the University College London Medical School in London, U.K., focused on 10,308 participants between 35 and 55 years of age. Baseline screening (Phase........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 12/2/2007 8:56:38 PM)

Broccoli against devastating genetic skin disorder

Broccoli against devastating genetic skin disorder
The compound sulforaphane whose natural precursors are found at high levels in broccoli and other cruciferous vegetables has been hailed for its chemopreventive powers against cancer. Now sulforaphane has demonstrated new skills in treating a genetic skin blistering disorder called epidermolysis bullosa simplex (EBS), Pierre Coulombe and his colleagues at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore report at the American........Go to the Skin news blog (Added on 12/2/2007 8:47:41 PM)

Mental illness and drug addiction may co-occur

Mental illness and drug addiction may co-occur
Why do mental illness and drug addiction so often go together" New research reveals that this type of dual diagnosis may stem from a common cause: developmental changes in the amygdala, a walnut-shaped part of the brain associated with fear, anxiety and other emotions. A full report on why these comorbid disorders may develop appears in the December Behavioral Neuroscience, published by the American Psychological Association (APA). Dual........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 12/2/2007 8:46:16 PM)

Exercise gene could help with depression

Exercise gene could help with depression
Boosting an exercise-related gene in the brain works as a powerful anti-depressant in micea finding that could lead to a new anti-depressant drug target, as per a Yale School of Medicine report in Nature Medicine. The VGF exercise-related gene and target for drug development could be even better than chemical antidepressants because it is already present in the brain, said Ronald Duman, professor of psychiatry and senior author of the........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 12/2/2007 8:21:56 PM)

Cancer cells 'feel' much softer than normal cells

Cancer cells 'feel' much softer than normal cells
A multidisciplinary team of UCLA researchers were able to differentiate metastatic cancer cells from normal cells in patient samples using leading-edge nanotechnology that measures the softness of the cells. The study, published Dec. 2, 2007 in the advance online edition of the journal Nature Nanotechnology, represents one of the first times scientists have been able to take living cells from cancer patients and apply nanotechnology to........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 12/2/2007 8:20:00 PM)

Sleep-disorder obesity and African-Americans

Sleep-disorder obesity and African-Americans
As the obesity epidemic grows in the U.S., doctors are discovering more and more far reaching health concerns for overweight children. Sleep-disordered breathing (SDB), which can include various sleep behaviors ranging in severity from snoring to obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), disproportionately affects children who are overweight and African- American, as per a new study reported in the December 2007 edition of Otolaryngology Head and Neck........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 12/1/2007 6:35:48 PM)

 

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