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Nano Cocktail to Target Tumors

Nano Cocktail to Target Tumors
A team of scientists in California and Massachusetts has developed a "cocktail" of different nanometer-sized particles that work in concert within the bloodstream to locate, adhere to and kill malignant tumors. "This study represents the first example of the benefits of employing a cooperative nanosystem to fight cancer," said Michael Sailor, a professor of chemistry and biochemistry at the University of California, San Diego and the primary........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 1/5/2010 9:04:54 AM)


Ffat mass helps build bone mass in girls

Ffat mass helps build bone mass in girls
As per a newly released study accepted for publication in The Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism (JCEM), fat mass is important in increasing bone size and thickness, but this effect may be stronger in girls than boys. Lean mass is one of the strongest determinants of bone mass throughout life. Until now, it has been unclear whether fat mass and lean mass differ in how they influence bone development in boys........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 1/5/2010 8:41:30 AM)


HIV-infected postmenopausal women

HIV-infected postmenopausal women
As per a newly released study accepted for publication in The Endocrine Society's Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism (JCEM), postmenopausal HIV-infected women have a high prevalence of low bone mineral density and high bone turnover placing them at high risk for future bone fractures. "As HIV-infected individuals live longer with potent antiretroviral treatment (ART), metabolic complications such as low bone density and........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 1/5/2010 8:40:29 AM)


Experimental drug shows promise against cancers

Experimental drug shows promise against cancers
An experimental drug currently being tested against breast and lung cancer shows promise in fighting the brain cancer glioblastoma and prostate cancer, scientists at UT Southwestern Medical Center have found in two preclinical studies. The drug's actions, observed in isolated human cells in one trial and in rodents in the other, are particularly encouraging because they attacked not only the bulk of the tumor cells but also the rare cancer........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 1/4/2010 8:04:14 AM)


Promise for high-speed genetic sequencing

Promise for high-speed genetic sequencing
Faster sequencing of DNA holds enormous potential for biology and medicine, especially for personalized diagnosis and customized therapy based on each individual's genomic makeup. At present however, sequencing technology remains cumbersome and cost prohibitive for most clinical applications, though this appears to be changing, thanks to a range of innovative new techniques. In the current issue of Science, Stuart Lindsay, director of........Go to the Research news blog (Added on 1/3/2010 10:51:48 AM)


Tell them to go to bed early

Tell them to go to bed early
A study in the Jan. 1 issue of the journal Sleep observed that adolescents with bedtimes that were set earlier by parents were significantly less likely to suffer from depression and to think about committing suicide, suggesting that earlier bedtimes could have a protective effect by lengthening sleep duration and increasing the likelihood of getting enough sleep. Results show that adolescents with parental set bedtimes of midnight or later........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 1/3/2010 10:47:21 AM)


Acupuncture reduces hot flashes

Acupuncture reduces hot flashes
Not only is acupuncture as effective as drug treatment at reducing hot flashes in patients with breast cancer, it has the added benefit of potentially increasing a woman's sex drive and improving her sense of well-being, as per a Henry Ford Hospital study. Study results show that acupuncture, when in comparison to drug treatment, has a longer-lasting effect on the reduction of hot flashes and night sweats for women receiving hormone........Go to the Breast-cancer-blog (Added on 12/30/2009 8:16:00 AM)


Why some continue to eat when full

Why some continue to eat when full
The premise that hunger makes food look more appealing is a widely held belief just ask those who cruise grocery store aisles on an empty stomach, only to go home with a full basket and an empty wallet. Previous research studies have suggested that the so-called hunger hormone ghrelin, which the body produces when it's hungry, might act on the brain to trigger this behavior. New research in mice by UT Southwestern Medical Center researchers........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 12/29/2009 8:52:14 AM)


Exposure to tobacco in childhood

Exposure to tobacco in childhood
Children regularly exposed to tobacco smoke at home were more likely to develop early emphysema in adulthood. This finding by scientists at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health suggests that the lungs may not recover completely from the effects of early-life exposures to tobacco smoke (ETS). The study is reported in the December 2009 American Journal of Epidemiology This population-based research is the first to examine the........Go to the Lung news blog (Added on 12/29/2009 8:47:57 AM)


A controller of brain circuitry

A controller of brain circuitry
By combining a research technique that dates back 136 years with modern molecular genetics, a Johns Hopkins neuroscientist has been able to see how a mammal's brain shrewdly revisits and reuses the same molecular cues to control the complex design of its circuits. Details of the observation in lab mice, published Dec. 24 in Nature, reveal that semaphorin, a protein found in the developing nervous system that guides filament-like processes,........Go to the Neurology news blog (Added on 12/29/2009 8:08:50 AM)


Self-seeding of cancer cells

Self-seeding of cancer cells
Cancer progression is usually thought of as a process involving the growth of a primary tumor followed by metastasis, in which cancer cells leave the primary tumor and spread to distant organs. A newly released study by scientists at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center shows that circulating tumor cells cancer cells that break away from a primary tumor and disseminate to other areas of the body can also return to and grow in their tumor of........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 12/24/2009 10:10:39 PM)


Future-minded people make better decisions

Future-minded people make better decisions
When New Year's Eve rolls around and you're deciding whether to have another glass of champagne, your decision appears to be predicted by your perspective of the future. A pair of Kansas State University scientists observed that people who tend to think in the long term are more likely to make positive decisions about their health, whether it's how much they drink, what they eat, or their decision to wear sunscreen. "If you are more........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 12/24/2009 7:09:27 AM)


Improving mammogram accuracy

Improving mammogram accuracy
Members of a Syracuse University research team have shown that an obscure phenomenon called stochastic resonance (SR) can improve the clarity of signals in systems such as radar, sonar and even radiography, used in medical clinics to detect signs of breast cancer. It does this by adding carefully selected noise to the system. The result has been a distinct improvement in the system's ability to correctly identify premalignant lesions, plus a........Go to the Breast-cancer-blog (Added on 12/23/2009 8:05:17 AM)


New, virulent strain of MRSA

New, virulent strain of MRSA
The often feared and sometimes deadly infections caused by MRSA - methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus - are now moving out of hospitals and emerging as an even more virulent strain in community settings and on athletic teams, and raising new concerns about antibiotic resistance. Right now, the new community-associated strain of MRSA is responsive to more, but sometimes different antibiotics than its hospital relative, experts say.........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 12/23/2009 8:04:04 AM)


Nanotechnology Heals Abscesses

Nanotechnology Heals Abscesses
Scientists at Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University have developed a new approach for treating and healing skin abscesses caused by bacteria resistant to most antibiotics. The study appears in the journal PLoS One. Abscesses are deep skin infections that often resist antibiotics and may require surgical drainage. For their new therapy strategy, the Einstein researchers developed tiny nanoparticles - smaller than a grain........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 12/23/2009 7:57:27 AM)


Switching off hunger hormone

Switching off hunger hormone
A Faculty of 1000 assessment examines how a stomach-produced hormone that influences the desire to eat and consume alcohol could be switched off to control drinking problems. The study, carried out by Jerlhag et al. at the University of Gothenburg in Sweden, showed that the hormone ghrelin, typically released by the stomach and known to promote appetite and therefore the intake of food, also influences the consumption of alcohol. The........Go to the Research news blog (Added on 12/23/2009 7:50:23 AM)


The use and misuse of alcohol and marijuana

The use and misuse of alcohol and marijuana
Marijuana is the most usually used illicit drug in the United States. Roughly eight to 12 percent of marijuana users are considered "dependent" and, just like alcohol, the severity of symptoms increases with heavier use. A newly released study has observed that use and misuse of alcohol and marijuana are influenced by a common set of genes. Results would be reported in the March 2010 issue of Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 12/18/2009 7:09:45 PM)


Bourbon hurts more the next day

Bourbon hurts more the next day
A number of alcoholic beverages contain byproducts of the materials used in the fermenting process. These byproducts are called "congeners," complex organic molecules with toxic effects including acetone, acetaldehyde, fusel oil, tannins, and furfural. Bourbon has 37 times the amount of congeners that vodka has. A newly released study has observed that while drinking a lot of bourbon can cause a worse hangover than drinking a lot of vodka,........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 12/18/2009 8:23:33 AM)


Protein that causes cystic fibrosis

Protein that causes cystic fibrosis
A team of scientists studying the protein that, when defective or absent, causes cystic fibrosis (CF) has made an important discovery about how that protein is normally controlled and under what circumstances it might go awry. "Understanding the regulation of salt transport in normal cells is critical for the development of new therapies for diseases, like CF, that disrupt salt movements across cell borders," said Jeng-Haur Chen, a........Go to the Lung news blog (Added on 12/18/2009 8:22:14 AM)


Terminal cancer patients' spiritual needs

Terminal cancer patients' spiritual needs
In a newly released study of terminally ill cancer patients, scientists at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute found support of patients' spiritual needs by the medical team is linked to greater use of hospice, less aggressive care, and greater quality of life near death. The study is published by the Journal of Clinical Oncology on its web site and later will be published in a print edition. "Recent research has shown that religion and........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 12/15/2009 11:37:51 PM)


 

Pomegranate to prevent breast cancer?

Pomegranate to prevent breast cancer?
Eating fruit, such as pomegranates, that contain anti-aromatase phytochemicals reduces the occurence rate of hormone-dependent breast cancer, as per results of a study reported in the recent issue of Cancer Prevention Research, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research. Pomegranate is enriched in a series of compounds known as ellagitannins that, as shown in this study, appear to be responsible for the anti-proliferative........Go to the Breast-cancer-blog (Added on 1/5/2010 8:51:55 AM)


Obesity now equals smoking in posing threat to quality of life

Obesity now equals smoking in posing threat to quality of life
As the US population becomes increasingly obese while smoking rates continue to decline, obesity has become an equal, if not greater, contributor to the burden of disease and shortening of healthy life compared to smoking. In an article reported in the February 2010 issue of the American Journal of Preventive Medicine, scientists from Columbia University and The City College of New York calculate that the Quality-Adjusted Life Years (QALYs)........Go to the Weight watcher's blog (Added on 1/5/2010 8:50:10 AM)


Celebrex may prevent skin cancers

Celebrex may prevent skin cancers
A widely-available anti-inflammatory prescription drug can reduce the risk of a common skin cancer in humans, as per a researcher at Stanford's School of Medicine. Eventhough oral administration of the drug, celecoxib, is linked to an increased risk of heart attack and stroke in some people, it's possible that topical application could have a safer, protective effect for people prone to developing the cancers, called basal cell carcinomas, the........Go to the Skin news blog (Added on 1/5/2010 8:39:25 AM)


Addictive Effects of Caffeine on Kids

Addictive Effects of Caffeine on Kids
Caffeine is a stimulant drug, eventhough legal, and adults use it widely to perk themselves up: Being "addicted" to caffeine is considered perfectly normal. But how strong is caffeine's appeal in young people who consume an abundance of soft drinks? What impact does acute and chronic caffeine consumption have on their blood pressure, heart rate and hand tremor? Furthermore, does consuming caffeinated drinks during adolescence contribute........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 1/4/2010 8:14:50 AM)


It's never too late to quit smoking

It's never too late to quit smoking
Need a little extra incentive to kick the habit? Just in time for New Year's resolutions, a UCLA study finds that even after age 80, smoking continues to increase one's risk for age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the leading cause of blindness in Americans over 65. The American Journal of Ophthalmology publishes the findings in its January edition. "The take-home message is that it's never too late to quit smoking," said main........Go to the Ophthalmology news blog (Added on 1/3/2010 10:49:06 AM)


Ginkgo biloba may not work

Ginkgo biloba may not work
Elderly adults who used the herbal supplement Ginkgo biloba for several years did not have a slower rate of cognitive decline in comparison to adults who received placebo, as per a research studyin the December 23/30 issue of JAMA "Ginkgo biloba is marketed widely and used with the hope of improving, preventing, or delaying cognitive impairment linked to aging and neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer disease," the authors write.........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 12/30/2009 8:19:08 AM)


Genetic Causes in Lipid Metabolism troubles

Genetic Causes in Lipid Metabolism troubles
Researchers of Helmholtz Zentrum M√ľnchen led by Professor Karsten Suhre have identified new gene variants linked to disturbances in the lipid metabolism. Some of these common human gene variants are already known to be risk factors for diabetes mellitus. The pathomechanisms of diabetes have intrigued physicians and been the subject of much debate for a number of decades. These new research results may contribute to a better understanding of the........Go to the Research news blog (Added on 12/29/2009 8:56:28 AM)


Couples better able to cope with health shocks

Couples better able to cope with health shocks
Marital status plays a significant role in how individuals cope economically with disability and health shocks, as per a working paper by University of British Columbia economists Giovanni Gallipoli and Laura Turner. In their study, titled Household Responses to Individual Shocks: Disability and Labour Supply, the scientists examined data from the Canadian Survey of Labour and Income Dynamics (SLID) and observed that in marriages,........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 12/29/2009 8:50:09 AM)


Schizophrenia mouse model

Schizophrenia mouse model
Researchers have created what may be a schizophrenic mouse by reducing the inhibition of brain cells involved in complex reasoning and decisions about appropriate social behavior. Findings by Medical College of Georgia scientists, published Dec. 28 in PNAS, elucidate the critical balance between excitation and inhibition of these cells that appears to go awry in schizophrenia. They also provide the first animal model for studying the........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 12/29/2009 8:11:18 AM)


Vitamin C boosts the reprogramming of adult cells into stem cells

Vitamin C boosts the reprogramming of adult cells into stem cells
Famous for its antioxidant properties and role in tissue repair, vitamin C is touted as beneficial for illnesses ranging from the common cold to cancer and perhaps even for slowing the aging process. Now, a study published online on December 24th by Cell Press in the journal Cell Stem Cell uncovers an unexpected new role for this natural compound: facilitating the generation of embryonic-like stem cells from adult cells. Over the past few........Go to the Research news blog (Added on 12/24/2009 10:14:49 PM)


New tool in the fight against mosquito-borne disease

New tool in the fight against mosquito-borne disease
Earlier this year, scientists showed that they could cut the lives of disease-carrying mosquitoes in half by infecting them with a bacterium they took from fruit flies. Now, a new report in the December 24th issue of Cell, a Cell Press publication, suggests that their strategy might do one better: The Wolbachia bacteria also makes the mosquitoes more resistant to infection by viruses that are a growing threat to humans, including those........Go to the Infectious disease blog (Added on 12/24/2009 10:13:21 PM)


Sleeping Off Childhood?

Sleeping Off Childhood?
Are your 11- and 12-year-olds staying up later, then dozing off at school the next day? Parents and educators who notice poor sleeping patterns in their children should take note of new research from Tel Aviv University ? and prepare themselves for bigger changes to come. Prof. Avi Sadeh of TAU's Department of Psychology suggests that changes in children's sleep patterns are evident just before the onset of physical changes linked to........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 12/23/2009 11:03:54 PM)


Anti-inflammatory drugs interfere with aspirin

Anti-inflammatory drugs interfere with aspirin
A newly released study conducted at Ben-Gurion University of the Negev (BGU) reveals that Celebrex and other anti-inflammatory coxib medications may counter the positive effects of aspirin in preventing blood clots. The research, reported in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), indicates that people who are taking aspirin and coxibs together are in fact inhibiting the aspirin's effectiveness in preventing heart attacks........Go to the Heart-watch-blog (Added on 12/23/2009 11:01:02 PM)


Tylenol against psychological pain?

Tylenol against psychological pain?
Headaches and heartaches. Broken bones and broken spirits. Hurting bodies and hurt feelings. We often use the same words to describe physical and mental pain. Over-the-counter pain relieving drugs have long been used to alleviate physical pain, while a host of other medications have been employed in the therapy of depression and anxiety. But is it possible that a common painkiller could serve double duty, easing not just the physical pains of........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 12/23/2009 7:59:53 AM)


Success with new anti-cancer drug

Success with new anti-cancer drug
A study conducted at Scott & White Healthcare in Temple, Texas, observed that a new drug stopped the growth of breast tumors in mice. This drug is unique in that it works both by stopping the cancer cells from growing and metastasizing to other organs, and by stimulating the immune system to destroy breast cancer cells and keeps them from coming back. This is the only drug that's able to work in both ways, while all other therapys work in one........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 12/23/2009 7:58:29 AM)


Pollution can increase the risk of penumonia

Pollution can increase the risk of penumonia
Elderly adults with long-term exposure to higher levels of pollution are at higher risk for hospitalization for pneumonia, as per scientists in Canada. "Our study observed that among older individuals, long-term exposure to traffic pollution independently increased their risk of hospitalization for pneumonia," said principal investigator, Mark Loeb, M.D., of McMaster University. The research would be reported in the January 1 issue of the........Go to the Lung news blog (Added on 12/23/2009 7:53:50 AM)


Metastasis formation in real time

Metastasis formation in real time
Up to 25% of cancer patients develop metastases in the brain often long after successful therapy of the primary tumor. In almost all such cases, the prognosis is poor. The mechanisms responsible for the appearance of brain metastases have long been mysterious. Now a research team led by neurologist Dr. Frank Winkler of LMU Munich has followed, in real time, the steps that lead some tumor cells to establish metastases, while others fail to form........Go to the Cancer-blog (Added on 12/21/2009 8:10:26 AM)


Postural sway among abstinent alcoholics

Postural sway among abstinent alcoholics
Excessive sway during quiet standing is a common and significant consequence of chronic alcoholism, even after prolonged sobriety, and can lead to fall-related injury and even death. A newly released study of residual postural instability in alcohol-abstinent men and women shows that alcoholics improve with prolonged sobriety, but the improvement may not fully erase the problem of instability. Results would be reported in the March 2010........Go to the Society medical news blog (Added on 12/18/2009 7:04:35 PM)


Michelangelos make smart lovers

Michelangelos make smart lovers
Is that really Bob? You've seen him hundreds of mornings for the last 10 years at local coffee shops. Since he started dating Sara, he looks you in the eye -- and smiles. Sara takes every opportunity to let coffee shop cronies know that Bob is her guy and to gush about how funny he is. And he is. Who knew? Think of Sara like Michelangelo chipping away at a block of marble to release the ideal figure slumbering within. A new international........Go to the Psychology news blog (Added on 12/17/2009 8:06:00 AM)


Chip capable of growing cardiac tissue

Chip capable of growing cardiac tissue
Johns Hopkins biomedical engineers, working with colleagues in Korea, have produced a laboratory chip with nanoscopic grooves and ridges capable of growing cardiac tissue that more closely resembles natural heart muscle. Surprisingly, heart cells cultured in this way used a "nanosense" to collect instructions for growth and function solely from the physical patterns on the nanotextured chip and did not require any special chemical cues to steer........Go to the Heart-watch-blog (Added on 12/15/2009 11:36:05 PM)


 

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Cancer terms:
Oncologist: Physician or surgeon who had specialized in the treatment of cancer. Medical oncologists usually treat patients with chemotherapy, hormonal therapy and biological therapy, radiation oncologists treat cancer with radiation therapy and surgical oncologists treat patients with surgery. See cancer terms for more cancer related terms.

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