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Powerful biomarker panel for the early detection of breast cancer

Powerful biomarker panel for the early detection of breast cancer
In the war on cancer, perhaps there is nothing more powerful in a physician's arsenal than early detection. Despite recent advances in early detection and therapy, breast cancer remains a common and significant health problem in the United States and worldwide. Approximately one in ten women will get breast cancer in their lifetime and more than half of women with late stage cancer (II and III) have no cure or effective therapeutic available. ........Go to the Breast-cancer-blog (Added on 1/11/2011 6:49:48 AM)


Does it hurt?

Does it hurt?
It is well known that pain is a highly subjective experience. We each have a pain threshold, but this can vary depending on distractions and mood. A paper in the International Journal of Behavioural and Healthcare Research offers a cautionary note on measuring perceived pain in research. There are a number of chronic illnesses and injuries that have no well-defined symptoms other than pain, but because of the subjectivity in a patient's........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 1/11/2011 6:24:06 AM)


Nuclear receptors against cancer, obesity

Nuclear receptors against cancer, obesity
Research with significant implications in the therapy and intervention of cancer and obesity has been published recently in two prestigious journals by University of Houston (UH) biochemist Dr. Jan-�ke Gustafsson. In an invited review in the Journal of Biological Chemistry, the most-cited biomedical research journal in the world, Gustafsson and his team summarize the most recent results pertaining to the function of a nuclear receptor........Go to the Research news blog (Added on 1/10/2011 10:17:43 PM)


Many survivors of the WTC attacks experience PTSD

Many survivors of the WTC attacks experience PTSD
Nearly 10 years after the greatest human-made disaster in U.S. history-- the destruction of the World Trade Center (WTC) towers -- there has been little research documenting the attacks' consequences among those most directly affected -- the survivors who escaped the World Trade Center towers. In a study just released by Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health, in conjunction with the New York City Department of Health and Mental........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 1/10/2011 6:52:54 AM)


Colorectal cancer screening disparities

Colorectal cancer screening disparities
Individuals from certain areas of the United States are more likely to get screened for colorectal cancer than those from other areas, especially when comparing non-whites living in different parts of the country. That is the conclusion of a newly released study published early online in Cancer, a peer-evaluated journal of the American Cancer Society. Additional research is needed to better understand how colorectal cancer screening disparities........Go to the Colon-cancer-blog (Added on 1/10/2011 6:17:56 AM)


Promise for New Drug to Treat Fragile X

Promise for New Drug to Treat Fragile X
The first drug to treat the underlying disorder instead of the symptoms of Fragile X, the most common cause of inherited intellectual disability, shows some promise as per a newly released study reported in the recent issue of Science Translational Medicine. Scientists from Rush University Medical Center helped design the study and are now participating in the larger follow-up clinical trial. The data from the early trial of 30 Fragile X........Go to the Research news blog (Added on 1/8/2011 11:27:51 PM)


Widespread use of costly antipsychotic drugs

Widespread use of costly antipsychotic drugs
A number of prescriptions for the top-selling class of drugs, known as atypical antipsychotic medications, lack good evidence that the drugs will actually help, a study by scientists at the Stanford University School of Medicine and University of Chicago has found. Yet, drugs in this class may cause such serious effects as weight gain, diabetes and heart disease, and cost Americans billions of dollars. "Because these drugs have safety........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 1/7/2011 6:58:22 AM)


A new drug target in atherosclerosis

A new drug target in atherosclerosis
For decades, doctors have looked at fitness levels, weight, and overall health risk factors for heart disease and stroke. Now, they may soon add a new risk factor to the list: activation of the complement system. The complement system is commonly implicated in immune responses, but now there's a role for it in cardiovascular disease. In a new research report appearing in the January 2011 print issue of the FASEB Journal (http://www.fasebj.org),........Go to the Research news blog (Added on 1/5/2011 7:01:43 AM)


Double doses of chicken pox vaccine most effective

Double doses of chicken pox vaccine most effective
When vaccinating children against varicella (chicken pox), scientists at Yale School of Medicine have found, two doses are better than one. In fact, the odds of developing chicken pox were 95 percent lower in children who had received two doses of the vaccine compared with those who had received only one dose. Reported in the February 1 issue of Journal of Infectious Diseases, the study was led by Eugene D. Shapiro, M.D., professor in the........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 1/5/2011 6:38:28 AM)


Fertility preservation for oncology patients

Fertility preservation for oncology patients
A number of young people who've just learned that they have cancer also are told that the therapies that may save their lives could rob them of their ability ever to have children. Infertility caused by chemotherapy and radiation affects a sizable population: Of the 1.5 million people diagnosed with cancer in 2009, nearly 10 percent were still in their reproductive years. The good news, as per an article in the recent issue of Mayo Clinic........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 1/4/2011 6:59:08 AM)


Vitamin D deficiencies and autoimmune lung disease

Vitamin D deficiencies and autoimmune lung disease
A newly released study shows that vitamin D deficiency could be associated with the development and severity of certain autoimmune lung diseases. These findings are being published in the Jan. 4 edition of the journal Chest Brent Kinder, MD, UC Health pulmonologist, director of the Interstitial Lung Disease Center at the University of Cincinnati and lead investigator on the study, says vitamin D deficiencies have been found to affect the........Go to the Lung news blog (Added on 1/4/2011 6:24:43 AM)


Alcoholism and risk for obesity

Alcoholism and risk for obesity
Addiction scientists at Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis have observed that a risk for alcoholism also may put individuals at risk for obesity. The scientists noted that the association between a family history of alcoholism and obesity risk has become more pronounced in recent years. Both men and women with such a family history were more likely to be obese in 2002 than members of that same high-risk group had been in........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 1/3/2011 6:48:56 AM)


CPAP therapy reduces fatigue

 CPAP therapy reduces fatigue
Patients with obstructive sleep apnea often report that they feel like "a new person" after beginning therapy with continuous positive airway pressure treatment. A newly released study in the Jan. 1 issue of the journal SLEEP provides objective evidence to support these anecdotal reports, showing that three weeks of CPAP treatment significantly reduced fatigue and increased energy in patients with OSA. Results of the randomized controlled........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 1/3/2011 6:39:21 AM)


Tonsillectomy in children

Tonsillectomy in children
A multidisciplinary clinical practice guideline, "Tonsillectomy in Children" would be reported in the recent issue of Otolaryngology�Head and Neck Surgery (watch for a new cover and publisher in that issue of the journal). The new guideline provides evidence-based recommendations on the pre-, intra-, and postoperative care and management of children aged 1 to 18 years under consideration for tonsillectomy. Additionally, this guideline is........Go to the Pediatric news blog (Added on 1/3/2011 6:20:28 AM)


Protein involved in cystic fibrosis

Protein involved in cystic fibrosis
A team of Johns Hopkins Children's Center scientists has discovered that a protein involved in cystic fibrosis (CF) also regulates inflammation and cell death in emphysema and appears to be responsible for other chronic lung diseases. The findings, published online in the recent issue of The Journal of Immunology, pave the way toward new therapys to prevent lung damage caused by infections or cigarette smoke in emphysema. The protein,........Go to the Research news blog (Added on 12/30/2010 6:33:24 AM)


Breathalyzers for medical diagnostics

Breathalyzers for medical diagnostics
Scientists have overcome a fundamental obstacle in developing breath-analysis technology to rapidly diagnose patients by detecting chemical compounds called "biomarkers" in a person's respiration in real time. The scientists demonstrated their approach is capable of rapidly detecting biomarkers in the parts per billion to parts per million range, at least 100 times better than prior breath-analysis technologies, said Carlos Martinez, an........Go to the Research news blog (Added on 12/29/2010 6:34:10 AM)


Electronic medical records not always linked to better care

Electronic medical records not always linked to better care
Use of electronic health records by hospitals across the United States has had only a limited effect on improving the quality of medical care, as per a new RAND Corporation study. Studying a wide mix of hospitals nationally, scientists observed that hospitals with basic electronic health records demonstrated a significantly higher increase in quality of care for patients being treated for heart failure. However, similar gains were not........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 12/25/2010 10:44:31 AM)


Eat your veggies, reward your kidneys

Eat your veggies, reward your kidneys
Phosphorous levels plummet in kidney disease patients who stick to a vegetarian diet, as per a research studyappearing in an upcoming issue of the Clinical Journal of the American Society Nephrology (CJASN). The results suggest that eating vegetables rather than meat can help kidney disease patients avoid accumulating toxic levels of this mineral in their bodies. Individuals with kidney disease cannot adequately rid the body of phosphorus,........Go to the Kidney watch blog (Added on 12/25/2010 10:32:52 AM)


Robotic surgery for head and neck cancer

Robotic surgery for head and neck cancer
Less-invasive robotic surgery for upper airway and digestive track cancerous tumors is as effective as other minimally invasive surgical techniques based on patient function and survival, as per University of Alabama at Birmingham researchers. Head and neck squamous cell carcinomas account for about 4 percent of cancerous tumors diagnosed in the United States each year. Currently the standard minimally invasive surgery for these tumors is........Go to the ENT news blog (Added on 12/21/2010 6:38:40 AM)


Chemotherapy boost survival of older teenage leukemia patients

Chemotherapy  boost survival of older teenage leukemia patients
More effective risk-adjusted chemotherapy and sophisticated patient monitoring helped push cure rates to nearly 88 percent for older adolescents enrolled in a St. Jude Children's Research Hospital acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) therapy protocol and closed the survival gap between older and younger patients battling the most common childhood cancer. A report online in the December 20 edition of the Journal of Clinical Oncology noted that........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 12/21/2010 6:21:56 AM)


 

Robotic surgery of 'tremendous benefit' to patients

Robotic surgery of 'tremendous benefit'  to patients
Robot-assisted surgery dramatically improves outcomes in patients with uterine, endometrial, and cervical cancer, said scientists at the Jewish General Hospital's Lady Davis Institute for Medical Research in Montreal. Moreover, because of fewer post-operative complications and shorter hospital stays, robotic procedures also cost less. These results were published in late 2010 in a series of studies in The Journal of Robotic Surgery and The........Go to the Research news blog (Added on 1/12/2011 6:41:14 PM)


Identifying depressed students

Identifying depressed students
One out of every four or five students who visits a university health center for a routine cold or sore throat turns out to be depressed, but most centers miss the opportunity to identify these students because they don't screen for depression, as per new Northwestern Medicine research. About 2 to 3 percent of these depressed students have had suicidal thoughts or are considering suicide, the study found. "Depression screening is easy to........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 1/11/2011 6:17:34 AM)


Abstinence, heavy drinking, binge drinking

Abstinence, heavy drinking, binge drinking
Prior research regarding the association between alcohol consumption and dementia or cognitive impairment in later life suggests that mild to moderate alcohol consumption might be protective of dementia. However, most of the research has been conducted on subjects already rather elderly at the start of the follow-up. A newly released study reported in the recent issue of the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease addresses this problem with a........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 1/10/2011 10:19:13 PM)


Grape ingredient resveratrol

Grape ingredient resveratrol
Resveratrol, a compound in grapes, displays antioxidant and other positive properties. As per a research findings published this week, scientists at the UT Health Science Center San Antonio describe a novel way in which resveratrol exerts these beneficial health effects. Resveratrol stimulates the expression of adiponectin, a hormone derived from cells that manufacture and store fat, the team found. Adiponectin has a wide range of beneficial........Go to the Research news blog (Added on 1/10/2011 6:49:40 AM)


Fear of the dentist's drill

Fear of the dentist's drill
An innovative device which cancels out the noise of the dental drill could spell the end of people's anxiety about trips to the dentist, as per experts at King's College London, Brunel University and London South Bank University, who pioneered the invention. It is widely known that the sound of the dental drill is the prime cause of anxiety about dental therapy, and some patients avoid trips to the dentist because of it. This new device........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 1/10/2011 6:25:46 AM)


What causes brain cell death in Parkinson's patients

What causes brain cell death in Parkinson's patients
Just 5 percent of Parkinson's disease cases can be explained by genetic mutation, while the rest have no known cause. But a new discovery by scientists at The University of Texas Health Science Center appears to begin to explain why the vast majority of Parkinson's patients develop the progressive neurodegenerative disease. This week in The Journal of Neuroscience, the scientists demystified a process that leads to the death of brain cells -........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 1/8/2011 11:37:03 PM)


How do data exclusivity periods affect

How do data exclusivity periods affect
Pharmaceutical companies and generic drug manufacturers have long been at odds over regulations about "data exclusivity," the period of time before generic manufacturers can make use of valuable clinical trial data. A newly released study in the January 2011 issue of Health Affairs is the first to calculate the financial and social costs of limiting access to trial data and finds that extending the term of exclusive access will lead to........Go to the Research news blog (Added on 1/6/2011 6:19:03 PM)


Metabolic cost of human sleep deprivation

Metabolic cost of human sleep deprivation
In the first-ever quantification of energy expended by humans during sleep, a University of Colorado team has observed that the metabolic cost of an adult missing one night of sleep is the equivalent of walking slightly less than two miles. The new findings will help scientists further understand one of the important functions of sleep in humans, said CU-Boulder Associate Professor Kenneth Wright. Wright, who led the study, said the goal was........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 1/5/2011 6:46:39 AM)


Peptide against Breast cancer

Peptide against Breast cancer
Scientists at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center (WFUBMC) have discovered what appears to become a new weapon in the fight against breast cancer. For the first time, a peptide found in blood and tissue has been shown to inhibit the growth of human breast tumors in mice, as per a research studyrecently reported in the journal Cancer Research. Patricia E. Gallagher, Ph.D., and E. Ann Tallant, Ph.D., researchers in the High blood........Go to the Breast-cancer-blog (Added on 1/4/2011 7:02:39 AM)


Mothers Key To College-age Women Receiving HPV Vaccine

Mothers Key To College-age Women Receiving HPV Vaccine
Even after young women reach adulthood, their mothers can play a key role in convincing them to receive the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, new research suggests. A study observed that college-aged women were more likely to say they had received the HPV vaccine if they had talked to their mother about it. "Mothers talking to their daughters were an important factor in whether young women were vaccinated," said Janice Krieger, main........Go to the OBGYN news blog (Added on 1/4/2011 6:44:20 AM)


Kids frequently exposed to imaging procedures

Kids frequently exposed to imaging procedures
The rapid growth in use of medical diagnostic imaging, such as Computerized axial tomography scans, has led to widespread concern about radiation exposure in adults and the potential for future cancer risk in patients undergoing these tests. A newly released study led by University of Michigan scientists now shows that kids also frequently receive these types of imaging procedures during their routine clinical care, and highlights the........Go to the Pediatric news blog (Added on 1/4/2011 6:36:38 AM)


Estrogen may help precancerous cells spread

Estrogen may help precancerous cells spread
head and neck cancer is the sixth most common type of cancer and is on the rise in some demographic groups, including young women without any known risk factors. Now, scientists at Fox Chase Cancer Center report that estrogen may increase the movement of premalignant cells in the mouth and thus promote the spread of the disease within the oral cavity. The new results, reported in the recent issue of Cancer Prevention Research, a journal of........Go to the ENT news blog (Added on 1/4/2011 6:21:05 AM)


Angry at God? If so, you're not alone

Angry at God? If so, you're not alone
The notion of being angry with God goes back to ancient days. Such personal struggles are not new, but Case Western Reserve University psychology expert Julie Exline began looking at "anger at God" in a new way. "A number of people experience anger toward God," Exline explains. "Even people who deeply love and respect God can become angry. Just as people become upset or angry with others, including loved ones, they can also become angry........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 1/3/2011 6:41:00 AM)


New answers for health care design?

New answers for health care design?
Could a plant "intervention" improve the well-being of patients in a difficult rehab process? Researchers from the Norwegian University of Life Sciences and Sweden's Uppsala University investigated this question in a recent study of 436 coronary and pulmonary patients at a Norwegian rehabilitation center. The results were published in HortScience Ruth Kj�rsti Raanaas, Grete Grindal Patil, and Terry Hartig studied the effects of an indoor plant........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 12/30/2010 6:39:49 AM)


Coma and general anesthesia

Coma and general anesthesia
The brain under general anesthesia isn't "asleep" as surgery patients are often told -- it is placed into a state that is a reversible coma, as per three neuroresearchers who have published an extensive review of general anesthesia, sleep and coma, in the Dec. 30 issue of the New England Journal (NEJM) This insight and others published in their review article could eventually lead to new approaches to general anesthesia and improved diagnosis........Go to the Research news blog (Added on 12/30/2010 6:31:21 AM)


Key interaction in hepatitis C virus

Key interaction in hepatitis C virus
Researchers from the Florida campus of The Scripps Research Institute have identified a molecular interaction between a structural hepatitis C virus protein (HCV) and a protein critical to viral replication. This new finding strongly suggests a novel method of inhibiting the production of the virus and a potential new therapeutic target for hepatitis C drug development. The study was reported in the January 2010 issue (Volume 92, Part 1) of........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 12/29/2010 6:24:45 AM)


Poor response to anti-anemia drug predicts higher risk

Poor response to anti-anemia drug predicts higher risk
Patients with diabetes, kidney disease and anemia who don't respond to therapy with an anti-anemia drug have a higher risk of cardiovascular disease or death, scientists at UT Southwestern Medical Center have found. The results suggest that testing such patients' responsiveness to the drug and keeping blood iron levels a little low might reduce their risk, said Dr. Robert Toto, professor of internal medicine and clinical sciences and a........Go to the Heart-watch-blog (Added on 12/29/2010 6:06:02 AM)


You are what your father ate

You are what your father ate
Researchers at the University of Massachusetts Medical School and the University of Texas at Austin have uncovered evidence that environmental influences experienced by a father can be passed down to the next generation, "reprogramming" how genes function in offspring. A newly released study published this week in Cell shows that environmental cues�in this case, diet�influence genes in mammals from one generation to the next, evidence that........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 12/24/2010 1:38:04 PM)


Fat cells become useful stem cells

Fat cells become useful stem cells
Two studies appearing in the current issue. of Cell Transplantation 19(10) discuss stem cells derived from adipose (fat) cells and their potential use in plastic surgery and tissue reconstruction. The studies are now freely available on-line at http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/cog/ct/. Adipose-derived stem cells maintain their "stemness" and could be useful for cell-based therapies. A team of scientists from several institutions........Go to the Research news blog (Added on 12/24/2010 1:29:18 PM)


Malaria-infected cells stiffen, block blood flow

Malaria-infected cells stiffen, block blood flow
Eventhough the occurence rate of malaria has declined in all but a few countries worldwide, as per a World Health Organization report earlier this month, malaria remains a global threat. Nearly 800,000 people succumbed to the mosquito-borne disease in 2009, nearly all of them in the developing world. Physicians do not have reliable therapy for the virus at various stages, largely because no one has been able to document the malaria........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 12/21/2010 6:23:56 AM)


 

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Cancer terms:
Oncologist: Physician or surgeon who had specialized in the treatment of cancer. Medical oncologists usually treat patients with chemotherapy, hormonal therapy and biological therapy, radiation oncologists treat cancer with radiation therapy and surgical oncologists treat patients with surgery. See cancer terms for more cancer related terms.

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